Sensory Integration Dysfunction advice needed!

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Archives' started by -, Nov 1, 2002.

  1. Guest

    Today difficult child 2 had his 3 year check up. I told the doctor about his recent diagnosis of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and in explaining his symptoms the doctor said "sounds to me like Sensory Integration Dysfunction". From my reading I've suspected that he has Sensory Integration Disorder (SID) as well as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), too.

    But I'm not nearly as versed in Sensory Integration Disorder (SID) as I am Bi-Polar, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), & Depression. I'd appreciate any input. Any anyone dealt with this "Occupational Therapy"? Does it work? Or seem to help? I'm out of my element and want to think & talk intelligently when he gets evaluated soon. I have to admit, it sounds like it fits him & it would explain a lot. Thanks for any insight. /importthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
  2. Guest

    An excellent book on the subject is "The Out-of-Sync Child" by Carol Stock Kranowitz.

    Two thumbs up for the doctor. Seems to be rare that they recognize the symptoms -- pediatrician or p-doctor.

    Be aware that all Occupational Therapist (OT)'s are not the same. You'll want someone that specializes in pediatric Occupational Therapist (OT) and if at all possible is licensed to perform the Sensory Integration Disorder (SID) testing. There's a specific one that is most thorough -- can't remember the name. Will post it tomorrow or Sunday. Sorry -- gotta run.
  3. Guest

    As a Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) kid mine has been doing sensory integration training of one sort or another for years. It's a basic component of any Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) program. And relatively easy to do at home.

    What kinds of symptoms are you talking about? There was a thread on this board a couple of months ago with suggestions for things to do at home. maybe one of the moderators can find it.
  4. Guest

    hey susie, we're just figuring this out with my difficult child also.

    alisha, is it sensory integration & praxis testing you're thinking of???

    my guy is on hold for Occupational Therapist (OT) assess. as he has been regresing big time, hates change and new things/people, and an Occupational Therapist (OT) assess would probably be too hard on him right now (plus we're already onto this, and are doing lots of different exercises with him already).

    do read the out-of-sync-child. excellent book, plus read all the links you can, and this will start to make sense to you.

    good luck, del
  5. Faithful-Heart

    Faithful-Heart New Member

    Nate has this also...though he got tested early and got treatment through and Occupational Therapist (OT) also and was 'deamed' ok with it now. Well I still see it but its not as bad as it used to be for sure. Though he still hates change but I think that is just due to being a difficult child all around.

    There is a post from me in the general archives...something about kids that don't like to change clothes. Nate would wear the same clothes for days! It was awful. the reason for this I was told is with a Sensory Integration Disorder (SID) kid just the feel of clothes can set them off so when they get used to the feel of the clothes they have on they don't want to change and have to adjust to the feel of new clothes! Tags bother them, sock not on just right...oh so many things.

    They can be undersentive to some things...overly sentive to other things. Which ever way it goes it is to the extreme. Like Nate was senitive to clothes but yet would be outside in freezing wheather and not seem to feel it. Or out in over 100 degree wheather and not realize how hot it was. He also was unable to tell when he was hungry or thristy...would just throw a fit! ack!

    We also went through a spell of fighting about bath time. He would just refuse to take a bath. Like he couldn't stand the water. Some days were better then other days. Also and Sensory Integration Disorder (SID) kids have very usual fears about things..things that most people wouldn't find frightening or unreal being convinced there was a ghost in their room...stuff like that.

    Then on the flip side...they can be fearless! Nate used to scare the daylights out of me because he had no fear of heights at all! He would get himself in very dangerous situations because of this. After having Occupational Therapist (OT) for a year he finally developed a fear of heights and now knows when he is hungry or too hot or too cold.

    The more stressed he is though the more 'things' just bother him. He used to go off if something just didn't feel right, work right, look right or taste right. He is better mostly. Also eating can be a problem with these kids. Like I couldn't get Nate to eat fruit...he is a little better in that area but not as good as I would like to see. He didn't like the 'feel' of fruit in his mouth. Usually it was cold, the texture of fruit is different then most foods. He just couldn't handle fruit or raw vegatables. Though he could eat bananas. and cooked vegatables.

    When they are really little and can't really tell you what the problem is...its SOOOO hard...cause it seems they are throwing fits over every tiny thing and you have no clue! Then they throw fits cause you don't understand them! And they are frustrated about that! ha!

    We did 'brushing' at home and deep muscle exercises too. Its difficult to explain what these are without being able to show you. The Occupational Therapist (OT) showed us how to do these and wanted me to do them every night with him. It helps to desentense(?)....make him NOT so sentive to things.

    I was have that book mentioned in the above replies and its important to get this treatment done before age seven when the brain becomes more 'set'..after that its much harded to help them.

    Hope this helps
  6. Guest

    That's the one, del. Sensory Integration & Praxis Testing aka SIPT