IEP, BIP, this is all new

Discussion in 'Special Ed 101' started by crazymama30, Mar 15, 2007.

  1. crazymama30

    crazymama30 Active Member

    Well, we just got done with conferences, difficult child did good academically, but poorly in PE and Music, and failed all social skills grades. He has an IEP for speech, and I would like to add some other interventions. The school gave me parental permission to exchange information. They said this gives them and psychiatrist permission to communicate. This sounds good to me, but I wanted to run it by you experienced ones.


    Now on to interventions. difficult child has problems with overstimulation, unstructured times, and transitions. He has been in fights, been suspended, and gets physical with others easily. He does not follow directions. Lots of problems on the bus. What kind of interventions can I ask for, what have you all had good luck with?
     
  2. Martie

    Martie Moderator

    I would NEVER, EVER allow direct communication between a private therapist and the school. Some schools play fast and loose with confidentiality--and once you give permission, anything is fair game. Here is what I did:

    Any private evaluations came directly to me. After I reviewed them, if I chose to, I would forward them to the school. Often what I had from an outside evaluator contradicted what the school district wanted to believe, so I usually released--but not always.

    A verbal exchange is very problematic to me because there is no written record of the information exchanged. School personnel can SAY the psychiatrist said thus and so and you have no way to refute it. What I would do instead is to ask the treating psychiatrist or therapist to write a summary of difficult child's situation, current diagnosis's, medications (if you want--you don't have to release this information), treatment goals, needed school supports if psychiatrist has an opinion, etc. Have psychiatrist send it to the school but you keep a copy. If the school has additional questions, have them submit them to the psychiatrist in writing. If you are extra paranoid, have them give them to you to give to the psychiatrist. Keep a copy in either event--and get a copy of the answers.

    I once released to the school a written IEE (at parent expense) that CLEARLY and unambiguously stated that ex-difficult child was neither Learning Disability (LD) nor ADHD--to the contrary, attention control was a major strength for him. I overheard a teacher make reference to ex-difficult child having Learning Disability (LD) and ADHD. I asked her where she got the information. She was a nice person and genuinely believed what she was saying--"someone" who had seen the report relayed the information. I gave her a copy of the evaluation for her very own. She was quite competent and was embarrassed that she had relied on this other person.

    Think how much worse the above would have been if it had been a verbal exchange with no way to establish what was "really" said. I offered copies of this evaluation to all teachers--just to embarrass the person who was spreading false rumors. What could I have done if those rumors were based on "Dr. X said, ...."? Nothing.

    Just my .02

    Martie

     
  3. Sheila

    Sheila Moderator

    I have never withheld a private evaluation from the school district, but I learned the hard way to keep tight control over communication between school district and private professionals. Under no circumstances do I allow direct communication with-difficult child's private professionals without personally being in the meeting or involved in the conference call.

    In school year 2001-2002, difficult child was having horrible problems in school -- and I had had enough. In January 2002 he had been denied an IEP because he was "making good grades" and his behaviors were strictly due to "willfulness and lack of structure in the home." They were about to put my kid in the hospital. I could get zero help from the school. This is how it played out. (Excerpts from emails; Dr. D was difficult child's psychologist.)

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">From: Mom
    Sent: Wednesday, April 17, 2002 4:01 AM
    To: Principal
    Cc: Dr. D; Asst. Principal
    Subject: Discpline Appeal regarding 04-16-02 suspension

    I received a telephone call from Ms. Asst. Principal today regarding difficult child and Steven fighting in PE. I do not recall exactly the punishment she said that she was going to assess for difficult child -- something like the remainder of today in BIC and suspended for two days. I told her this is unacceptable. She advised I would need to send a letter to you within 48 hours, so here it is.

    I am quite frustrated and distressed with all this. It has only been in the last few days that difficult child has returned to consistently sleeping in his bed rather than on the floor of his room or ours, has not been soiling his underwear, stopped having nightmares, and can get to sleep at a reasonable time -- all due to from the last incident of 5 or 6 days in BIC. My son can not be educated when he is not in the classroom. Reviewing all of difficult child's referrals to the office, it appears that the majority of these type problems come into play when there is a substitute present and/or difficult child is in an unstructured environment.

    If you will review the discipline referrals, I believe it will also become obvious to you that more than "willfulness" is going on.

    From where I am sitting, this is what I see:

    I have:
    * asked in writing for a Functional Behavioral Analysis to be done -- ignored.
    * tried to explain about difficult child's auditory processing problems -- ignored.
    * tried to explain about difficult child's sensory problems -- ignored.
    * tried to relay his performance anxieties -- ignored.
    * tried to explain about his receptive and expressive language problems -- ignored.
    * tried to explain the emotional problems related to school -- ignored.
    * tried to relay information related to ADHD -- either ignored or not understood.
    * tried to explain about difficult child's fine motor problems in his writing hand -- ignored.
    * asked for social skills training -- ignored.
    * tried to give XISD personnel enough information to understand difficult child's first five years of life while still protecting as much of his privacy as possible -- ignored or affects not understood.
    * tried to relay the best ways I have found to handle difficult child's behaviors -- ignored or misused.
    *asked that Dr. D be contacted for consultation -- to the best of my knowledge, this has not happened yet.

    I do not care about cookie-cutter procedures for administering discipline; they are not appropriate for our son. I care about positive redirection and reinforcement.

    The more I learn about things, the more I come to understand how a lot neurological problems overlap and the challenges they present. I do not know how to explain this to XISD, and based on past experience, it would not be given any credence anyway. I do care that somebody, somewhere with XISD understand all the factors difficult child deals with and has the expertise to relay the information and proper handling to pertinent personnel. I do care that my son is overseen at all times by appropriately trained personnel and that he receives the support he requires which will give him the opportunity to be educated without unnecessary struggle and further damage to his self-esteemÂ….

    In any event, on Thursday and Friday I will be out of town. I am not going to change my plans because of the suspension -- it is my opinion it is inappropriate punishment. I do not approve of it, I will not condone it, nor will I be utilized as an instrument in carrying it out. If it were my ultimate decision, difficult child would be presented at school Thursday morning because it is a school day, and it is a necessity that he be present in the classroom in order to learn and keep up with the curriculum. Further, I am not going to be put in the position of having to hire a babysitter when difficult child is suppose to be attending school because appropriate interventions have not been implemented. Nor will I hire a tutor of some sort that can "teach" the assignments sent home because he's not in the classroom and I'm not available to help him. Why? Because I firmly believe the majority of incidences resulting in discipline referrals could have been avoided if appropriate measures were in place starting many months back -- this one included. I've been told repeatedly there is "no problem" of any "significance" at school so I am looking to XISD to appropriately handle these "non-problems."

    At this time I do not know what husband's intentions are relating to school on Thursday.

    Well, just as I predicted to Ms. Asst. Principal during our telephone conversation. It's 3:00 a.m. and difficult child was up with a nightmare at 2:30 a.m. He's now sleeping on the living room floor because he is "scared." Besides my son's emotional upset, I strongly suspect our household can look forward to another 3 to 4 week bout of repercussions from insignificant, non-problems as a result of the latest non-event.

    I am quite concerned about this. I'll be home late tomorrow afternoon. Please expedite your response. I don't recall that I ever received a reply to my last letter regarding the incident resulting in 5 or 6 days in BIC before and after Spring Break. I would appreciate hearing from you by the end of the business day tomorrow.</div></div>

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">To: Mom
    Sent: Thursday, April 18, 2002 4:40 PM
    Subject: RE: Discpline Appeal regarding 04-16-02 suspension

    Sheila:

    I talked to Mrs. Asst Superintendent today about your appeal, our handling of this incident, etc. She agreed that difficult child was under the regular disciple plan with standard consequences.

    I also talked to Dr. D. She said difficult child needs to be responsible for his behavior.

    Ms. Principal
    </div></div>

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">From: Mom
    Sent: Friday, April 19, 2002 11:06 PM
    To: Dr. D
    Subject: Discpline Appeal regarding 04-16-02 suspension

    I received the e-mail above from Ms. Principal regarding difficult child being expelled from school. I'd like to hear your side of the conversation.

    Sheila
    </div></div>

    Excerpt from Dr. D's response to me.

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">INTERESTING! I DID say that, among a lot of other, much more instructive (I hoped) things! She didn't even ask me about the suspension (I assumed that was because she didn't call me back until Thursday afternoon--They were having TAAS) -- we talked about his special needs, that I did believe that he had a central auditory processing problem and sensory motor integration problems that were directly affecting his behavior, and if they weren't already, would be negatively affecting his grades.

    I recommended that they reconsider desginating him as a "handicapped" student, based on Other Health Impairment (ADD & perceptual processing problems) and give him the full benefit of special education.

    I recommended that they also take a look at him in a psychological evaluation that included the kinds of psychological tests that could help look at difficult child's underlying issues. I told her that just looking at behavior rating scales and interviewing would not provide any more helpful information than they already had, which did not take into consideration difficult child's underlying issues and his first five years.

    I emphasized that difficult child needed more than the kind of discipline accorded a regular student, and that we needed to work together (with you and husband) to find a way to serve him more appropriately, and help you two feel that they were going to meet his needs.

    Dr. D
    </div></div>

    In the 2004-2005 school year, difficult child was re-evaluated by the school district after much more "to do" and at parent request. He was deemed eligible for an IEP. One of the things they wanted in his IEP was direct contact between difficult child's private professionals without having me involved. No way.

    It's written into his IEP that I will coordinate and participate in all contacts. Haven't had a request for coordinating a meeting or conference call to date.
     
  4. crazymama30

    crazymama30 Active Member

    So far the school has been great, I have way more problems with the bus drivers. The only teacher I really dislike like is the PE teacher. If it gets too bad, I will somehow get him removed from PE if I have to go get him every day.



    So what kinds of things can I request on an IEP? He has no problems academically, some problems with taking standardized tests so I know I can ask that he take them with an adult in a quiet place somewhere. What about behavior stuff? He mainly has problems in PE,Music,recess,lunch & breakfast, and the bus.
     
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