Getting a Diagnosis

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by Mandy, Dec 3, 2008.

  1. Mandy

    Mandy Parent In Training

    I am so ready to get a diagnosis for Cole, but since I have never been to or taken him to a psychiatrist I am not sure what to expect.

    How many sessions does it take to get a diagnosis?
    Will they prescribe medication right away?
    Can they diagnosis autism also?

    I know this isnt going to be a quick process but I just want to have a realistic timeline. I am sure you can relate to wanting that "cure" or at least help!!
     
  2. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    Is he already scheduled with a psychiatrist? If you're suspecting Autism that's usually not the best route to go unless you have heard from other parents that the specialist is skilled in the area of Autism diagnosis.

    Here's a thread about evaluations which should answer a lot of questions.

    http://www.conductdisorders.com/forum/showthread.php?t=337
     
  3. Mandy

    Mandy Parent In Training

    Thank you for the information! I am not really suspecting Autism but after researching so many things it could be I just want to make sure he comes out with the best diagnosis so we can start heading in the right direction. I have been researching Asbergers but I guess that's what happens when you are trying to diagnosis your child without being an actual doctor:D I think in a way I am mentally preparing myself for any outcome!
     
  4. KTMom91

    KTMom91 Well-Known Member

    As I remember, Miss KT had three sessions with a child psychiatrist. He gave me four copies of a behavior questionnaire, one for me, one for last year's teacher, one for this year's teacher, and I gave the fourth to my mom, since she spent lots of time with Miss KT.
     
  5. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    I would go with a neuropsychologist, not a psychiatrist. Too many psychiatrists misdiagnosed my son because they went by my word rather than actual testing. Testing isn't 100% accurate, but it's more accurate than just guessing and watching your kid for an hour. Young kids are hard to diagnose anyway. I'd want the most intensive evaluation available.
    Aspergers is on the autism spectrum. Many psychiatrists are clueless about it and call it ADHD or bipolar. Be careful. We had that.
     
  6. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    The reason that we are cautioning you from a psychiatrist as the primary diagnostician is because we've seen waaaaaaay too many parents come through here who used a psychiatrist first and came out with incomplete or inaccurate diagnoses. A psychiatrist can be an important part of a treatment team but the little ones really do need a more thorough evaluation involving more disciplines right up front.
     
  7. Mandy

    Mandy Parent In Training

    Thank you for all the information! Unfortunatly we also have to go by what our insurance will pay for. We only had a few options for child psychiatric's so we will see how this goes first and if I dont agree with a treatment plan or diagnosis I will definitly look into getting a neuropsychologist evaluation. done. We are doing a consult and testing all in one day because of the severity of his violent outbursts. Thanks again!!
     
  8. 30 and searching

    30 and searching New Member

    I read the question, "Will they prescribe medication?
    " They might, and if they do, I suggest for you to ask questions about the medication, and discuss it thoroughly with- the doctor. Also, do your own research on the medication. Some doctors are really good at prescribing good medications, and explaining possible side effects, and in general informing you. Others are not.
    I'm not trying to alarm you by any means. I'm just speaking of my past experience, that's all.
     
  9. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    A neuropsychologist, if she uses him, can't and won't prescribe medication. He pretty much tests to see what is wrong with the child. He tends to get a lot closer than regular therapists and even psychiatrists unless you get a lemon. 6-10 hours of intensive testing trumps an hour or so of listening to you, watching your kid, and pulling out the prescription pad.
     
  10. Mandy

    Mandy Parent In Training

    I have read the Bi-Polar child which lists abt. every medication out there with side effects, what it treats etc. It is very helpful explaining all the medications so that parents know what to expect. I definitly believe he will need medications due to the fact we have tried everything else out there. I have him on a gluten free, sugar free diet. I have been to herbalists, I have tried behavioral modification techniques listed in every book. This was the last resort for us, but he has to be able to function in the world. Thanks for all the information and I will keep you updated after his appointment.
     
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