ODD in the classroom / "Handout for Teachers and Administrators"

Discussion in 'Special Ed 101 Archives' started by Martie, Oct 5, 1999.

  1. Martie

    Martie Moderator

    I took parts of Jerri's very good (and funny) classroom/teacher modifications for ODD archive and edited for "off the board" consumption. I also removed "boardese" (gfg, etc) so that a school administrator could disseminate this to teachers.

    I gave Jerri full credit for all the ideas when I e-mailed this to an administrator who contacted me by e-mail but then I thought maybe someone else would like to see it in the archive.

    Martie

    (This was a nice idea, however,I can't copy out of my e-mail into here, suggestions?) Otherwise, I can e-mail it to you.
  2. Guest

    Classroom Management of Oppositional Defiant Disordered (ODD) Students


    The basics in ODD classroom management are:

    1.Escape for the child (in a confrontation, no one wins)

    2.Affecting attitudes of everyone

    Escape means to "get away" or "get out of"...
    and when your in a classroom full of children this may seem pretty tricky.

    What it means in terms of an ODD student is to "get away" from triggers
    that bring on the ODD behavior.

    And "get out of" old beliefs and habits that do, too.

    Ways to move towards ODD confrontations: (Things NOT to do!!)

    * responding quickly
    * trying to "convince"
    * threatening
    * raising the stakes
    * creating an audiance
    * keeping it going for long time
    * using sarcasm, anger etc.
    * using bribes
    * "cutting" the ODD child with words

    Ways to move away from ODD confrontations: (Things TO DO!)

    * giving simple, direct choices, that are real--not "do you want to follow
    directions or get kicked out?" An ODD child will always pick "kicked out"
    to have a confrontation.
    * following the pre-determined behavior plan
    * listening
    * giving brief and direct responses
    * private at all costs
    * walking away

    Now evaluate yourself and track your progress... do a mental report card
    for yourself.

    Did you buy into the struggle or did you just "window shop"?

    When you are done with your evaluation.. share it with someone else...
    another teacher perhaps or a supportive administrator who is struggling with
    these same issues.

    Orrrrrrrrr..... be really pro-active and give the parent a call and tell
    them of your successes and shortcomings in a situation and you may find that
    not only have they tried that same technique but that when they did it.. "it
    turned out like this".. This is called "sharing"... a unique concept that
    somehow teachers and parents have lost the ability to do as we all bog down
    in the legalize of special education law.

    Affecting attitude:

    This is where it gets real tricky.. most ODD students are pretty savy when
    it comes to obvious attempts at positive reinforcement.. and you must
    understand the they need to "save face" with their quality of ODD'ness and
    will reject positive strokes because they think they are being "played".

    So this will make them "on guard" even more.. if they think you are trying
    to "control" them by "strokes".

    Thus ... they get even more determined to "outsmart" you and sabotage your
    game before the first quarter starts.

    So without the fanfare that works very well for other students, you must
    give them the positive stuff also.

    But the trick is to "sneak" it past them without arousing their feelings of
    being overly controlled.

    1. Whisper it as you pass them ... "hey nice work there" or "love the
    dreadlocks"... be brief and sincere.. plan your stategy early and be
    determined to go with it at the first opportunity.

    2. Notes... These can do alot.. a simple note left somewhere for the ODD
    student to discover is not public and the fun for you is in finding inventive
    hiding spots for it. * imagine an ODD student finding a note from you inside
    his 9 page outline for his science project...*

    Most people have done secret pals.. and the fun was in leaving the surprise
    without being discovered. Same concept.

    Flash cards... This is a new variation on an old theme.

    Emotion flash cards.. kept in a pocket or on a clip board... being small
    and discreet are the keys to this.

    Make a "level of emotion flash cards... 1-5 works great well for many kids.
    Not too many but enough to have more than "mad, sad, and glad" which may be
    the only emotions ODD students can identify at first.

    Start with

    Thrilled... and use it very very sparingly.
    The ODD student should not see this except when something very positive has
    happened.

    Happy... this should express your contentment with the ODD student simply
    doing what is expected of everyone with some effort.

    Encouragement.. this should be common.. "You can do this, I know you can.."
    should be used often.

    Concern.. this should be flashed when the ODD student is beginning to show
    signs of an angry confrontation and to "open the door" for the student to
    talk to you if needed.

    Disapointment... use this when the ODD student makes an inappropriate
    comment during class discussion.. a "cue card" that you are unhappy with
    something the student is doing that doesn't call audience attention to the
    situation .

    Now the way to use them... these should be small... palm sized if
    neccesary... and should be very casually flashed to the student when
    appropriate.

    Color coding works very well... and if the ODD student is placed properly
    in your class ( near where you begin instruction ) and way from distractors,
    only the student will see it.

    * plan in advance to explain these flash cards to the ODD student.. this
    also will be a part of your written plan to avoid confrontations.

    This works very well for students who are ADD, ADHD, and have processing
    deficits or reading difficulty.

    Flash cards don't have to used. You can develop a secret system with the
    ODD student and parents in advance if you like.

    * small plastic figurines on your desk work
    * color mood charts... with slide to indicate color ( very discreet )
    * hand signals
    * audible signals like Morse code
    * anything thats just b/t you and the student

    2 Rules for success:

    1. When the ODD student is neutral or positive you should be positive and
    engaging, offering encouraging feedback and instruction.

    2. When the ODD student is negative, you should be neutral (emotionless)
    and business like.. and follow through on pre-determined plans and
    consequences.

    It takes a great deal of tolerance and emotional self-control to not "buy
    into" confrontations... but the cost of buying in can bankrupt any lesson
    plan or class.


    Recognize the Stages of Anger:
    * irritation
    * agitation
    * loss of control
    * resolution

    Do's and Don't' with ANGRY ODD students:

    DO:
    * use student's name
    * remove the audiance
    * use humor to de-escalate (but never sarcasm)
    * double your physical distance
    * attempt to distract
    * minimize discussion ( not a time to "process"... just allow cool down )

    DONT:
    * touch the ODD student
    * raise your voice
    * threaten consequences
    * point your finger
    * crowd the student
    * feed the rage fuel

    Watch your own body language!!!

    * are you giving personal space?
    * how is your posture.. firm and rigid or relaxed?
    * eye contact... are you avoiding or engaging and asking to help?

    Take inventory of your thoughts:

    * are you concentrating or annoyed?

    * are you reacting to your plans for the day and left over resenentment
    about previous failed plans?
    * concentrate on the ODD student's emotional state and how you are able to
    help at this crucial time.

    Speech:

    * calm voice

    * slow cadence repeating calmly directions and support.

    * communicate your confidence in the ODD student to regain control.

    Time out!!!

    (This is where so many rigid school rules really fail for ODD students)

    Time out MUST get creative.. and MUST involve being:

    * reasonable
    * respectful
    * fair

    Sending the ODD student to principal's office to "fully report" his failure
    does nothing short of lighting the fuse and adding more fuel.

    Sending the ODD student to the School Detention Center (or the land of
    lepers from child's point of view) only exascerbates the already low self
    esteem and regard that the ODD student has for him/her self.

    So by knowing this in advance, a plan MUST be developed with all involved
    to accomodate the ODD student's predictable losses of all behavioral control.

    They must be anticipated and plans made to fully address them.

    Teachers would not send a child with a bladder disorder to either of the
    above named places when his/her bladder failed.

    So why do we persist in doing so for a behavior disordered child who has
    virtually no self-control when totally agitated (in a "meltdown")?

    It doesn't work!

    Never has!

    Never will!

    This is where you must get creative..

    In one individual's behavior plan... * remember indidvidual is first word
    in IDEA... he walks off his meltdowns.

    He is 11, and he gets a walking pass, and is respected enough to bring
    himself under control, and return when he is "composed"... he has only done
    it twice, but his self-confidence doubled each time.

    Eventually he will bring himself under control in his seat without the
    walks. But for now, any control is better than a "total meltdown".

    His teacher "notices" the impending meltdown ( through her assesment of him
    that should begin every class period) and gives him an errand to run for her.
    ** hint hint ** wink wink ** She doesn't "out" him in front of class.

    He is handed his plan and reads it on his own in hall walking and follows
    it.


    I, _____________, :

    1. Will walk fast, not run, down halls a,b,c.
    2. Will not stop to look in classrooms or talk to students or staff in
    halls.
    3. Will walk until "icky" feeling is gone.
    4. Will think about breathing and remember to do breathing exercises.
    5. Will return to class with when calm, return pass to teacher and take
    seat as quietly as possible.
    6. Will talk to teacher as soon as possible about "icky" feeling and where
    it came from.

    This works for him!

    And modifications of this nature can work for any child.

    Allowing ODD students (particularly adolescents) to maintain dignity and
    self respect is the key.

    I hope this gives you a place to start with direct confrontation
    management.

    Classroom Management of Oppositional Defiant Disordered (ODD) Students


    The basics in ODD classroom management are:

    1.Escape for the child (in a confrontation, no one wins)

    2.Affecting attitudes of everyone

    Escape means to "get away" or "get out of"...
    and when your in a classroom full of children this may seem pretty tricky.

    What it means in terms of an ODD student is to "get away" from triggers that
    bring on the ODD behavior.

    And "get out of" old beliefs and habits that do, too.

    Ways to move towards ODD confrontations: (Things NOT to do!!)

    * responding quickly
    * trying to "convince"
    * threatening
    * raising the stakes
    * creating an audiance
    * keeping it going for long time
    * using sarcasm, anger etc.
    * using bribes
    * "cutting" the ODD child with words

    Ways to move away from ODD confrontations: (Things TO DO!)

    * giving simple, direct choices, that are real--not "do you want to follow
    directions or get kicked out?" An ODD child will always pick "kicked out"
    to have a confrontation.
    * following the pre-determined behavior plan
    * listening
    * giving brief and direct responses
    * private at all costs
    * walking away

    Now evaluate yourself and track your progress... do a mental report card for
    yourself.

    Did you buy into the struggle or did you just "window shop"?

    When you are done with your evaluation.. share it with someone else...
    another teacher perhaps or a supportive administrator who is struggling with
    these same issues.

    Orrrrrrrrr..... be really pro-active and give the parent a call and tell
    them of your successes and shortcomings in a situation and you may find that
    not only have they tried that same technique but that when they did it.. "it
    turned out like this".. This is called "sharing"... a unique concept that
    somehow teachers and parents have lost the ability to do as we all bog down
    in the legalize of special education law.

    Affecting attitude:

    This is where it gets real tricky.. most ODD students are pretty savy when
    it comes to obvious attempts at positive reinforcement.. and you must
    understand the they need to "save face" with their quality of ODD'ness and
    will reject positive strokes because they think they are being "played".

    So this will make them "on guard" even more.. if they think you are trying
    to "control" them by "strokes".

    Thus ... they get even more determined to "outsmart" you and sabotage your
    game before the first quarter starts.

    So without the fanfare that works very well for other students, you must
    give them the positive stuff also.

    But the trick is to "sneak" it past them without arousing their feelings of
    being overly controlled.

    1. Whisper it as you pass them ... "hey nice work there" or "love the
    dreadlocks"... be brief and sincere.. plan your stategy early and be
    determined to go with it at the first opportunity.

    2. Notes... These can do alot.. a simple note left somewhere for the ODD
    student to discover is not public and the fun for you is in finding inventive
    hiding spots for it. * imagine an ODD student finding a note from you inside
    his 9 page outline for his science project...*

    Most people have done secret pals.. and the fun was in leaving the surprise
    without being discovered. Same concept.

    Flash cards... This is a new variation on an old theme.

    Emotion flash cards.. kept in a pocket or on a clip board... being small and
    discreet are the keys to this.

    Make a "level of emotion flash cards... 1-5 works great well for many kids.
    Not too many but enough to have more than "mad, sad, and glad" which may be
    the only emotions ODD students can identify at first.

    Start with

    Thrilled... and use it very very sparingly.
    The ODD student should not see this except when something very positive has
    happened.

    Happy... this should express your contentment with the ODD student simply
    doing what is expected of everyone with some effort.

    Encouragement.. this should be common.. "You can do this, I know you can.."
    should be used often.

    Concern.. this should be flashed when the ODD student is beginning to show
    signs of an angry confrontation and to "open the door" for the student to
    talk to you if needed.

    Disapointment... use this when the ODD student makes an inappropriate
    comment during class discussion.. a "cue card" that you are unhappy with
    something the student is doing that doesn't call audience attention to the
    situation .

    Now the way to use them... these should be small... palm sized if
    neccesary... and should be very casually flashed to the student when
    appropriate.

    Color coding works very well... and if the ODD student is placed properly in
    your class ( near where you begin instruction ) and way from distractors,
    only the student will see it.

    * plan in advance to explain these flash cards to the ODD student.. this
    also will be a part of your written plan to avoid confrontations.

    This works very well for students who are ADD, ADHD, and have processing
    deficits or reading difficulty.

    Flash cards don't have to used. You can develop a secret system with the ODD
    student and parents in advance if you like.

    * small plastic figurines on your desk work
    * color mood charts... with slide to indicate color ( very discreet )
    * hand signals
    * audible signals like Morse code
    * anything thats just b/t you and the student

    2 Rules for success:

    1. When the ODD student is neutral or positive you should be positive and
    engaging, offering encouraging feedback and instruction.

    2. When the ODD student is negative, you should be neutral (emotionless)
    and business like.. and follow through on pre-determined plans and
    consequences.

    It takes a great deal of tolerance and emotional self-control to not "buy
    into" confrontations... but the cost of buying in can bankrupt any lesson
    plan or class.


    Recognize the Stages of Anger:
    * irritation
    * agitation
    * loss of control
    * resolution

    Do's and Don't' with ANGRY ODD students:

    DO:
    * use student's name
    * remove the audiance
    * use humor to de-escalate (but never sarcasm)
    * double your physical distance
    * attempt to distract
    * minimize discussion ( not a time to "process"... just allow cool down )

    DONT:
    * touch the ODD student
    * raise your voice
    * threaten consequences
    * point your finger
    * crowd the student
    * feed the rage fuel

    Watch your own body language!!!

    * are you giving personal space?
    * how is your posture.. firm and rigid or relaxed?
    * eye contact... are you avoiding or engaging and asking to help?

    Take inventory of your thoughts:

    * are you concentrating or annoyed?

    * are you reacting to your plans for the day and left over resenentment
    about previous failed plans?
    * concentrate on the ODD student's emotional state and how you are able to
    help at this crucial time.

    Speech:

    * calm voice

    * slow cadence repeating calmly directions and support.

    * communicate your confidence in the ODD student to regain control.

    Time out!!!

    (This is where so many rigid school rules really fail for ODD students)

    Time out MUST get creative.. and MUST involve being:

    * reasonable
    * respectful
    * fair

    Sending the ODD student to principal's office to "fully report" his failure
    does nothing short of lighting the fuse and adding more fuel.

    Sending the ODD student to the School Detention Center (or the land of
    lepers from child's point of view) only exascerbates the already low self
    esteem and regard that the ODD student has for him/her self.

    So by knowing this in advance, a plan MUST be developed with all involved to
    accomodate the ODD student's predictable losses of all behavioral control.

    They must be anticipated and plans made to fully address them.

    Teachers would not send a child with a bladder disorder to either of the
    above named places when his/her bladder failed.

    So why do we persist in doing so for a behavior disordered child who has
    virtually no self-control when totally agitated (in a "meltdown")?

    It doesn't work!

    Never has!

    Never will!

    This is where you must get creative..

    In one individual's behavior plan... * remember indidvidual is first word in
    IDEA... he walks off his meltdowns.

    He is 11, and he gets a walking pass, and is respected enough to bring
    himself under control, and return when he is "composed"... he has only done
    it twice, but his self-confidence doubled each time.

    Eventually he will bring himself under control in his seat without the
    walks. But for now, any control is better than a "total meltdown".

    His teacher "notices" the impending meltdown ( through her assesment of him
    that should begin every class period) and gives him an errand to run for her.
    ** hint hint ** wink wink ** She doesn't "out" him in front of class.

    He is handed his plan and reads it on his own in hall walking and follows it.


    I, _____________, :

    1. Will walk fast, not run, down halls a,b,c.
    2. Will not stop to look in classrooms or talk to students or staff in halls.
    3. Will walk until "icky" feeling is gone.
    4. Will think about breathing and remember to do breathing exercises.
    5. Will return to class with when calm, return pass to teacher and take seat
    as quietly as possible.
    6. Will talk to teacher as soon as possible about "icky" feeling and where
    it came from.

    This works for him!

    And modifications of this nature can work for any child.

    Allowing ODD students (particularly adolescents) to maintain dignity and
    self respect is the key.

    I hope this gives you a place to start with direct confrontation management.

    Susie,

    Jerri has a very long post that mixes suggestions for dealing with ODD kids
    in with suggestions for parents of ODD kids for dealing with teachers, some
    of which is not very diplomatic, from a teacher's viewpoint

    Therefore, I will attempt to excerpt Jerri's concrete suggestions (her big
    talent), leave out some of her editorial xcomments, and I still suggest that
    as a professional, you should read Greene's book if you haven't already seen
    it.


    The basics in ODD classroom management are:

    1.Escape for the child (in a confrontation, no one wins)

    2.Affecting attitudes of everyone

    Escape means to "get away" or "get out of"...
    and when your in a classroom full of children this may seem pretty tricky.

    What it means in terms of an ODD student is to "get away" from triggers that
    bring on the ODD behavior.

    And "get out of" old beliefs and habits that do, too.

    Ways to move towards ODD confrontations: (Things NOT to do!!)

    * responding quickly
    * trying to "convince"
    * threatening
    * raising the stakes
    * creating an audiance
    * keeping it going for long time
    * using sarcasm, anger etc.
    * using bribes
    * "cutting" the ODD child with words

    Ways to move away from ODD confrontations: (Things TO DO!)

    * giving simple, direct choices, that are real--not "do you want to follow
    directions or get kicked out?" An ODD child will always pick "kicked out"
    to have a confrontation.
    * following the pre-determined behavior plan
    * listening
    * giving brief and direct responses
    * private at all costs
    * walking away

    Now evaluate yourself and track your progress... do a mental report card for
    yourself.

    Did you buy into the struggle or did you just "window shop"?

    When you are done with your evaluation.. share it with someone else...
    another teacher perhaps or a supportive administrator who is struggling with
    these same issues.

    Orrrrrrrrr..... be really pro-active and give the parent a call and tell them
    of your successes and shortcomings in a situation and you may find that not
    only have they tried that same technique but that when they did it.. "it
    turned out like this".. This is called "sharing"... a unique concept that
    somehow teachers and parents have lost the ability to do as we all bog down
    in the legalize of special education law.

    Affecting attitude:

    This is where it gets real tricky.. most ODD students are pretty savy when it
    comes to obvious attempts at positive reinforcement.. and you must understand
    the they need to "save face" with their quality of ODD'ness and will reject
    positive strokes because they think they are being "played".

    So this will make them "on guard" even more.. if they think you are trying to
    "control" them by "strokes".

    Thus ... they get even more determined to "outsmart" you and sabotage your
    game before the first quarter starts.

    So without the fanfare that works very well for other students, you must give
    them the positive stuff also.

    But the trick is to "sneak" it past them without arousing their feelings of
    being overly controlled.

    1. Whisper it as you pass them ... "hey nice work there" or "love the
    dreadlocks"... be brief and sincere.. plan your stategy early and be
    determined to go with it at the first opportunity.

    2. Notes... These can do alot.. a simple note left somewhere for the ODD
    student to discover is not public and the fun for you is in finding inventive
    hiding spots for it. * imagine an ODD student finding a note from you inside
    his 9 page outline for his science project...*

    Most people have done secret pals.. and the fun was in leaving the surprise
    without being discovered. Same concept.

    Flash cards... This is a new variation on an old theme.

    Emotion flash cards.. kept in a pocket or on a clip board... being small and
    discreet are the keys to this.

    Make a "level of emotion flash cards... 1-5 works great well for many kids.
    Not too many but enough to have more than "mad, sad, and glad" which may be
    the only emotions ODD students can identify at first.

    Start with

    Thrilled... and use it very very sparingly.
    The ODD student should not see this except when something very positive has
    happened.

    Happy... this should express your contentment with the ODD student simply
    doing what is expected of everyone with some effort.

    Encouragement.. this should be common.. "You can do this, I know you can.."
    should be used often.

    Concern.. this should be flashed when the ODD student is beginning to show
    signs of an angry confrontation and to "open the door" for the student to
    talk to you if needed.

    Disapointment... use this when the ODD student makes an inappropriate comment
    during class discussion.. a "cue card" that you are unhappy with something
    the student is doing that doesn't call audience attention to the situation .

    Now the way to use them... these should be small... palm sized if
    neccesary... and should be very casually flashed to the student when
    appropriate.

    Color coding works very well... and if the ODD student is placed properly in
    your class ( near where you begin instruction ) and way from distractors,
    only the student will see it.

    * plan in advance to explain these flash cards to the ODD student.. this also
    will be a part of your written plan to avoid confrontations.

    This works very well for students who are ADD, ADHD, and have processing
    deficits or reading difficulty.

    Flash cards don't have to used. You can develop a secret system with the ODD
    student and parents in advance if you like.

    * small plastic figurines on your desk work
    * color mood charts... with slide to indicate color ( very discreet )
    * hand signals
    * audible signals like Morse code
    * anything thats just b/t you and the student

    2 Rules for success:

    1. When the ODD student is neutral or positive you should be positive and
    engaging, offering encouraging feedback and instruction.

    2. When the ODD student is negative, you should be neutral (emotionless) and
    business like.. and follow through on pre-determined plans and consequences.

    It takes a great deal of tolerance and emotional self-control to not "buy
    into" confrontations... but the cost of buying in can bankrupt any lesson
    plan or class.


    Recognize the Stages of Anger:
    * irritation
    * agitation
    * loss of control
    * resolution

    Do's and Don't' with ANGRY ODD students:

    DO:
    * use student's name
    * remove the audiance
    * use humor to de-escalate (but never sarcasm)
    * double your physical distance
    * attempt to distract
    * minimize discussion ( not a time to "process"... just allow cool down )

    DONT:
    * touch the ODD student
    * raise your voice
    * threaten consequences
    * point your finger
    * crowd the student
    * feed the rage fuel

    Watch your own body language!!!

    * are you giving personal space?
    * how is your posture.. firm and rigid or relaxed?
    * eye contact... are you avoiding or engaging and asking to help?

    Take inventory of your thoughts:

    * are you concentrating or annoyed?

    * are you reacting to your plans for the day and left over resenentment about
    previous failed plans?
    * concentrate on the ODD student's emotional state and how you are able to
    help at this crucial time.

    Speech:

    * calm voice

    * slow cadence repeating calmly directions and support.

    * communicate your confidence in the ODD student to regain control.

    Time out!!!

    (This is where so many rigid school rules really fail for ODD students)

    Time out MUST get creative.. and MUST involve being:

    * reasonable
    * respectful
    * fair

    Sending the ODD student to principal's office to "fully report" his failure
    does nothing short of lighting the fuse and adding more fuel.

    Sending the ODD student to the School Detention Center (or the land of lepers
    from child's point of view) only exascerbates the already low self esteem and
    regard that the ODD student has for him/her self.

    So by knowing this in advance, a plan MUST be developed with all involved to
    accomodate the ODD student's predictable losses of all behavioral control.

    They must be anticipated and plans made to fully address them.

    Teachers would not send a child with a bladder disorder to either of the
    above named places when his/her bladder failed.

    So why do we persist in doing so for a behavior disordered child who has
    virtually no self-control when totally agitated (in a "meltdown")?

    It doesn't work!

    Never has!

    Never will!

    This is where you must get creative..

    In one individual's behavior plan... * remember indidvidual is first word in
    IDEA... he walks off his meltdowns.

    He is 11, and he gets a walking pass, and is respected enough to bring
    himself under control, and return when he is "composed"... he has only done
    it twice, but his self-confidence doubled each time.

    Eventually he will bring himself under control in his seat without the walks.
    But for now, any control is better than a "total meltdown".

    His teacher "notices" the impending meltdown ( through her assesment of him
    that should begin every class period) and gives him an errand to run for her.
    ** hint hint ** wink wink ** She doesn't "out" him in front of class.

    He is handed his plan and reads it on his own in hall walking and follows it.


    I, _____________, :

    1. Will walk fast, not run, down halls a,b,c.
    2. Will not stop to look in classrooms or talk to students or staff in halls.
    3. Will walk until "icky" feeling is gone.
    4. Will think about breathing and remember to do breathing exercises.
    5. Will return to class with when calm, return pass to teacher and take seat
    as quietly as possible.
    6. Will talk to teacher as soon as possible about "icky" feeling and where it
    came from.

    This works for him!

    And modifications of this nature can work for any child.

    Allowing ODD students (particularly adolescents) to maintain dignity and self
    respect is the key.

    I hope this gives you a place to start with direct confrontation management.
    There are also lots of classroom modifications that you are probably more
    familiar with because they are used all the time with ADHD students. If you
    want some of those sugggestions, just ask.

    Martie

    [This message has been edited by momtoalex (edited 10-06-1999).]
  3. Martie

    Martie Moderator

    Thanks to Momtoalex for pasting my shorter version into this topic. Sorry you have a co-moderator whose a klutz with cut and paste. Maybe my learning curve will improve. LOL

    I'm archiving this so it will be around for those who need it "in a smaller bite" for teachers.

    ------------------
    Martie, mother of Mr. No (Major Dep -in remission, ODD, not ADHD or LD, musically very gifted) and a 14 yo pc daughter. DH of 22 yrs.