Ok, is this scenario plausible?

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by whatamess, Jan 19, 2011.

  1. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    1. difficult child has outburst at school (highly probably)----->2. school calls police(definitely possible and warned that it would happen again, however a BIP was put in place to the contrary)------>difficult child has autism and major people anxiety (so much so that he has a rotation of the same three people with him at all times at school) so the3. likelihood of him reacting in an aggressive or at the very least in an uncooperative way with police is highly probable------>4. police have him admitted to local inpatient pediatric psychiatric hospital.-------->major anxiety, PTSD issues, aggression likely to be seen over the 72 hour observation period------------------------------------------------>could.....5. these pyschiatrists at that facility recommend to a judge that my difficult child be placed in a residential treatment facility and I have nothing to say about it???? Can they do that?
     
  2. smallworld

    smallworld Moderator

    I don't know the answer, but I recommend calling your local NAMI office in the morning and asking. To find the contact info, go to www.nami.org (PM me if you need help finding the contact info for your state).
     
  3. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    Yes they can. And I wish to God that had happened with my son. Instead, school district had him arrested, extended family fought against MH treatment and tried to get custody, my son continued to get worse until he became aggressive with me at home, and is now on his second stint in Department of Juvenile Justice, meaning he has spent over 90% of the last 2 years incarcerated. He turned 16 yo today. I fought for him to go to Residential Treatment Center (RTC) but because of all the koi others stirred up, that option was eliminated. I'm not saying that is the right answer for your son, especially with his diagnosis, but your question was could they do it and my answer is yes. That doesn't mean you don't have a chance of prolonging the placement, maybe you do and if I was in your shoes with a difficult child who had that situation and diagnosis I would fight to prolong it. However, I think you should also be grateful that this option has been presented by people "in the system" because if the day ever comes where your son is faced with a possible long-term commitment to Department of Juvenile Justice, he will probably be allowed to go to Residential Treatment Center (RTC) instead. And you will be grateful for that recommendation that was instigated by the school district then.
     
  4. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    I just read SW's response- I should clarify- it depends on what state you're in and in the state I'm in, they most certainly can do it. They just wouldn't have. The police would have arrested him and takken him to juvy to await trial if the school district calls them. If the parent calls, then they are musch more likely to take them in to a psychiatric hospital for observation. But in this state, parents typically feel that the scenario you described is the one we wish the school district and police would take, even though they can- they don't.

    But difficult child's elementary school district also wanted to have him arrested at 8yo for bringing an orange or green plastic squirt gun to school (that he'd gotten as a reward at cub scouts the night before) on the charge of bringing a look-a-like weapon to school. Never mind it was flourescent but clear plastic with a huge white "trigger" that no child over the age of 2yo would have thought was a gun and difficult child never pulled it out, much less pointed it at anyone.
     
  5. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    So, what's going on that made you think of this scenario? How far has it gotten?
    The only other question I have in regard to the scenario being plausible is whether you would be forced to pay for the treatment or whether it would be state-run. I have no clue.
     
  6. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    Basically school district's lawyer hired a neuropsychologist to evaluate and his last recommendation on his report was that if behaviors continued that he should be admitted to a Residential Treatment Center (RTC). School principal is ready to have difficult child out.
     
  7. smallworld

    smallworld Moderator

    Can you get an educational advocate?
     
  8. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    Got an advocate and she works with a lawyer through our state's advocacy agency. They have told me the scenario above is not 'preventable' and that scares me beyond belief, mostly because I know my difficult child's anxiety issues and maturity level (probably emotionally 5 years old) would have him eaten alive at an Residential Treatment Center (RTC) (he's 13 and brings stuffed animals to school to cuddle with)
     
  9. smallworld

    smallworld Moderator

    It depends on the Residential Treatment Center (RTC). My son just finished 16 months at an Residential Treatment Center (RTC), and it was the most amazing program imaginable. Some RTCs specifically treat kids on the spectrum, and that's what you would need to push for.
     
  10. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    If it goes through the court system and is ordered (the Residential Treatment Center (RTC)) do I have a say in which Residential Treatment Center (RTC)?
     
  11. smallworld

    smallworld Moderator

    You should retain an attorney. I have a friend whose son was court-ordered to an Residential Treatment Center (RTC), and while she didn't get to hand-pick which Residential Treatment Center (RTC), her attorney was able to help the process along behind the scenes.
     
  12. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    Since the school district instigated this you would have every right to get an independent MH & educational evaluation and educational consultant. I would suggest both. The school district should be paying for the majority of the cost and the jurisdiction you live in should have a "team" that will pick up part of it. You still might have to pay some of it. If your child is taking stuffed animals to school at 13yo, you really might be better off to go this route and you will probably be taken a whole lot more serious as a parent if you go into court with written evaluations and recommendations from professionals than you would if you went in saying that you think he should stay at home and keep on going this way (ie- you protecting him).
     
  13. susiestar

    susiestar Roll With It

    It sound slike it is time to look at other schools/placements. in my opinion this could be a safety risk to your son. AIf you can find a program that would be good for him and work with his problems, then get the school to help with the cost because they cannot handle him (having the police as their plan to handle him sure seems like the school cannot handle him, in my opinion), you could end up with a truly wonderful experience. Start looking now and talk to an attorney. Also contact NAMI and various autism advocacy groups because yoru child isn't the only one they will do this to (or try it on). They may be able Occupational Therapist (OT) hlep you fight it and to help find other placements to help prevent this.

    I am very sorry.
     
  14. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    Another thing you can do is look for private schools in your area that specialize in helping autistic children. You can fight in court that the school district has to foot the bill for the private school. I'm talking about a regular day school with him living at home. This has been a common fight in court over the past 10 or so years in the state I live in when a child is diagnosis'd with autism. If your school district obviously can't help him, this is a very valid and plausible argument because private day (regular) school that specializes in autism would be the LRE and the most reasonable next step. But yes, most definitely get a good, reputable, Special Education attny on board.
     
  15. JJJ

    JJJ Active Member

    I would look for a private day school in your area that specializes in children with autism.

    I would also take him to the police station near the school and have him meet the police officers. If you set it up in advance, the community liason officer might be able to talk with him and explain that sometimes police are called to help when situations are out of control and that if he is ever somewhere when the police arrive, here are the things to do that will help them (have the officer actually demonstrate the behavior that they would want to see from difficult child). If difficult child sees the arrival of the police as help instead of a punishment it may help him stay calm.

    RTCs are very expensive. Kanga had 5 doctors recommend that she be placed in an Residential Treatment Center (RTC), but without funding it didn't happen -- even though we begged someone to find anyone with funding and authority to order it. Only a court can order you to place your child in an Residential Treatment Center (RTC). The school does not have that authority. They may be able to prove to a due process officer that they cannot keep your son safe in a less restrictive environment but you can always decline placement at that point and home school him. If they do say that Residential Treatment Center (RTC) is the only option, then they pay the full bill (they may tap into other funding sources to help, but none of it should come to you besides whatever medical services he gets (medications, etc) and after 90 days in Residential Treatment Center (RTC), he should qualify for SSI and the Medicaid card but he does need to apply).

    If you think an Residential Treatment Center (RTC) can help, remember that you do not have to send him away for the year never to see him. Kanga's roommate is managable at home but not so much at school. Her parents pick her up every Friday after work and return her to the Residential Treatment Center (RTC) after dinner on Sunday. She is home for all school holidays, etc. Before she started working (she's 17 now), I believe they also took her out to dinner on Wednesdays. It allows her to get the intensive services she needs and still be part of her family's life at least 3-4 days/week.
     
  16. DaisyFace

    DaisyFace Love me...Love me not

    What JJJ said...

    Anyone can "wish" for Residential Treatment Center (RTC) - but it takes funding and authority to get a child there...

    It would REALLY surprise me to learn that the school district was pushing for this AND willing to pay the bill.
     
  17. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    If it goes through the court, does the school still have to pay? Like the scenario mentioned above....unruly difficult child--->police call---->police take him to inpatient psychiatric evaluation.---->judge determines through psychiatric recommendations to send him to Residential Treatment Center (RTC)---->would the school pay at that point or the state?
     
  18. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    Probably- if the school district is saying they can't educate him there so therefore, a Residential Treatment Center (RTC) is the LRE they can educate him in, then the school district has to pay the educational component. They can usually get county money to pay for some of the other costs but you might have to pick up some.
     
  19. JJJ

    JJJ Active Member

    Wait....a psychiatric hospital isn't likely to take you to court. The police might transport to ER, and they might admit him to the psychiatric hospital over your wishes, but the psychiatric hospital's goal is to stabilize and discharge. Most people involved in the system do not want kids in RTCs.
     
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