Parent Report- Updated

Discussion in 'FAQ, Site Help, and Resources' started by Fran, Feb 24, 2004.

  1. Fran

    Fran Former Site Owner

    Parent Report and Assessment
    by Jerri/updated by Wildflower


    Parent Report and Assessment for [Name of Child, Date of Birth]

    Prepared by:
    [Name of Parents/Caregivers]

    [Photo of Child]

    Table of Contents:
    1. Introduction to [Name of Child]
    2. Family History
    3. Medical History
    4. Mental/Emotional History
    5. Social History
    6. Scholastic History
    7. Assessment History
    8. Interventions:€“ Past and Present
    9. Concerns: Present and Future
    10. Aspirations

    Notes:

    Do not try to write this all in one sitting. Start with one area of the document and work your way through, one item at a time.

    Gather all of the assessments, reports, report cards, journals, baby books and any other support documents into one folder/box so that you have easy access to the information while writing this report.

    Be mindful that the information will be part of the file/permanent record either at the doctor's office and or the school. Present the information clearly and as objectively as possible.

    The inclusion of your child's photograph lends a "face to the name" and personalizes the report even further.

    Introduction to [Name of Child]

    Describe what your child looks like, who he/she is, what his/her likes and dislikes are. This is meant to be a positive overview of your child.
    List what your child's strengths are in the home, the school, the community, and within him/herself.


    Family History
    Family: Start with whom your child lives with (parents, grandparents, siblings, etc.). When introducing the immediate family, indicate what their jobs are, what their interests are, any awards won, challenges they face, and what their relationship is like with your child, etc. You are trying to provide a picture of the influences in your child'€™s life. Information about length of marriage, divorce, deaths in the family are important to address.
    Pets: List the number and type of pets you have and your child'€™s relationship to them, how your child treats them.
    Values: Indicate what your family values are in relation to church, community involvement, volunteer work etc.
    Concerns: If you have concerns about your home, bring them up only slightly here.


    Medical History
    Start with the pregnancy of your child. What complications, if any, were noted?
    Describe the delivery, birth weight, and any issues of concern surrounding the birth process.
    List any developmental delays.
    List immunizations and any reactions noted related to them.
    List any infections (example: ear), illnesses (chicken pox), injuries, broken bones, stitches, etc.
    List any medications prescribed over the course of your child’s life.
    List any previous hospitalizations (physical/mental) your child has had.


    Mental/Emotional History

    List Family Medical History€“ in particular, any known disorders such as Bi-polar, Depression, Aspergers Syndrome, Nonverbal Learning Disorder, Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit with Hyperactivity Disorder, Dyslexia, etc.
    If any assessments have been documented, note briefly what the outcome of the assessment(s) has been. There is a section devoted to Assessment History that will provide this in detail.


    Social History
    Describe how your child developed socially: were they eager to play with other children, how did they respond, did they have playmates, were they invited to parties, etc.
    Describe any relevant social family information here as well. This would include moves to other locations, divorce, major family upsets, etc. This is the place to frame your family'€™s social history in the light you want it viewed.
    Describe any relevant information regarding interventions with police or other law enforcement.


    Scholastic History
    List the grade level of your child and schools attended.
    Note any awards or academic achievements your child has received.
    Note any difficulties your child has experienced in school (bullying, exclusion, grade failures, etc.).
    If any tutors have been provided, list the subject area and duration.
    If you have an Individual Education Plan (IEP), include it here.


    Assessment History
    Provide any assessments that have been documented.

    Interventions: Past and Present
    Note behavior modification plans, if they worked or not.
    List all medical, dietary, natural remedies that have been utilized and note which worked and which didn’t.
    If therapy has been tried, list the outcome and whether or not it was of any benefit.
    If you are using – or have used - a methodology (such as the Riley Method, Explosive Child/Basket Method, 1-2-3 Magic, etc.) make note of it.
    Mention the resources you have found and tried, or wish you could try. Things such as biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, summer camps, etc.


    Concerns: Present and Future
    What is troubling you about your child’s behavior at present (education, social life, spiritual life, home life, etc.)?
    What are your concerns about it?
    What are your worries for the future? Why?
    List what your child's weaknesses are in the home, the school, the community and within him/herself.


    Aspirations
    Allow yourself to sit back and dream of the life you want with and for your child. Be as specific as possible (enjoy mealtimes, outings, etc.).
    How you would like your difficult child to experience life.
     
  2. runawaybunny

    runawaybunny Administrator Staff Member

    Jerri's original:

    *****PARENT REPORT******
    WHAT IS IT?
    Well under the reauthorization of IDEA 97 we are now full MET team members which essentially means squat if we dont take advantage of it.

    Ok everyone here has read "their" reports, and you may or may not understand them, and IF you don't you must request to have them explained to you. ask in writing, better yet put your questions in writing too.

    A Parent report is something you write, and you share with the school, and it becomes a permanent part of your child's educational record.

    What is the worst thing about this in terms of next grade, new teacher, new school, new Doctor, new counselor, babysitter, probation officer,Judge etc... etc...????????????


    ITS TELLING " THE STORY " AGAIN...........
    ( DO IT ONCE DO IT WRITE ) THEN UPDATE, UPDATE, UPDATE!

    Ok, here's the outline, and you make however you want, but you need to understand that the better you " build " this the easier it is to get your point across, and ANYONE who will ever be involved in Advocacy for your child will find this a crucial piece.

    IE: If you identified a need for your difficult child to learn to tie his shoes, and it was ignored by the MET team, and he trips and falls, then you have a sound position for Liability. (very simplistic example and I AM NOT saying you should be looking around every corner for a lawsuit... it just shows that you properly shared your concern )

    WHAT IT DOES IS PROVIDE FOCUS... A ROAD MAP, AND A GUIDE TO YOUR CHILD, ALBEIT THE TWILIGHT ZONE!!!

    Cover:

    Parent Report and assessment for difficult child dated________

    Prepared with love by:

    Mr. & Mrs. difficult child

    * scan a picture for cover if you like... keep the focus on the difficult child!!!!

    1. Intro to difficult child
    * describe what your child looks like who he is, what he likes favorite cereal, toys & activities. general positive overview of your child. By all means use humor here...

    ex: favorite hobby... driving parents nuts etc.

    * try to make it humorous as it will entice reader to read on.


    2. INTRO TO PARENTS AND HOME

    * who he lives with, and what your like, your jobs, interests etc. Siblings, pets, extended family supports ( gma ) Walk them thru your home, when I did mine, i introduced each fam member, then at the end described difficult child'S relationship with that person.

    If you have concerns about your home, bring them up only slightly here. Your values... this is good place to include your values, church, community involvement volunteer work etc.

    difficult child'S room, describe that, and who sleeps in there, and if he is alone cause he has to be, briefly explain why he has to be alone.

    In describing siblings, I told about their awards, grades, challenges, etc.
    Pets... this is good time to bring up concerns about the way difficult child has treated pets.

    3. MEDICAL HISTORY

    * PREGNANCY/ADOPTION/BIRTH/TODDLER/any and all concerns. CHICKEN POX, infections stitches, broken bones, a chronological, go straight to medications - who prescribed / how much.

    4. SOCIAL HISTORY

    * Ok you may get squeemish here, I really don't like talking about my divorce, whom i lived with etc. But they will ask, and this is your chance to present it in the light in which you viewed it, without their judgmental interpretations.

    Many times they twist what you tell them in their reports to insinuate that the problems are in the home. So be honest, and tell them how you resolved any negative experiences.

    Talk about how your child developed socially, was he eager to play with other toddlers, how does he do with neighbor kids, at church, at school etc. ( Matt cant name any classmates.. and has never been invited to a friends home) sigh.........

    5. WHATS WORKED / WHATS FAILED

    * When my difficult child does this we have done this... this worked / this didn't. This is what works now! In second grade his teacher was like this, and he responded well to this. In third grade the teacher did this and it was a disaster. We used a point system for chores, and it failed because. We tried Dr. Greens method in dealing with________ and it worked great the first 3 times.
    If you are absolutely baffled by a particular behavior, be sure you discuss it and explain that you have no idea how to address it.

    6. MAJOR CONCERNS

    Today / tomorrow / next week /year 5& 10 years from now.

    ( I started this section with " Well serial killer comes to mind..." ) LOL

    * I am concerned that my difficult child will not receive an appropriate education this year because....

    I am concerned that he will be in jail because...

    By not providing him an appropriate education he will be affected next year...
    in 5 years.......
    in 10 years......
    in Life.......

    7. STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESS'S

    * In the home........
    At school...............
    In church.............
    In the community.........
    difficult child with himself.............

    I listed 3 examples in each except home & school, this is where I really went into detail about the two. And as you may guess the weakness's were longer in the home/school setting than strengths, I was not concerned however cause it is an accurate view.

    8. RESOURCES FOUND/TRIED/FAILED
    * These are the things you have found, tried or wish to try and why, and want the district to consider in providing FAPE. Medical services, residential, summer wilderness camps, one on one aide.

    Vocational programs, physical therapy etc.
    Alternatives to restraints, Bio feedback, music therapy, art therapy.
    If your difficult child does not have friends, ask for a summer camp ( Over night ) to expose him to positive peer relationships.

    If he gets kicked off the bus all the time, ask for a 1 on 1 aide.

    NOTE: if your easy child is suffering as a result of all that's happening, ask for parent training and counseling, ask that you and your entire family be trained in preventing / deflecting assaults. Also sensitivity/disability awareness training for family/friends/neighbors/ dog!!!( kidding about the dog, but they should get respite too.)

    IDEA 97 OPENS MANY DOORS, YOU JUST HAVE TO KNOW HOW TO ASK...!

    9. BEST WAYS TO COMMUNICATE

    * this is where you tell the school how you wish to be contacted, how you can best work together, such as convenient times and locations for meetings, phone calls etc.

    *** IF YOU ARE GETTING IN TROUBLE FOR CALLS AT WORK, FORBID THEM TO CALL YOU THERE, AND CREATE AN ALTERNATE PLAN!!!*******

    Some districts provide extra books for home, and FAX machines, to parents so that reports and homework can be sent quickly. Fax machines are an excellent way to communicate.

    10. DREAMS AND GOALS

    * Allow yourself to sit back and dream of the life you want with and for your difficult child, soccer, ballet, singer, spelling bee champ, college, marriage, career, cheerleader, 1st date, Prom, astronaut and parent.

    How you would like your difficult child to experience life.

    DON'T:

    DO NOT SIT DOWN AND DO THIS IN ONE SITTING!!!

    START IT... DO THE OUTLINE... SAVE IT.

    COME BACK AND DO IT SOME MORE.

    THE MEDICAL PART IS THE MOST TECHNICAL.

    As things change update the report, and show the updates.

    Send your report to the school and ask for a new IEP or MET, ask that they read it in advance, if that's whats in order.

    Next send a copy to the other providers, such as Dr., counselor, PO, whoever.

    Be very proud of yourself for having done such a neat thing for your child.

    Well... hope you all will find this as helpful a tool as I have. Really validates your difficult child and your family.

    Hugs N Love!!!

    Jerri
     
Loading...