More research on our kid's frontal lobes

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by Steely, Nov 13, 2007.

  1. Steely

    Steely Active Member

    I know something similar was just posted, but I think the more information about what is actually happened in our kid's brains, the better. I think it helps to know, especially with our teenagers, that their frontal executive area is a good 3 years behind their peers. That said, how, or should, we change expectations?

    Here are some excerpts:
    <span style="color: #000099">"Developing more slowly in ADHD youngsters — the lag can be as much as three years — are brain regions that suppress inappropriate actions and thoughts, focus attention, remember things from moment to moment, work for reward and control movement. That was the finding of researchers, led by Dr. Philip Shaw of the National Institute of Mental Health, who reported the most detailed study yet on this problem in Monday's online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences."

    "In both groups the sensory processing and motor control areas at the back and top of the brain peaked in thickness earlier in childhood, while the frontal cortex areas responsible for higher-order executive control functions peaked later, during the teen years, they said."

    "Delayed in the ADHD children was development of the higher-order functions and areas which coordinate those with the motor areas."

    "The only part of the brain that matured faster in the ADHD children was the motor cortex, a finding that the researchers said might account for the restlessness and fidgety symptoms common among those with the disorder."

    "Slowest to mature in ADHD children were parts of the front and side of the brain that integrate information from the sensory areas with the higher-order functions. One area lagged five years in those with the disorder."</span>
  2. Steely

    Steely Active Member

    OOooooppps! I should have read all the other eagle eye mom's posts first! Sorry for being redundant!
  3. Fran

    Fran Former Site Owner

    I have always felt difficult child was years behind. As neurotypical males development slows down my difficult child seems to be catching up(although some of his disabilities will probably always be there)