Ok, seriously....(behavior mod)

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by whatamess, Mar 16, 2012.

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  1. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    Ok, my school district says they can't educate my difficult child (and I don't think they can based on the multitude of placements-sometimes more than one per year he has been through). He is acting out in every school setting and basically says he doesn't ever want to go to school again. My school district has placed him in a private program. I have heard not so good things about the punitive nature of the program. I have insisted I stay in the building while he is there. He ended up secluded the first day for the two hours he attended. They wanted to restrain him multiple times even though I was able to de-escalate him both times. The second time 5 people were ready to put him in restraints and I went in to talk to him and he asked me for a hug! I cannot wrap my mind around people so eager to seclude and restrain a child. I am now becoming convinced the program purposely triggers the children in order to have them react and then they are shown who is in control. I am so not cool with this. Have any of your children been in such a program and had success? The staff are adamant that controlling the child is what the child wants and needs. I feel like there has to be a more humane and respectful way to gain compliance.
     
  2. buddy

    buddy New Member

    That is too scary. I'd want to see the research on that. The mandate is to use positive skill building evidence based practices. I think these methods rob people of their dignity and say might makes right. If you are staying there your gut says it is wrong. I am on my phone so forget if this is in the USA? After the tour I just took their goal is to only use restraint as a last resort for intense aggression. I wish you could come see. It is full of kids like ours. I'm sooooo sorry.
     
  3. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    They told me they would seclude him for things like ripping paper and tipping a chair over.
     
  4. buddy

    buddy New Member

    oh gosh I have just never heard of anything like that! What do you think about this???
     
  5. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    It is in direct opposition of my philosophy of what children need. It is the most frustrating experience to try to explain to the director my viewpoint- we are speaking foreign languages to one another-just cannot comprehend the other person's point of view being valid.
     
  6. buddy

    buddy New Member

    Is this the USA? I dont know about other countries but....this is the legislation that was being pushed recently and I haven't heard the outcome....anyone know??? I am being lazy, not looking it up. This IS how it is in my state. (clearly as in my case people ignore this)

    This legislation is proposed because so many kids have been injured and died.

    Current mandate says:
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Note: [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Wrightslaw: Special Education Law, 2nd Edition includes IDEA 2004 and the special education regulations. You can download the special education regulations and commentary and other resources from IDEA 2004 at Wrightslaw.

    If a child’s behavior impedes the child’s learning or that of others, must IEP Teams base positive behavioral interventions and support on a functional behavioral assessment?
    [/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Yes. Conducting functional behavioral assessments typically precedes developing positive behavioral intervention strategies.[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Does “consideration of special factors” address the behavioral needs of children with disabilities in the IEP process?[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Yes. The IEP Team determines whether a child needs positive behavioral interventions and supports. If the behavior of a child impedes the child’s learning or the learning of other children, the IEP Team must consider the use of positive behavioral supports, supports, and other strategies to address that behavior. (20 U.S.C. § 1414(d)(3)(B)(i), 34 C.F.R. § 300.324(a)(2)(i))

    If the child's behavior impedes the child's learning or that of others, must the IEP Team develop a plan to address these problem behaviors?

    Yes. If the child's behavior impedes his learning or the learning of others, the IEP team must include strategies, including positive behavioral interventions, supports, and other strategies to address that behavior. If the child's behavior that impedes learning is not addressed in the IEP, the IEP Team must review and revise the IEP to ensure that the child receives appropriate positive behavioral interventions and supports and other strategies. (34 C.F.R. § 300.324(a)(2)(i) and 34 C.F.R. § 300.324(a)(3)(i).
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Must school districts train teachers regarding the use of positive behavioral interventions and support?[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Yes. School districts must provide teachers with high-quality professional development, including the use of scientifically based instructional practices. School districts must ensure that personnel have the skills and knowledge necessary to improve the academic achievement and functional performance of children with disabilities. Each district must ensure that all personnel necessary are appropriately and adequately prepared. (20 U.S.C. § 1412(a)(14), 34 C.F.R. § 300.156)

    Each State must establish and maintain qualifications to ensure that personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, and have the content knowledge and skills to serve children with disabilities. (20 U.S.C. § 1412(a)(14), 34 C.F.R. § 300.156(a))
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Must school districts use research-based positive behavioral supports and systematic and individual research-based interventions when addressing the behavioral needs of children with disabilities in their IEPs?[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Yes. School districts must ensure that scientifically based research drives their professional development activities and services. (34 C.F.R. § 300.226(b)(1))

    The implementation of early intervening services specifically focuses on professional development for teachers and other school staff to enable such personnel to deliver scientifically based academic and behavioral interventions, and providing educational and behavioral evaluations, services, and supports. (20 U.S.C. § 1413(f)(2), 34 C.F.R. § 300.226(b)(1))
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The definition of "scientifically based research" is included in the regulations (34 C.F.R. § 300.35). Scientifically based research is referenced in IDEA 2004 (20 U.S.C. § 1411(e)(2)(C)(xi)). The full definition of the term “scientifically based research” includes that a peer-reviewed journal published the research, or that a panel of independent experts through a comparably rigorous, objective, and scientific review approved it.

    Must public agencies provide positive behavioral interventions and supports for all children identified as having an emotional disturbance?
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]No. IEP Teams make decisions on an individual basis for each child. IEP Teams need not consider such interventions, supports, and strategies for a particular group of children, or for all children with a particular disability. IEP Teams must consider the use of positive behavioral interventions and supports, and other strategies to address the behavior of a child whose behavior impedes the child’s learning or that of others. (20 U.S.C. 1414(d)(3)(B)(i)), 34 C.F.R. § 300.324(a)(2)(i))[/FONT]
     
  7. buddy

    buddy New Member

    I am having a brain fart.... I think I remember you had written to the school board right? So how did this placement happen. Was it a unilateral placement? Did you agree?

    It seems like they are walking all over best practices. It sounds just awful. For me, I would pull him and demand a better placement. I talked to a parent of the school I want Q to go to. She said that her son got sent home four days per week from school until he went to this school. Now this school actually has people certified in a kind of prone restraint that is very very restricted in our state, strict reporting rules, far stricter than typical restraint. YET their rate of restraint is FAR LESS than other districts because their whole goal is to build skills and avoid seclusion and restraint whenever possible. This lady said that her son finally was feeling like he was a good kid. I am hoping for that too. I want that for your son. I am just really so upset for you. Sorry, dont mean to push my trauma on you. But I think I hear you saying that you are not comfortable either. If you can calm him and he needed you to hug him...this boy needs gentle teaching methods, individualized programming. It seems so wrong. I am crying about this, sorry.
     
  8. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    I feel for you. I think there is an ongoing trend in our country right now to blame the parents for 'out-of-control' kids, however, the people in the system or hired by the system have less clue than the parents about how to control them or help the family or school district.
     
  9. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    The director told me multiple times that she thought my anxiety was making my child anxious-blame-blame-blame. Buddy we are in the US and not too far from you statewise. The seclusion and restraint laws mandated for schools do not apply because it is priviate- however the school district is paying for it and so I've been told, are responsible making sure my child is receiving a free, appropriate education (they are trying to wash their hands of it though).
     
  10. buddy

    buddy New Member

    I thought so, sorry... I remembered we talked and you said you had written that letter and have been through so much with them. If you dont like it, then get him the heck out. They have to find a better choice for him. Do they do anything you like, is there any hope this will change???


    OH and even if the seclusion/restraint issue was not on board.... ummm.... that director is NUTS. Yeah you probably do seem anxious...though he is there because there are many placements where he has behaviors and I doubt you were around for all those times. ANYONE would seem anxious to see their kid go through all of that! I'd worry if you were not upset.
     
  11. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Advocate time.
    They will not take a parent seriously.
    You need "professionals" on multiple fronts behind you.
    Like Buddy has... she's got an advocate, plus non-school resources like therapist, psychiatrist...
    And even THEN it's a head-to-head fight.
    But... Buddy is winning.

    We're in Canada. No option on advocates. But even here... parents have no weight. We had to fight through whatever layers, to get a psychiatrist and therapist on our side... and THEN, school listens.

    Someone ELSE has to tell the school district that this placement is not appropriate for this child.
     
  12. klmno

    klmno Active Member

    I've heard that, too. But I think it's an excuse. An idiot could figure out which is the cause and which is the effect, in my humble opinion.
     
  13. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    This is the child with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)???? And they are blaming him for his behavior?

    I think it is child abuse. Can you educate him some other way while obtaining services, such as homeschooling? I would NOT want to put THOSE people in charge of my Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) child. He needs interventions, not torture. The things he has done, like ripping paper, is a very autistic thing to do and should not be disciplined! At least, not like that. Do they even understand what his diagnosis is and what it means? They sound terrible.
     
  14. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    I wonder if your area is a bit like ours... Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Aspie kids get X, Y and Z for services. Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) kids get... nothing. (school doesn't consider Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) a "real" diagnosis)
     
  15. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    Oh goodness I have an advocate, but the school district has a rabid attorney- it is not a good situation at all.
     
  16. buddy

    buddy New Member

    IC they ignore Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) or Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified??? In the US though, the schools can only use Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). So if that is his educational category that is all there is. People can talk off the record about Aspergers, "low functioning" etc.... but on the IEP it all looks the same as far as educational category.

    I just think in general kids with serious behavior disorders related to their disabilities really are treated like they are doing it on purpose and that the parents are just not giving enough consequences. If they want to give him holds because he wants the touch etc...well that can be done in a gentle sensory diet....every one or two hours using soft balls to press on or weighted blankets or a huggie vest or something like that.

    I bet you can get things moving with a lawyer but that takes a fortune unless you get the disability law people and if he is being treated like this they may WANT to get involved.
     
  17. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Pretty much. Like, to the point that some psychiatrists will tell the parent that the child is really Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) or Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified, but will provide a formal diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)... just so they can get services in the school and medical communities...

    If your needs match some neat little check-off box - or multiples of these - they will do a fair bit. Downs? Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)? quadraplegic, CP, etc. no problem. ADHD doesn't get resources, but does get informal accommodations (usually). Auditory Processing Disorders (APD) gets dealt with. But... Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD)? ignore. Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)? ignore.

    Actually - whatamess... maybe you need to get that Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) diagnosis re-evaluated... and see if it isn't "really" Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)? Not that it necessarily is, but if the psychiatrist understands the predicament, maybe he IS close enough to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) to be "nudged" over the line and get that diagnosis? Because... Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is most definitely a disability, even to a layman...
     
  18. whatamess

    whatamess New Member

    He has diagnosis of adhd, anxiety, PTSD, and autism (Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified was his first diagnosis).
     
  19. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    And your district doesn't have specialized Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)/autism services?

    Do you have an autism support network in your state? (we have them here... usually a not-for-profit rather than government) They may have resources to help you fight this, too.
     
  20. buddy

    buddy New Member

    What is his educational category?...ask TeDo, often kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) get put into EBD (emotional behavioral disorder category) and while is great for kids who really do need that kind of support it can be a disaster for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) kids. And forcing them to change it can be difficult.

    I know you have been through so much. Probably have done this a million times. But I will ask anyway, has he had a recent private neuropsychologist or specifically an autism evaluation with a clinic that specializes in that? Maybe that could give you amo. to get different kinds of services???
     
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