First Mtg. with- District 504/IEP Personnel Tomorrow

Discussion in 'Special Ed 101' started by MyGoosesMom, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. MyGoosesMom

    MyGoosesMom New Member

    Hi everyone.
    I just spent a relaxing 5 days at my best friend's house in VA Beach - no kids, no hubby - just us girls. NICE

    My PH was supposed to meet with the school last Thursday to discuss the Goose and ways to help him succeed, but it was cancelled...so we were rescheduling for next week.

    Yesterday the school's AP called to discuss and an issue Goose had with his teacher and said, "I don't agree with how this was handled, we need to have this meeting now to protect him."

    So--I have read up on the process, but I am still nervous.

    Are there certain modifications anyone here feels we should insist on trying to obtain? Are there approaches that have worked well that anyone wants to share?

    Just a nervous mom getting ready to hear people talk about the worst characteristics of my child and I am nervous.

    Thanks,
    Me
     
  2. Martie

    Martie Moderator

    Dear me,

    It's great you had a good vacation--

    We deal in acronyms here a lot but I am stumped. What is a PH and what is an AP?

    If your child does NOT have an IEP--(is eligible for special education) then this AP person is one of the few in a school district who understands and owns up to the fact that the MAIN benefit of Sp Ed qualification for some difficult children is the protection from undue suspensions and expulsion is NEVER allowed--at least not at age 9.

    I say this over and over, "get your kid qualified BEFORE middle school to protect him." Often those without IEPs are easily pushed out or expelled.

    The relevant question is, "Does your child have an IEP now?" I cannot respond beyond the basics without knowing the answer. If the answer is, "No," then go to the Getting Started thread in the Archives of Sp Ed 101. In brief, there needs to be an evaluation, the manner and content of which is prescribed by law, and it must be done within 60 days, unless your state says sooner. Then there will be a qualification meeting by the evaluation team--called by different names in different staes, but it is crucial that you understand you are a FULL member of the team that makes the decision. Hopefully if the AP person thinks difficult child should be qualified, you won't have to fight. Then an IEP addressing both behavioral and academic needs would be written. FIRST, he has to qualify.

    I have to go to work. I'll be back on tonight. Hopefully, Sheila or someone else will provide more details and links.

    Martie
     
  3. MyGoosesMom

    MyGoosesMom New Member

    Hi there.
    PH = Perfect Husband
    AP = Assistant Principal

    There is no IEP at the moment. The paperwork for the testing has been submitted. Additionally, we are awaiting a call from Texas Children's Hospital to see if we can get him in there faster and into some therapy as well.

    It has taken the major part of this school year to get everyone - the AP, the Principal, the teacher, the Special Education people - to get ODD through their heads. Everyone says they haven't dealt with it much and don't know much about it. And they are starting to get he isn't doing this to anyone.

    We are going to the meeting with info on ODD for the staff and will have to fight the Principal for a teacher shift as we have determined the combination of my son and this teacher is nothing but volital.

    Sarah
     
  4. Martie

    Martie Moderator

    Around here your PH is a husband (dear husband) LOL

    AP I have never seen outside the context of advanced placement.

    It is a bit late, but what you should have done is sent a CERTIFIED letter to the Superintendent of Schools requesting a initial evaluation that is complete and legally correct. The letter would start a 60 day time-line. Your school district's ignorance is not an excuse and they are violating your son's rights under [20 U.S.C § 1414 et seq.]

    Unless there is an evaluation, you cannot have a meeting, called by various names in different states, that will decide if your difficult child is a "student in need of special education." If he is, then an IEP will be written. You can suggest goals and objectives that you think are appropriate--the school district does not have to accept them, but in a well working IEP meeting, if they did not like yours, they would state why and propose alternatives. It is not legal for a school district to come to the meeting with the IEP written although it happens frequently.

    I just posted the link to the "Getting Stated Thread" for JJJ. It's on page 3 of the Archives of Sp Ed 101. If you strike out at this meeting, you need in my opinion to start reading up on law and make sure your school district follows it. It is a lot of work to learn law but many parents here are effective advocates for their difficult children.

    My favorite law site is http://www.wrightslaw.com It is both authoritative and parent friendly.

    Good luck with the meeting--let us know what happens.

    Martie

     
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