Removal from class

Discussion in 'Special Ed 101' started by Kjs, May 28, 2007.

  1. Kjs

    Kjs Guest

    Ok. I am totally frustrated. I have read over and over and still am confused. difficult child was tested two weeks ago. IEP last week.
    I do not have a hard copy of anything yet. I was told in the IEP by the school psychologist that he scored superior in all area's except visual, that was below average. She drew a little graph to explain that to me. Said she noticed severe anxiety prior to the test. Extreame fear of failure. that was that.

    Ok. He is removed from a class every day. From anything like, laughing (somebody did or said something funny) to yelling at the teacher. He stays in the office anywhere from just that class period to the entire day. I am not informed of this, only from difficult child IF I ask.
    He is written up on referrals practically every single day. Much of this I put on the teachers. It has gotten to a point with me that I feel the teachers are competing to see who can make difficult child blow up first. :grrr: Granted some issues difficult child brings on himself, he needs no help. Many of the times one teacher will tell him one thing, he does that and the other will yell at him. They know, we discussed this, that IF you approach him in a way such as yelling, he will react immediately yelling back. This will cause him to be removed. And a referral written up.
    From the information I read, is it correct that he cannot be removed for more than 10 cumulative days without meeting to discuss change of placement? What if he is removed for 3 hours each day, or 2 hours one day 4 hours next day. How does the partial removal add up?
    Please correct me if I am wrong here. Am I understanding it correctly when it states a child cannot be disciplined if the reason is a direct result of manifestation of their disorder/illness/disability?
    So, when he is yelled at (they all know this) he immediately reacts impulsively. He even sometimes will go back later and apologize stating he should not have reacted that way, he wasn't thinking, he needs to think first...He can't help it at the time..This impulsive behavior IS a direct result of his disability. So, is there anything I can do to keep him in class so he can learn? His auditory skills were supurb. His visual below average. He is removed from class, (removal from auditory learning) and handed papers to work on (visual). Not going to do well. What can I do to keep him in class. What can I have added to IEP ? I haven't recieved hard copy of anything. Was told by SW that FBA wasn't warranted because he is impulsive and there are not specific triggers. I would like to get this all in writing on IEP before the end of the year. It will help with placement for the next year.
     
  2. Sheila

    Sheila Moderator

    Some of this I addressed in one of your other threads.

    "10 day suspension tracking" thread is in the Sp Ed Archives. This is a link. http://www.conductdisorders.com/com...pension-tracking-letter-of-clarification.667/

    We sometimes assume that teachers automatically know how to approach each student. That's not true, and they get frustrated dealing with-reoccuring problems just like we do.

    Based on what you've written, he is sometimes being "triggered" by a teacher. Behavior modifications may need to be written into the IEP. This type information and how to approach the problem should be written in the "Recommendations" section of the evaluation report(s).
     
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