Quick question Sheila/Martie-another ?

Discussion in 'Special Ed 101' started by LittleDudesMom, Oct 5, 2007.

  1. LittleDudesMom

    LittleDudesMom Well-Known Member Staff Member

    I know that there are some new provisions for "emergency meeting", so to speak where you can avoid/stop meeting something in the IEP until a meeting is called. This was used with difficult child earlier in the year when they discovered he was supposed to be all in colab classes and he wasn't.

    Anyway, I have a question. difficult child is doing pretty good in school with the exception of English. He failed to mention vocab words and failed all the tests so far. I got a list for next week and there is no way (love him but have to be honest) my difficult child is going to get the spelling of these words - the meanings, no problem - the spelling, no way.

    There are also a couple other things that I want added into his IEP that were taken out like "written homework assignments" (at least the teacher or 1:1 writting them in his agenda).

    I'm not sure what kind of accoms can be made for spelling. Any ideas?

    Also, must we call an IEP meeting to make a couple additions to his IEP, or can we do that over the phone (I kinda remember that you can do this but I'm not sure)?

    Thanks.

    Sharon
     
  2. Sheila

    Sheila Moderator

    I'm not sure I understand your first paragraph. Are you thinking of the terminology "reconvene the IEP meeting?"

    Minor revisions to the IEP can be made without an IEP meeting. school district and parent must agree to the revisions in writing.
     
  3. LittleDudesMom

    LittleDudesMom Well-Known Member Staff Member

    Sorry, I just reread that first paragraph and it doesn't make much sense does it????

    I was referring to something being in the IEP that is not (or no longer) needed and mutually agreed upon by the school and the parent. The school would not be considered in violation if that thing (or things) was not being implemented from the time of that agreeance until the time of the next IEP meeting (could be an "emergancy meeting"). Does that make any sense?

    Anyway, so revisions can be made without a meeting as long as we both agree. Sounds good.

    Now I need to go hunting down some spelling mods!

    Thanks Sheila.

    Sharon
     
  4. Sheila

    Sheila Moderator

    lol. No problem.

    The agreement between parent and school district to modify the IEP should be in writing. It should attach to the IEP. It's my understanding that the school district would be in compliance as long as both parties sign.
     
  5. Martie

    Martie Moderator

    Sharon,

    The provisions are new to IDEA 2004 so the school district may or may not be aware. I still run across school district who put parents off saying the change is not worth the meeting (which they should not be saying--but they do.)

    Get it in writing, no matter how good your relationship with the school is....just in case.

    Martie
     
  6. svengandhi

    svengandhi Well-Known Member

    My son with expressive writing disorder and my son with dyslexia are both spelling exempt in their IEPs. They are not downgraded for spelling on inclass assignments or tests. It is something you have to ask for. I did not ask for it for my Aspie boy because he can spell when he wants to.
     
  7. LittleDudesMom

    LittleDudesMom Well-Known Member Staff Member

    Is there a specific test for expressive writing disorder? I've done a little research and this sounds like what difficult child has rather than a little dysgraphia.

    Thanks.

    Sharon
     
  8. Sheila

    Sheila Moderator

    Yes, there are a number of standardized tests for written expression. Plug "standardized tests for written expression" into google.
     
  9. Martie

    Martie Moderator

    Sharon,

    Can difficult child express himself well verbally? Oral and written are "parallel" but also separate processes. My easy child had an expressive language delay that did NOT manifest in written expression--only oral. This shows that it is possible to have one problem and not the other. Of course, it can also work the other way around: written but not oral.

    The reason I mention this is if difficult child is verbally fluent (and I think you have said he is,) then your concern is likely to be dismissed. Written expression, however, is NOT just putting verbal speech on paper.

    Martie
     
  10. LittleDudesMom

    LittleDudesMom Well-Known Member Staff Member

    Martie,

    you are correct. difficult child is verbally fluent, it's putting down the thoughts along with the mechanics that he gets blocked with. I used to think he had a little dysgraphia, but I don't think that's the case. I really think it's a "written word" issue and also a little disorganized thinking. However that last piece is probably due to not enough experience or emphasis in the past.

    He had to write a report on Henry Ford for his tech class. I have found that a successful way for us to work this stuff out is to have him use the computer to do a google search on his topic and then pick the two articles he likes the most. Then he prints those 2 off. We read them together (he a paragraph and me the next and so on) and he highlights what he thinks is important.

    Then we sit at the computer and he rereads the highlights and puts them in his own words, or dictates what he thought was interesting or important.

    The process of him making a web or an outline and then starting to write a draft is just daunting. And, his spelling is so incredibly bad that he gets frustrated with it.

    Thanks for your input Martie and Sheila. I couldn't do this without your support and wisdom!

    Sharon
     
  11. Martie

    Martie Moderator

    Sharon,

    I don't want to sound negative, but the method you describe will nt work as well when the going gets tougher (and writing is required in class.) I would seek remediation (after evaluation) NOW.

    This is an area where the difficult child needs to be a bit older for it to work because remediating requires meta-cognitive skills. I think your difficult child is about the right age.

    Martie
     
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