Klonopin- any experiences with it?

Discussion in 'General Parenting Archives' started by EastCoastChris, Sep 14, 2002.

  1. EastCoastChris

    EastCoastChris New Member

    clonazepam

    Pronunciation: kloe NA ze pam
    Brand: Klonopin

    What is the most important information I should know about clonazepam?
    • Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Clonazepam will cause drowsiness and may cause dizziness. If you experience drowsiness or dizziness, avoid these activities.
    • Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking clonazepam. Alcohol may also increase your risk of having a seizure.
    • Do not stop taking clonazepam suddenly. This could cause seizures and withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with clonazepam.


    What is clonazepam?
    • Clonazepam is in a class of drugs called benzodiazepines. Clonazepam affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause seizures.
    • Clonazepam is used to treat seizures.
    • Clonazepam may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.


    What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clonazepam?
    • Do not take clonazepam if you have narrow-angle glaucoma. Clonazepam may worsen this condition.
    • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you
    · have kidney disease;
    · have liver disease;
    · have asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, or another respiratory disease; or
    · are depressed or have suicidal thoughts.
    • You may not be able to take clonazepam, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.
    • It is not known whether clonazepam will harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.
    • It is not known whether clonazepam passes into breast milk. Do not take clonazepam without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
    • If you are over sixty years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from clonazepam. You may require a lower dose of this medication.


    How should I take clonazepam?
    • Take clonazepam exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.
    • Take each dose with a full glass of water.
    • Do not take more than is prescribed for you.
    • Do not stop taking clonazepam suddenly if you have been taking it for several weeks. Stopping suddenly could cause seizures and withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with clonazepam.
    • Store clonazepam at room temperature away from moisture and heat.


    What happens if I miss a dose?
    • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. A double dose could be very dangerous.


    What happens if I overdose?
    • Seek emergency medical attention.
    • Symptoms of a clonazepam overdose include sleepiness, dizziness, confusion, a slow heart beat, difficulty breathing, difficulty walking and talking, an appearance of being drunk, and unconsciousness.


    What should I avoid while taking clonazepam?
    • Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Clonazepam will cause drowsiness and may cause dizziness. If you experience drowsiness or dizziness, avoid these activities.
    • Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking clonazepam. Alcohol may also increase your risk of having a seizure.
    • Avoid other sedatives, sleeping pills, and tranquilizers. They should not be used while you are taking clonazepam unless your doctor approves.


    What are the possible side effects of clonazepam?
    • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking clonazepam and seek emergency medical attention:
    · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, face, or tongue; or hives);
    · sores in your mouth or throat;
    · yellowing of the skin or eyes;
    · a rash;
    · hallucinations or severe confusion; or
    · changes in your vision.
    • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take clonazepam and talk to your doctor if you experience
    · drowsiness, dizziness, or clumsiness;
    · depression;
    · nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or constipation;
    · difficulty urinating;
    · vivid dreams;
    · headache;
    · dry mouth;
    · decreased sex drive; or
    · changes in behavior.
    • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.


    What other drugs will affect clonazepam?
    • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs:
    · an antihistamine such as brompheniramine (Dimetane, Bromfed, others), chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton, Teldrin, others), azatadine (Optimine), clemastine (Tavist), and many others;
    · a narcotic (pain killer) such as meperidine (Demerol), morphine (MS Contin, MSIR, others), propoxyphene (Darvon, Darvocet), hydrocodone (Lorcet, Vicodin), oxycodone (Percocet, Percodan), fentanyl (Duragesic), or codeine (Fiorinal, Fioricet, Tylenol #3, others);
    · another sedative such as phenobarbital (Solfoton, Luminal), pentobarbital (Nembutal), amobarbital (Amytal), or secobarbital (Seconal);
    · a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), or trifluoperazine (Stelazine); or
    · an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate).
    • Dangerous sedation, dizziness, or drowsiness may occur if clonazepam is taken with any of the medicines listed above.
    • Other seizure medications may not be as effective when you are taking clonazepam. Discuss your seizure medications with your doctor.
    • Blood pressure medications may be more effective and may result in very low blood pressure. Be alert for signs of low blood pressure (weakness, dizziness, fatigue) and talk to your doctor about your medication.
    • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with clonazepam. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.
     
  2. laura mz

    laura mz New Member

    jarrod was on this for about a year after trying buspar first. klonopin worked very well for him....did make him feel fuzzy for about 20 minutes after taking it, but he would be fine by the time he got to school.
     
  3. Guest

    I tried Klonopin (note spelling :confused: ) in Germany for restless leg syndrome (ya know it's bad when husband wakes you up and orders you to clip your toenails because you've just torn a gouge down the back of HIS leg).

    I lasted about a week on it before I got sick and tired of waking up feeling like I was drunk.

    It sure did put me to sleep in the evening though and it did quiet down the restless legs. Waking up and functioning in the morning was a bear, however.

    t'OtherKat
     
  4. ck1992

    ck1992 New Member

    I took half (.25 mg) of the lowest dose (.5 mg) twice a day for a few months last year. It worked very well for my anxiety and panic. When the doctor determined that depression was also rearing its ugly head, she put me on Serzone (it treats all 3) and I weaned myself off of Klonopin.

    I had no side effects at all with the Klonopin. It worked very well for my needs at that time.

    Suz
     
  5. momto2

    momto2 New Member

    This was the first medication thank you was on - prescribed by a pediatrician while we were still dealing with the "it's all the parent's fault" garbage. I don't remember what the dose was but basically it just knocked him out for a couple of hours, literally. Was not a therapeutic experience for us, though did give us a couple of hours of peace a day (gives you an idea of how completely awful things were with- him, that we would go to such an extreme). Anyway, after about two weeks he built up a tolerance to it and then it had no effect.

    Important to remember that at the time, we did *not* have a diagnosis, and were not receiving any meaningful help from the professionals - they were blaming us, his older brother, and having us do a positive reinforcement behavior management plan, like we'd never tried *that* before! Ugh!! Hindsight being 20/20, this was a completely inappropriate medication choice for him.
     
  6. Guest

    difficult child 1 took Klonopin for several months for anxiety. The theory was that his behavioral outbursts (rages) were anxiety induced, and that we might be able to eliminate them by maintaining a constant level of klonopin in his system.

    I do think it helped him cope with low level anxiety, but it did not prevent anxiety-caused rages in higher stress situations. He is now taking zyprexa, which seems better suited for him.
     
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