IEP diagnosis Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) of Pddnos & ADHD

Discussion in 'Special Ed 101' started by lolita, Jan 26, 2012.

  1. lolita

    lolita New Member

    Afternoon, I am new here and have a few questions. My son is in the 5th grade and will tranisition to the 6th grade middle school next year. I FINALLY have received a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), PDDNOS and ADHD from the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at the Children's National Medical Center. My son has been having issues in school K, 1,2,3 & 4th grade. To include a 2 week stay in a pysch hospital.

    My son does NOT have a IEP or 504 in place. In the past I have attending many child study team meetings and he had been not found qualified for Special Education Services. HE DIDN'T HAVE A diagnosis THEN..


    NOW I have a diagnosis from a reputable instituion. or I think?

    My questions are

    1. Do you think he qualifies for the IEP and not the 504? I do..but want to verify.?? especially from other parents that have been down this road.

    2. Will the school accept my 15 page Neuropsychological evaluation from this institution, or will they do their own evaluation?

    School did a speech evaluation in the past then came back and said "DOESNT QUALIFY FOR Special Education SERVICE"

    3. On his evaluation the Dr. has listed 4 pages of Recommendations. So will they 'say" the dr. recommended this? We don't have to follow this?

    My son gets Honor roll now since he is on medications however he has alot of issues. ie. social, executive function disabliities, speech/language/pragmatic issues. emotional behavioral issues, & sensory processing disorder (SPD).

    4. The dr. specifically wrote given his diagnosis of an Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and the educational impact of related symptom social & executive fuction disabilities he qualifies for Special Education SERVICES.

    Bottom line. Do you guys think I have a chance of getting him an IEP?

    6. I'm trying to decide if I should get an advocate what do you suggest?

    I was thinking to write the letter to request for a meeting to discuss his new diagnosis. Go to the meeting, if they say IEP, then I made it over the first hurdle. IF not then get an advocate to push for an IEP.

    Bottom line $700 is what the advocate wanted. $250 bucks an hr. I don't have the $ for that right now. Especially since I just shelled out $3,000 to get my son an independent evaluation from this hospital.
     
  2. buddy

    buddy New Member

    The school must consider your evaluation but is mandated to follow the criteria set forth to qualify for special education services. For example, when my son received his diagnosis of Autism, he was then recategorized on his IEP under Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) (school must use Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) they do not use the various Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) diagnosis that the medical community uses... all of them go under Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) by federal definition)

    They did not re-do the testing and used the observations as support for the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) category. They also added their own observations and testing as needed, they recorded that they had verified and documented how it impacted him etc.


    All states specifically define nad explain it a little differently but it is from federal mandates and definitions so it will be similar everywhere.... soon the medical community will use Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) (because the DSM label is changing and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) will include autism, aspergers, etc. as in the schools though the wording is a little different)
    Here is an explanation from the WISC Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) eligibility criteria:

    This is I think from the national association of school psychologists:

     
  3. lolita

    lolita New Member

    Thanks for your reply. I heard the DSM is changing and dropping AS and PDDNOS.... So I guess all Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) diagnosis will be just considered Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). I guess I am wondering if they would give me a hard time in implementing an IEP vs a 504. I feel he qualifies for the IEP. I guess I am dreading the meeting cus I feel I'm gonna have to fight them tooth & nail etc. It's so frustrating esp since I have been scouring the web and read the other stories that other parents have been through. uggh
     
  4. lolita

    lolita New Member

    In addition, I am thinking he also qualifies under OHI for ADHD?
     
  5. buddy

    buddy New Member

    Truly depends on the education level and political machine that is your school district. He should be eligible because as the quotes I gave explain, the fact is it is a known neurological condition that affects the child across a wide range of abilities that influence school performance.

    How is this affecting your child in the educational setting

    1. socially
    2. academically
    3. behaviorally


    symptoms that are associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) will be useful to have handy to explain how this is impacting your difficult child's needs...

    does he have processing challenges?
    does he misinterpret social situations, non verbal expressions, or is too rigid to handle situations when rules change, schedules change, things pop up and planned events are cancelled, etc...
    does he have friends in school? Is he included in group discussions equally, can he negotiate social situations? Can he do well in gym, free time situations, lunch, hall way transitions?
    can he organize himself and does he turn assignments in etc.?
    does he need to take breaks because of outbursts and/or anxiety issues?
    Does he need training to gain skills in these areas?
    does he have sensory issues that need to be addressed especially in assemblies, noisy classrooms, with lunch room or gym smells, or waking in lines where he may be touched accidentally?

    All these things can be used to document his qualifying for an IEP.

    Make it clear that you will only accept an IEP and act as if...meaning you want to discuss setting up an IEP for your child because he qualifies as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and needs specific instruction and accommodations in the school setting.

    If they resist, get an advocate.

    I am sure others here will be able to give you ideas for how they got services too. I dont know where you are from and I know my area best of course... and within a state, each school and school district is different depending on the prevailing attitude of the pushiest staff people there... sad to say. but technically, I am sure most of us would say, yes he qualifies so dont let them push you away.

    (If you happen to have one of those kids who is Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) not otherwise specified and really does great in school and is happy at whatever social level they function, that may be a different story of course.... but I doubt that is true for you or you would not be asking for the IEP in the first place)


    He may be put under OHI (other health impaired) for the ADHD... again they will have to use your medical information.

    Kids can have a primary and secondary disability category. Often speech and language is a secondary. My son has Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) as primary with speech/language AND OHI (acquired brain injury) as secondaries. If a child does not meet criteria for speech and language they can still get services thru the "related services" rules which means that speech/language/communication issues are a known symptom of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) (as are Occupational Therapist (OT) issues) so if a documented issue is listed, they can receive services thru the Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) and Occupational Therapist (OT)... it may be indirect services or direct or consultative.
     
  6. buddy

    buddy New Member

    I just re read your first post...sorry..

    So, if he has nothing in place you must put in writing...and send it certified mail to get a return receipt, that you want your child to be evaluated for special education services.

    You can also call but make sure you do the written so if anyone puts your call note on the side of a desk, the clock will still be ticking because htey must respond to you in a legally prescribed amount of time.
     
  7. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Hi, and welcome.

    Before you start the IEP process... I'd strongly recommend that you go through all of your documentation... teachers comments, report cards, examples of work, as well as all prior evaluations.

    Next, see if you can put together a parent report. Its not called "exactly" that, but you'll find a good sample format under Site Help and Resources. This forces you to think through the history, and have it all in front of you.

    THEN... get help from the incrediblly experienced warrior moms around here on how to word the request, who to send it to, how to send it, and all the other steps...
     
  8. lolita

    lolita New Member

    Thanks. I live in Virginia. I had planned on sending a letter via certified and return receipt etc. Who do I send the letter to? Principle, Schoolboard members, and Director of Special Education? Or will one person suffice? I'm not going to call I thought the letter would be ok? How many days do they have to respond? Is it 30?

    does he have processing challenges? YES

    does he misinterpret social situations, non verbal expressions, or is too rigid to handle situations when rules change, schedules change, things pop up and planned events are cancelled, etc...YES. ALWAYS....

    does he have friends in school? NOT REALLY

    Is he included in group discussions equally, can he negotiate social situations? NO

    Can he do well in gym, free time situations, lunch, hall way transitions? NO GOT PUNCHED LAST WEEK AT LUNCH BY ANOTHER STUDENT.

    can he organize himself and does he turn assignments in etc.? HAS TO BE TOLD OVER N OVER TO ORGANIZE.

    does he need to take breaks because of outbursts and/or anxiety issues? YES, am always redirecting him.

    Does he need training to gain skills in these areas? YES

    does he have sensory issues that need to be addressed especially in assemblies, noisy classrooms, with lunch room or gym smells, or waking in lines where he may be touched accidentally? YES

    Sound, Sight, Smell issues, Clothing. etc.. He wears earplugs to sleep, eye mask to sleep. has issues w clothing and has 10 blankets on bed to sleep.


    I planned to go into the first meeting and see what they offer. "IF" they offer a 504 I PLAN to be very firm on my desicion for an IEP. If they still try to not approve it etc..I will NOT sign anything and THEN retain an advocate. Does that sound ok?

    Why do the school system makes this difficult on us..uggh...Great advice from you! I was already told from the school pysch a few yrs ago that he would not qualify for an evaluation from the school due to "IT" not affecting him ACADEMICALLY....Thanks for breaking it down for me!
     
  9. buddy

    buddy New Member

    Send the letter to his school principal AND to the director of special education. You could call the sp ed. department and find out if there is a specific Special Education. coordinator for your son's school. That is equally a good person to address the sp. ed. letter to.

    And while they are getting ready you get all of this stuff organized. Years of academic and school social struggle. There should be NO REASON not to get this child into a program for kids with similar issues... every district calls it something else and with in teach program kids get different levels of support, some have a resource room they can go to , some stay there for most of the day but leave for a gen. ed. class sometimes, some have a aide that helps to support in gen. ed. etc.... you get the idea.

    You sound like you have unlimited documentation and this should be a slam dunk. But step one, get the letter out asap.
     
  10. buddy

    buddy New Member

    If you have not gone thru their version of a child study team yet or an evaluation it is mandated. Really for some areas the evaluation is really a review of existing data and should not take long but for this, it likely will require some testing and use of your supporting info to document the reason for teh IEP. IF they did bypass this, they could be audited and lose funds.

    Do not just sit back and wait for the meeting. You will have to go thru the evaluation process, then they should give you teh report BEFORE the meeting to discuss the results and some districts like to write a draft IEP right at the results meeting.

    If they deny services after the evaluation you have rights. You can ask for an independent evaluation at the school districts expense with a private agency. With your documentation, they will see that they have expert testimony that they will not be able to refute.

    they missed the boat on your kiddo and should be ashamed but go in with the attitude that you are pleased to share results with them that will help what you realize is (sorry dripping with sarcasm here, but be sincere) a tricky thing to sort through, but you are sure they will be pleased to know the results of this evaluation.


    Do the formal writing and mailing for sure...

    But, depending on your comfort level, you can actually also meet with the principal and say that you have great news. You know now why difficult child is struggling so and let him know you have started the formal process of obtaining Special Education services. You just want him to know what is going on so that he can be aware that you are willing to help them as much as possible in thier work to develop his IEP.
     
  11. lolita

    lolita New Member

    ok Buddy! Thanks so much for this info. I guess my main concern was wondering "if"I did have a slam dunk in receiving an IEP vs 504. This school has "jerked" me around in the past so I figured that I would go with-o an advocate first. "IF" I feel they will give me a hard time etc..They last resort I'll pay for the advocate etc in round two. YES there is a specific Special Education director at the school via the website states etc..

    Years of academic and school social struggle..
    I already have a BOOK ready to go!
     
  12. buddy

    buddy New Member

    I will contribute to the writing and will buy a copy!
     
  13. lolita

    lolita New Member

    haha..One more thing. Do I give them along w the letters the recent 15 page diagnosis?

    OR All his medical history! Cus if it were to be all then I have a HUGE book for them from pysch hospital, Psychitrists, Psychologists, and the newest from the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) hospital?
     
  14. buddy

    buddy New Member

    Give them nothing yet..... in my humble opinion.

    Unless you have a one page diagnosis that says he has Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified and ADHD. You can make a statement that he was diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified and ADHD at xyz clinics etc...

    Telll them you are willing to provide documentation when the assessment plan is signed. Record review is part of the assessment.

    I would be VERY careful about what you give them. I would not give them anything that could lead them down an emotional and behavioral category if you feel the Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)/ADHD issues are correct (by the way, adhd symptoms are often part of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), but if medications help, great... then may actually be adhd too...)

    Kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) who are treated through emotional and behavioral methods instead of direct teaching, autism methods can really suffer. The beauty of knowing if it is more Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), is that there are really well known, evidence based methods to teach these kids to help work on the neurological issues.

    EBD has its own specialized teaching and behavioral modification methods. They are wonderful but different. OF course there is some overlap and some kids can do ok with either, but I would avoid it at all costs. I have witnessed too many problems both professionally and personally.
     
  15. lolita

    lolita New Member

    Give them nothing yet..... in my humble opinion. ok

    Unless you have a one page diagnosis that says he has Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified and ADHD. yes this report states that. I have the 15 page report from the Neuropsychological evaluation from the center for autism spectrum disorders children's national medical center that states: evaluation procedures, school report, previous evaluations, birth history, evaluation findings, summary & impressions, and the RECOMMENDATIONS: Their Recommendations are 4 pages alone. and the evaluation test scores.

    You can make a statement that he was diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified and ADHD at xyz clinics etc...

    Telll them you are willing to provide documentation when the assessment plan is signed. Assessment plan? you mean the IEP?

    Record review is part of the assessment.

    I would be VERY careful about what you give them. I would not give them anything that could lead them down an emotional and behavioral category if you feel the Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)/ADHD issues are correct. yes I feel the Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)/adhd is correct.

    (by the way, adhd symptoms are often part of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), but if medications help, great... then may actually be adhd too...) with-O a doubt he has ADHD. He can't function with-o his medications.
     
  16. buddy

    buddy New Member

    NOPE, they MUST do an "assessment" and you must sign off on it in order for them to document that he is eligible for the IEP.

    That is step one. No one can just have an IEP without an assessment but what that assessment looks like varies. Since you have much testing already done they should be willing to accept what you have to help document what they need to document.

    It is just procedure, they would lose funds if they gave IEP's to kids without an assessment to show how they are qualifying the child for the IEP. No way around it.

    That is why for this first letter that is just to start the federal/state time clock ticking... just make is short and sweet. You want an evaluation for special education services. In this case, since you have the private evaluations and if you agree with them, you can say that you believe your child will qualify for services under Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and OHI (each state might vary the acronym a tiny bit so check) for his ADHD. You have a complete evaluation from XYZ stating that he is diagnosis with ___________________, and since your child is struggling in school you would like to begin special education services.

    This is simply a formality.

    The clock starts ticking and you will be notified either that they will refuse the assesment (must be in writing and why) or they will do it. IF they will do it then you are to be included in the planning. the case manager will call you and let you know what is being proposed (or they may have you come in for the planning) and you can discuss what you have and what they need to do.

    they must tic all the boxes to show they are legally qualifying their child so it is not to be a pain to you, but it IS a pain in situations like yours where they have denied services for so long.

    IF they deny an evaluation you appeal. There are usually free advocates so make sure you call your state dept of ed and find out where you can get a Special Education advocate. PACER.org might have a listing of advocates in other states... they are in MN but consult across the country and have set up in other states.... I am pretty sure Utah has them and others???


    Once the plan is signed they have X number of days to complete the evaluation (federal I think may even be 60 but in my state they legislated a shorter time...30) At the end of that they must schedule a meeting and you review the results. then they deny or write the IEP.



    I think you are in good standing but sadly you still have to go thru the motions. In the schools where I have worked this would be a slam dunk, and we would be happy you did so much work! But, sadly it seems like this district has not heard you well so hopefully this will be your turn around.
     
  17. lolita

    lolita New Member

    ok got it! I need to print this all out. Its alot to digest. uggh..:) But thank you for breaking it down to me. :) I wonder what their assessment consist of? They did do one in the past. It was speech evaluation and they found him not qualified for Special Education service..then I never heard nothing else. I kept taking him to many doctors. to get evaluated until I took him to the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) hospital.
     
  18. buddy

    buddy New Member

    this time say you want a COMPLETE educational evaluation to include academic, ability, communication, motor, behavior and health.

    you can find information that is probably way more clear than I say things on


    Advocacy - What you Should Know About Evaluations by Robert K. Crabtree, Esq. - Wrightslaw

    here is an excerpt from one of their pages: (a re-evaluation is done after they are on an IEP so no worries they already evaluated and denied services, this is a new initial evaluation)


    The law about the requirement to evaluate if requested by the child's parent is clear and unambiguous:
    "A State educational agency, other State agency, or local educational agency [school district] shall conduct a full and individual initial evaluation ... either the parent of a child, or a State education agency, other State agency, or local educational agency may initiate a request for an initial evaluation to determine if the child is a child with a disability." 20 USC 1414(a)(1)
    In the section about Child Find, you learn:
    "All children with disabilities residing in the state, including children with disabilities attending private schools, regardless of the severity of their disabilities, and who are in need of special education and related services, are identified, located, and evaluated . . ." (20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(3))
    Parent Requests Evaluation of a Child Who Receives Special Education Service Under an IEP
    If the child is receiving special education services under an IEP, the child's progress should be monitored frequently. It's hard to imagine a school taking the position that "testing would not provide information relevant to the child's educational planning." If the school doesn't use test results, how can they make rational decisions about the child's educational needs?
    Evaluation Results
    You asked, "Does the school have to provide information from testing?" Yes. The child's parents are entitled to receive copies of all evaluations and test scores.

     
  19. lolita

    lolita New Member

    ok got it. COMPLETE educational evaluation to include academic, ability, communication, motor, behavior and health. I will put that in my letter.

    That sucks.. Since he has been completly evaluated by the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) hospital. I guess by law they have to do a complete evaluation themselves? In addition to the one I have. uggh..

     
  20. buddy

    buddy New Member

    yes, because each disability area has criteria for entrance and they have to show where the money is spent and why. They are audited.

    So if he is to qualify for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), they have to show that there are X, Y Z assessments (and they can use the ones you have provided which should shorten things up) and they have to document that it affects him in the school setting by teacher report, parent report, observations, review of school records etc..... and you have ALL of that but it has to be recorded in a SCHOOL evaluation.

    So some of it may just be transferred but some things may need to be done.
     
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