Ebook people...how do you check out books from the library?

Discussion in 'The Watercooler' started by DammitJanet, Nov 23, 2010.

  1. DammitJanet

    DammitJanet Well-Known Member Staff Member

    I know I have heard it said somewhere that you can get books from the library on your reader, how do you do that? Can someone help me?

    Please???? With a cherry on top!
     
  2. Jena

    Jena New Member

    i have no idea but i just some websites where you can order them? i have a question i just posted. what type of ebook should i get??? husband wanted one and there are alot of diff brands. it's confusing
     
  3. Mattsmom277

    Mattsmom277 Active Member

    Janet, I believe you go in to the library and select from their ebooks. They will load them to your eReader for you. They typically expire after 2 weeks, just like a due date for a normal library book.
     
  4. 1905

    1905 Well-Known Member

    This is a stupid question, how much do books cost for an eReader? Where is the best place to get them? husband and I are both avid readers and I would love to get him one. What brand would anyone suggest? or suggest not to get? Thanks.
     
  5. Mattsmom277

    Mattsmom277 Active Member

    Not a stupid question! There are tons of ways to get ebooks, various costs. There are sites like the Kindle Store, the Sony store etc. There are tons of free (legal) ebooks where copyright is no longer in effect, and plenty of authors release books for publicity for free. Google searching for free ebook sites in the US is helpful to find the places with legit legal free downloads. The kindle and sony store, etc etc have various prices. LIke regular book stores, you can get discounted books. I've seen them as low as .25 - $1.00 per book. Most new releases sell for a couple of dollars less than a regular books.
    I happen to live in a country where it is not illegal to share digital books, so for that I'm fortunate. I can read anything I like for no cost by using a newsgroup to find copies of whatever I like.
    Libraries will let you check them out and they expire all on their own (how neat is that??). A great way to continue to read free. I know that Kindle allows you to have a list of Kindle "friends" (I believe its up to 5 friends). Basically you link your accounts in the Kindle store/software. It allows all of you in your "friend web" to share your books legally. Your books also stay stored on their server so even if you delete from your reader and your computer, you can grab the file anytime you like forever as well. I think, but not sure, that some other readers allow the same type thing. If I was using the Kindle, I'd definitely be finding people for my list that are avid readers with the same taste in books as I have to maximize my library.
    There are also some neat free ebook sites that email you updates when new titles come available that are legal for free download. I get emails all of the time from various sites. Its also allowed me to find new authors I might never have known about which I find fantastic.
     
  6. HaoZi

    HaoZi Guest

    Is Kindle the only one with a text to speech feature? Looking at getting ereaders for us come tax time.
     
  7. Mattsmom277

    Mattsmom277 Active Member

    I don't know Haozi ... I know that my Sony reader has a place to plug in headphones for audio books but that's not quite the same as text to speech. Perhaps google it?
     
  8. HaoZi

    HaoZi Guest

    Found the review comparison chart ;) It's in the other thread, I'll link it here, too. http://ebook-reader-review.toptenreviews.com/
    Hibernator says she understands better when she hears it than when she reads it, so I want one that will read to her.
     
  9. Lothlorien

    Lothlorien Active Member Staff Member

    First off, most library web sites have a particular program they use, like Acrobat Reader or the like. When you add it to your cart, you should also find a button to download the software for your computer. Once you do that, download the book, hook up your reader to the usb port and you should be able to "transfer" the file from the program that your library uses. For instance, for audiobooks, from my library, they use Overlook Media. I download the file from the libary, hook up my mp3 player and then from Overlook, I transfer the file. Should work the same for your ereader.
     
  10. DammitJanet

    DammitJanet Well-Known Member Staff Member

    Would the library have a website or do you have to actually go in? Or can you "borrow" from any library anywhere in the country because obviously, bigger libraries should have a larger stock and since you say they go dead after a certain time, it doesnt seem like it should matter where you are. You wont be returning any books!
     
  11. Mattsmom277

    Mattsmom277 Active Member

    I've always wondered that too Janet ... I know our library is slow catching up with digital books so we dont' have a program here at all.
    I do know that the digital copies for libraries get purchased a certain way. I believe I read an article once that explained a library can buy a book for loan for ereaders, and the license they get is specific ... ie. Can be loaned to x amount of people at any given time. It doesn't sound as if they have ability to loan a title unlimited, the same as real books, only can loan the amount of copies they buy. So maybe popular titles have 10 copies at a time to lend while others maybe only 2 etc.
    I'd be really curious to know what people are finding when borrowing via library. I've been curious about this forever!
     
  12. Marcie Mac

    Marcie Mac Just Plain Ole Tired

  13. Lothlorien

    Lothlorien Active Member Staff Member

    Janet, I don't have to go into my library. I already have a card. If you don't have a library card, get one. Once you have one, you can log into their website. While you are at the library getting your card, ask the library assistant to show you how to get to their website and find the downloadable bookds for your reader.
     
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