Article on Happy People part 3

Discussion in 'Healthful Living / Natural Treatments' started by recoveringenabler, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. recoveringenabler

    recoveringenabler Well-Known Member Staff Member

    They make exercise a priority.
    A wise, albeit fictional Harvard Law School student once said, "Exercise gives you endorphins. Endorphins make you happy." Exercise has been shown to ease symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress, thanks to the the various brain chemicals that are released that amplify feelings of happiness and relaxation. Plus, working out makes us appreciate our bodies more. One study published in the Journal of Health Psychology found that exercise improved how people felt about their bodies -- even if they didn’t lose weight or achieve noticeable improvements.

    They go outside.
    Want to feel alive? Just a 20-minute dose of fresh air promotes a sense of vitality, according to several studies published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology. "Nature is fuel for the soul, " says Richard Ryan, Ph.D, the lead author of the studies. "Often when we feel depleted we reach for a cup of coffee, but research suggests a better way to get energized is to connect with nature." And while most of us like our coffee hot, we may prefer our serving of the great outdoors at a more lukewarm temperature: A study on weather and individual happiness unveiled 57 degrees to be the optimal temperature for optimal happiness.

    They spend some time on the pillow.

    Waking up on the wrong side of the bed isn't just a myth. When you're running low on zzs, you're prone to experience lack of clarity, bad moods and poor judgment. "A good night's sleep can really help a moody person decrease their anxiety," Dr. Raymonde Jean, director of sleep medicine and associate director of critical care at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center told Health.com. "You get more emotional stability with good sleep."

    They LOL.
    You've heard it before: Laughter is the best medicine. In the case of The Blues, this may hold some truth. A good, old-fashioned chuckle releases happy brain chemicalsthat, other than providing the exuberant buzz we seek, make humans better equipped to tolerate both pain and stress.

    And you might be able to get away with counting a joke-swapping session as a workout (maybe). "The body's response to repetitive laughter is similar to the effect of repetitive exercise," explained Dr. Lee Berk, the lead researcher of a 2010 study focused on laughter's effects on the body. The same study found that some of the benefits associated with working out, like a healthy immune system, controlled appetite and improved cholesterol can also be achieved through laughter.

    They walk the walk.
    Ever notice your joyful friends have a certain spring in the step? It's all about the stride, according to research conducted by Sara Snodgrass, a psychologist from Florida Atlantic University.

    In the experiment, Snodgrass asked participants to take a three-minute walk. Half of the walkers were told to take long strides while swinging their arms and holding their heads high. These walkers reported feeling happier after the stroll than the other group, who took short, shuffled steps as they watched their feet.

    Kate Bratskeir is an Associate Editor at Huffington Post where this article originally appeared. It is republished here with permission.
     
  2. Wiped Out

    Wiped Out Well-Known Member Staff Member

    RE-thanks so much for sharing this article (I actually read all 3 parts:)).
     
  3. New Leaf

    New Leaf Well-Known Member

    I just came across these articles RE, thanks for posting them, they are wonderful!
    (((Hugs)))
    leafy
     
  4. boozeoil

    boozeoil New Member

    All articles are great, thank you so much for sharing it.
     
  5. Janette Romano

    Janette Romano New Member

    These article makes sense. I have tried some of these activities and works fine with me. :)
     
Loading...