Greenspain DIR Therapy

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by Wonderful Family, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. Is anyone familiar with the DIR/FLOORTIME MODEL and therapy (started by a guy by the name of Greenspan? The method is designed around kids on the autism spectrum - not bipolar necessarily. However, the issues seem to be pretty similar - particularly sensory issues and emotional regulation - two of my difficult child's biggest issue.
     
  2. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    Is that "Floortime?" I've heard of it on an autism site. Have you kids been diagnosed with anything?
     
  3. Yes, it's the Floortime therapy. I'm interested in hearing what/how they potentially work with young teenager - particularly with self-soothing techniques. difficult child can stop the rages with basic coping skills - but can't move past this point. All the distractions in the world never work for him . . . so it will be interesting to hear what they have to say.
     
  4. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

  5. smallworld

    smallworld Moderator

    Dr. Stanley Greenspan has written a lot of books about his theories, and there is also a "Floortime" video that you might be able to get from your library. However, most of the literature I've seen on "Floortime" has to do with babies and preschoolers. You might want to call Dr. Greenspan's office to get info on how "Floortime" might help a pre-teen.
     
  6. After the visit with the counselor last night, I thought it worth a quick update if anyone is interested.

    I do believe it's one of the first times that I have ever met a professional that "understood" my son outside of our psychiatrist. I'm truly hopeful for the first time in a long time that I might have stumbled across something; although I will always view everything related to difficult child with extreme caution.

    I've been very concerned about difficult child for sometime; although he is doing very well; they are all managed environments and set-up for him to do good. He still can't function in the day-to-day world.

    The general theory seems to be that some kids have "islands" of capabilities; but then can't make the connection to other situations. The very simplistic example given to me was a baby that is getting hungry and starts to fuss; versus some babies that don't cry for a bottle/food until they are starving. Since they don't recognize early hunger, they never learn what a little discomfort feels like (just one example). They don't learn many sensory and emotional skills - they just blow-up - or shut-down because they don't know how to respond; identify emotions, sensory seeking behavior, etc. Obviously, I have my own homework to do so that I can better understand everything.

    Sounds too simple, I know, but on the other hand - simple doesn't mean easy.

    It sounds like the general idea of therapy (after trust is established) is to put difficult child in situations that are uncomfortable and teach him the proper response; identifying where the deficits are and employing methods at home, school, and therapy to help him make the necessary connections; in ways not necessarily obvious to him.

    The end goal is to eventually have to stop changing and structuring the environment to suit/fit difficult child so much; he learns to adjust to the environment/situation around him instead.

    What I did find particularly interesting was how many of the types of activities that were mentioned yesterday that we stumbled on ourselves.

    I'll update as time goes on if it really looks like there will be some benefit. difficult child is also asking for homework and more challenging work at school now too. All in all, a good week for a change with some real promise for my family.
     
  7. smallworld

    smallworld Moderator

    I'm confused. What does this type of therapy have to do with "Floortime"? My understanding of "Floortime" is that it is very child centered and directed.
     
  8. My (limited) understanding is that this is the floortime model; but directed towards "floortime" for teens; with the goal of mastering skills that were missed in earlier developmental periods such as learning how to self-soothe, feel emotions, and the like. It's quite probable that any explanations that I've given our not the best. We'll see how works, of course. It sounds a lot like a form of CBT I did many years ago as a teen with ADHD.
     
  9. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    Tbis sounds really interesting. I like the idea. I'm going to look into it.

    It sounds like the general idea of therapy (after trust is established) is to put difficult child in situations that are uncomfortable and teach him the proper response; identifying where the deficits are and employing methods at home, school, and therapy to help him make the necessary connections; in ways not necessarily obvious to him.

    The end goal is to eventually have to stop changing and structuring the environment to suit/fit difficult child so much; he learns to adjust to the environment/situation around him instead.
     
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