Just got off the phone with the Psychologist...

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by Chaosuncontained, Dec 2, 2011.

  1. Chaosuncontained

    Chaosuncontained New Member

    She told me she would have a copy of the report sent home with Carson Monday afternoon. She asked if I want to hear a little of what she had...?

    Ummm, YEAH! She told me he qualified under Special Education two ways. #1 OHI...ADHD #2 Emotional Disability--she said something about his frontal lobe (?) and said he showed depression and very low self esteem. She said he was very smart but that his IQ score fluctuated quite a bit. On the high end of average, the low end of average or Superior in different areas.

    She said that a LPC would be going to the school for counseling session with Carson. She will work on teaching Carson skills. He didn't show he was able to: self monitor, initiate work and have emotional control.

    We talked about his problem with writitng and she asked me if I thought having him TYPE his work would help. I told her it was definatley worth a good try.

    She told me how much she enjoyed working and talking with Carson. He tested high in Reading and low in Math (uhhh, yeah).

    I had to get off the phone... but she did say was sending the report--so, I'll be able to read over it more Monday afternoon. Then the meeting is Tuesday...
     
  2. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    I'm always interested to hear results, too. Congrats on getting some solid info.
    What is OHI?
     
  3. Chaosuncontained

    Chaosuncontained New Member

    Other Health Impairment.
     
  4. buddy

    buddy New Member

    In advance, I am going to apologize, I should go thru your posts to see if you have already addressed this so I am just going to go for it...smile

    Have you had him evaluated specifically for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)/Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)? Kids on the spectrum typically show wide ranges on IQ testing... especially can show strengths in "verbal" skills (like reading). The pattern, rather than the exact numbers is what is looked at. It is only one piece, and certainly other disability areas can reveal wide ranging scores, but given his other issues....just asking.

    I know we have said it here many times, and there are many examples on this board...of kids who are diagnosis adhd, odd, anxiety, etc... and in the end the unbrella diagnosis is Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

    In any event, it is wonderful news that he will be on an IEP and if the accomodations are individual enough it wont matter as much what the category is...as time goes on if you feel there is more to it though, you might want to check further just to make sure because accomodations for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) come faster when people are already in that mode of thinking for a child.

    ADHD is covered under OHI.... it is a catch all category for medical conditions that are not covered under any of the specific educational categories. (that is what Q's ABI is under... since Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is the only educaitonal category for brain injury...sigh).

    Will be so excited to hear what supports and teaching they are going to offer. Congrats again! You did it!!!
     
  5. buddy

    buddy New Member

    Oh I missed this. The frontal lobe is the area of our brains that controls "executive functions". Any time you talk about impulse and adhd type of symptoms you will likely hear people talk about frontal lobe development or dysfunction.

    "The frontal lobes are considered our emotional control center and home to our personality. There is no other part of the brain where lesions can cause such a wide variety of symptoms (Kolb & Wishaw, 1990). The frontal lobes are involved in motor function, problem solving, spontaneity, memory, language, initiation, judgement, impulse control, and social and sexual behavior."
     
  6. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    Sounds awesome. I am glad you will be able to look it over before the meeting. I, personally, would let them categorize him under OHI. My reasoning is if they go under EBD, they will focus too much on the behaviors and not as much emphasis teaching him the lacking skills. At least that what happens here.

    As for the typing, I would ask for them to use a voice-recognition software for him. Typing is actually slower and more tedious than writing for kids with ADHD. difficult child 1 has such a hard time even typing because his hands, period, don't go as fast as his brain. The program we (and the school) use is called Dragon Naturally Speaking. It types everything difficult child 1 says. There are some minor glitches where certain words aren't in the program's dictionary but they can be added. It has helped difficult child 1 tremendously. He knows what he wants to write but can't seem to put it into writing AND not as fast as his brain goes. There's an idea to include in the IEP.
     
  7. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Voice recognition software works for SOME kids. Typing works for others. And still others do better with a scribe.

    Given that 50% of kids with ADHD also have Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD)... if there are fine motor skills challenges at all, any of the above options will be an improvement over writing. It doesn't really matter which one they try first. difficult child has access to all three, but HATES voice-recognition... so he uses typing for classes like English where there's lots of writing, lots of drafts etc.... and scribe for things like math and science...

    Put all three on the table. Start with one of them... if that doesn't solve the problem, try the next one - alone or in combo...
     
  8. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    I was just looking at Carson's age and know the frustration difficult child 1 had (and still does) about his hands being so small and then also trying to memorize where the keys are. For us, it was much less frustrating.
     
  9. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Depends on what they give him for technology - our difficult child starting learning typing in grade 2... but his first practical system was grade 5 - an alphasmart. The keyboard is a bit smaller than standard...

    BUT... if he hasn't started learning keyboarding already, it will take him a year to catch up... will need time specifically to learn to type properly (typing tutor programs etc.) - and that needs to be filtered into his day.

    In which case, they need to start with one other options...

    *** remember - technology doesn't SOLVE the problem - its just another tool ***
    Whether its typing, or voice recognition - even if its a person doing the scribing - its still just a tool.
     
  10. susiestar

    susiestar Roll With It

    Wiz did wonderfully with an alphasmart. He is dysgraphic and it makes writing a real challenge and also physically painful. I was astounded by how durable the alphasmart was.

    Please get him evaluated for sensory issues and dysgraphia by an Occupational Therapist (OT). School probably CAN do it, but if you can get it done privately the results will show a lot more. Schools look only at what will impact school life and a private Occupational Therapist (OT) will look for how it impacts difficult child's entire life. thank you has actually come to the point where he doesn't mind writing and that is HUGE because he refused to use crayons, markers, etc..... for years.

    I am glad that Carson qualifies for the IEP! If you don't have an advocate, this would be a good time to get one. They can be very helpful, esp if school balks at providing what Carson needs.
     
  11. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    I like OHI. It is the most flexible category and can be tweaked for the specific child rather than any one disorder. It has worked very well for Sonic! Glad you got some help and hope. Yes, getting the school to acknowledge and intervene is both help and hope! :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011
  12. buddy

    buddy New Member

    Every program can be individualized. If a child truly has a learning style or needs accommodations that match a licensure area it does make a huge difference. I hate it when general Special Education teachers (Learning Disability (LD) or whatever) work with my Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) son. EBD teachers for him are the worst....they are great people but truly have a different teaching style..... Many times schools that have autism teachers have a lot of equipment available that they dont ahve to reorder etc...swings, figits etc...so they can quickly grab stuff.

    That said, I would hesitate in this case though to use EBD instead of OHI for the adhd.... I think from what you have said, OHI for teh adhd sounds like his primary need and the EBD stuff is probably really symptoms of the struggles that come with the difficulties he is having.

    just mho
     
  13. Chaosuncontained

    Chaosuncontained New Member


    She did say that he qualified for an IEP under Special Education for two reasons. She said #1 was OHI for his ADHD and that the second was for Emotional Disability. She also "warned" me that although they had a lot of things planned for Carson and that we would see results...it would take a while. SHe asked that we be patient.
     
  14. buddy

    buddy New Member

    Usually they do a primary disability category and a secondary so it will be interesting to see what they say....

    I am so happy for you that you dont have to push for this, that they did not say 504 plan etc. Or worse, just dismiss your concerns. It is going to be such a good thing to have him receive help from people who understand. He will feel it too. Very few kids want to be in trouble or have such stressful days every week. And I still, even with the admin issues I am having, truly believe most sp. ed teachers go into this to really do a good thing, and really do try to help. Once you get thru the red tape and they are with the ones that will be working with them, we do usually see improvement. There is tons to hope for, and yeah sure , we need patience, but it is still such a relief. You have done an amazing job
     
  15. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    Okay, where's the "like" button? :)

    ******************

    she said something about his frontal lobe (?) Oh I missed this. The frontal lobe is the area of our brains that controls "executive functions". Any time you talk about impulse and adhd type of symptoms you will likely hear people talk about frontal lobe development or dysfunction.

    "The frontal lobes are considered our emotional control center and home to our personality. There is no other part of the brain where lesions can cause such a wide variety of symptoms (Kolb & Wishaw, 1990). The frontal lobes are involved in motor function, problem solving, spontaneity, memory, language, initiation, judgement, impulse control, and social and sexual behavior."
     
  16. STRESSEDTOMAX

    STRESSEDTOMAX Member

    I'm happy for you too. I have had such a hard time with Tommy's school getting him the IEP I know he needs. they are finally retesting him now.
     
  17. Chaosuncontained

    Chaosuncontained New Member


    Wow, I don't know your complete story, but from what I recently read I would think Tommy would qualifu under OHI or maybe the "emotional disturbance" part to recieve an IEP. I'll be sending good thoughts to you that it happens.

    Tommy sounds a lot like Carson--though Carson has never been hospitalized or had to be escorted home by the Police for a rage.

    I recently had Carson evaluated by another Psychologist (not the school one) and they mentioned ODD. Though I don't have the report yet.

    This is all so hard, isn't it? HUGS
     
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