Just thinking about difficult child's education

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by klmno, Nov 25, 2011.

  1. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    I graduated high school early because I got all the required credits early by taking summer school one year. difficult child had been on a progressive path in school because he'd been going for the advanced diploma and there's a 98% chance that's off the table now since his time in Department of Juvenile Justice was extended about 7-10 days past the start of spring semester. However, it would be possible for him to get all the state's requirements for the standard diploma one semester early now, meaning he would have all requirements met by the end of fall semester his senior year, falling about thee same time he turns 18yo. I'm wondering if most school district's still allow graduating early if the requirements are met. This might serve as a real motivator for him and keep re-entry lady from dangling carrots that really do no more than encourage him to quit school and get his GED so he can get in the work force. He wants his diploma but as all teens, is itching to get independent and get some money in his pocket.

    I know he won't get off parole until he's at least 18 and if he goes to that group home, it won't be until after 18yo and in the work force, by any way I can see it, and that would mean them being involved until he's 18 1/2 (the summer of 2012) or until he quits school, gets a GED, and gets a job and apt, then they check on him for 3 mos after that. But if could could graduate in Jan, 2013, worse case scenario (other than reoffending and re-incarceration), he goes to group home in Feb., 2012, for 6-8 mos, then comes to live with me while finishing high school and they do their 'checking on him' for 90 days, but then I AM DONE with the people in the system because difficult child will be 18 and out of high school!! Then, if he stays with me or not, it's between him and me. If he stays on parole- I'm out of parole requirements once he's 18 and out of school.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2011
  2. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    I'd say that's some pretty good creative "out-of-the-box" thinking...
    It's certainly done here... (but that's Canada...)

    A diploma is worth more in the medium-term than a GED...
     
  3. DammitJanet

    DammitJanet Well-Known Member Staff Member

    I know here they allow graduating early. Now you cant walk early. I think that would be a good plan with maybe a chance for him to work for a 6 months or so then get ready to start in a community college in the fall to see if he could start fresh because CC is so different from HS. CC is also different from a University where there is the huge party atmosphere.
     
  4. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    That's exzactly what I'm thhinking DJ. My son needs to work the dirty work for a while in order to appreciate that college a little more and this would allow that, assuming he's not re-ooffending. And it's more feasible to go to CC part-time if that works best for him, so he can still work until he gets his head on a little straighter.

    I'm not going to bring this up with anyone except difficult child- I think it will motivate him and then he can advocate for himself with re-entry lady. I still will be on board for the IEP meeting at Department of Juvenile Justice in Jan so I will ask about it then- maybe we could get in his school district transition plan, then I don't think re-entry lady can over-ride it.
     
  5. JJJ

    JJJ Active Member

    You need to google your local school district (or the district he'll attend at the group home). Our district allows students to graduate 1 semester early if they have completed all of their credits.
     
  6. buddy

    buddy New Member

    That makes sense, I sure hope he will like the idea and that it is actually do-able. It SHOULD be. I just dont know about grad requirements etc. Haven't gotten that close, but you have done amazing research on what he needs so this next step is to see if it is possible. So good as usual..... you, I mean.
     
  7. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    I've looked thru the requirements several times and all I see are the requirements to graduate- but it doesn't say there is a requirement to be in high school a min of 4 school years, soooo.....and that was the arugument I used with my high school when I did it!

    PS Sorry about they typos- I have people here picking up the 'free' carpy washer & dryer so I can get new ones delivered.

    As an after thought- can 17 yo's quit school without parent's consent- including a non-custodial parent who still has parental rights?

    If difficult child wanted to stay his full senior year in order to get the advanced diploma, I would be supportive of that. I just don't want him re-offending or quitting HS in order to get out from underneath re-entry lady, me and/or PO quicker.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2011
  8. JJJ

    JJJ Active Member

    Wait....why is the advanced diploma off the table???
     
  9. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    They work on a schedule here where kids take longer class period each semester but get a full year's credit at the end of the semester, taking 4 classes per semester in HS. In order for it to be feasible, difficult child would have to have opportunity to take Span 2, Bio2 or Chemistry, WH2 or Government, and Algebra 2 this spring. They don't offer those classes (well, maybe the Government they do) in Department of Juvenile Justice schools or alternative schools, he would have to attend a mainstream HS in the spring and in his senior year and start the semester early enough for them to allow him in those classes. Now, it's not impossible to still get it because he could go to summer school or take an extreneous course load his senior year and still do it, but if he goes to group home, I don't see any way in hades it will happen- I think re-entry lady pretty much has it boiled down to 2 choices for these boys- alternative school for diploma or GED. If he came back to live with me, I would advocate for summer school and working part-time thru the summer, allowing him to take this higher level courses with mainstream school, etc, but I'm still flipping like a fish over the parole plan and all so I don't see difficult child being able to get anything but 2 core classes and 2 electives this upcoming spring semester.
     
  10. AnnieO

    AnnieO Shooting from the Hip

    They allow it here. Motivation is a good thing, and if he would do that... :bigsmile:
     
  11. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    difficult child just called and said he liked this idea a lot. He said they allow early graduation here- I guess he's heard of a few that have done it. I told him that I thought re-entry lady would push for him to get out on his own and I didn't want him to quit high school because he'd done so well. He said 'heck no- I'm not quitting- I've put way too much into this'. Well, that's a good sign, even for him to finally start thinking about long-term goals and the fact that''s he's worked for something instead of EVERYTHING being for the moment, Know what I mean?? He did asked if he'd still be able to go to the prom, ( that will be the least of our worries over the next 18 mos), and I said I wasn't sure. He said 'well, if my girlfriend still goes to that school then I would". Good point- yes, then you would, as long as you haven't gotten into trouble.
     
  12. buddy

    buddy New Member

    awww a bright spot. I think he really does know you are on his side.
     
  13. DammitJanet

    DammitJanet Well-Known Member Staff Member

    girlfriend? What girlfriend? LOL. Is he holding out on you, us, someone?
     
  14. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    LOL! Nope- he's referring to a future girlfriend...I'm pretty sure that's his first REAL goal upon release this time. And honestly, I'm ok with that as long as he uses protection and is reasonably civil and appropriate about it all. I had a step-bro (not the half bro who's an ****) who was in and out of trouble all his teen years, a royal difficult child, but once he found a good girlfriend, he changed and they are still happily married. (Not that I'd want my son getting married within the next couple of years, but it wouldn't hurt him to have someone in his life like a girlfriend to help motivate him.)
     
  15. DDD

    DDD Well-Known Member

    Positive goals are awesome. Have to say that in our community "dates" have to be approved if not full time students at the high school. Hopefully we are one of the few who insist on background checks for attendance. on the other hand there's time and conjecture involved in the idea...but it's positive thinking. Also, wouldn't you know it, our high school requires class attendance until the end of the senior year. If all high school courses are completed early it is possible to move on to community college classes. The vast number of online courses expedites graduation requirements for alot of students. Hugs DDD
     
  16. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    I found that in this town, Juniors cam also go to the prom, not just seniors. It was that way in the small town I grew up in, too. However, difficult child will most likely have to go to alternative school for this rest of this year and I doubt they get to go to any prom, I don't know but I find it unlikely that they have their own. If difficult child goes to group home, I don't think he'll ever be inside a mainstream school again. Now I've never heard of any HS that wouldn't let a Senior take a recent grad from the same HS to the prom as long as the kid was in trouble legally and was still in good standing with the school. But as I said before, this is really the least of my worries right now.

    We'll have to wait and see if the early graduation is allowed here. I can see having to wait until the end of the school year for schools that use year long class schedules, but I see no reason why they would on this type of block scheduling.

    difficult child told me today when he called that he'd rather stay where he is, incarcerated, than to be out and have to deal with a PO. Yeah, that's another thing- the Department of Juvenile Justice policy manual, which I found on line, states that if a kid opts to do the longer sentence instead of being released asap, they will get a 'direct release' instead of being on parole. But we both know they won't really allow him to do that.
     
  17. DammitJanet

    DammitJanet Well-Known Member Staff Member

    As far as prom, Jamie graduated from adult high school instead of from his home high school because they messed up a credit and he would have ended up needing to go to school for another semester the next year so we pulled him from HS at the end of the fall semester his HS year and put him into Adult HS at the community college and he finished up his credits before his actual class graduated...lol. He was the youngest student in the class there. It was hilarious...the age range was 17 to 77. Jamie went to prom with his girlfriend at her school because there was no prom at the adult HS.
     
  18. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    DJ, I'll just be happy if difficult child isn't incarcerated and is safe on prom night. I'll throw him a party at home (no drugs) if he can't go to the prom. LOL!
     
  19. DammitJanet

    DammitJanet Well-Known Member Staff Member

    K...if he graduates and manages to make it out from under parole without getting locked up again before he is 21, I will have Tony, Jamie, and Cory snatch him and take him for a night of adventure and fun that I wont tell you about...lmao!
     
  20. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    LOL! I have a feeling difficult child won't tell me what happened either!
     
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