Shaving, anger and new words

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by TerryJ2, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    difficult child has worn a moustache for weeks now. Silly but no big deal. But now he desperately needs to shave. He looks awful. It's patchy and dirty looking. He's not old enough. I told him last night that he absolutely has to shave, because he looks like a ragamuffin.
    :fightings:
    "I DO NOT LOOK LIKE A RAGAMUFFIN!" pause "I don't even know WHAT A RAGAMUFFIN IS!!!"

    rofl!:rofl:
     
  2. Tiapet

    Tiapet Old Hand

    LOL that's funny! :)
     
  3. Hope2

    Hope2 bluemoon

    I know my grandsons doctors have always said they need to be allowed to make some decisions in their lives after the age of about 13.......I know you hate how he looks but could you put up with it for awhile and see what he does..maybe school will tell him to clean up..you know always better coming from someone else...
     
  4. AnnieO

    AnnieO Shooting from the Hip

    Jett has dark hair (from bio), and has a "permanently dirty" upper lip.

    He has decided shaving will hurt.

    This should be fun...
     
  5. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    Step, shaving only hurts if you use the electric razor in the shower, which my son did a few mo's ago, lol! He got a really clean shave, though. husband got a new razor ... :)
     
  6. AnnieO

    AnnieO Shooting from the Hip

    :rofl:

    OMG, OMG, OMG!!! husband has a wet/dry electric razor as do I...

    Nah, Jett just thinks, razor=knife=OW. We're still trying to get him to cut his own meat properly.
     
  7. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Step? That's another symptom of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD)...
    difficult child has already declared that he will ONLY use an electric razor... "at least until he's 30"... He KNOWS a blade is NOT what he's up to using yet!
     
  8. keista

    keista New Member

    my son wears a mustache, always has. I think he's shaved it maybe 4 times. He's only 16. I do have to get on him to clean up the rest of his face though.

    Anyway, for those beginning shavers who are scared, I had purchased one of those personal shavers for son, and he loved it! Easy to control and not intimidating at all. Yes, it's the same thing they market to women for cleaning up their bikini lines, but they have them in black for men. We first tuned into it because son had unibrow issues and was being teased about it.
     
  9. buddy

    buddy New Member

    OH good grief, Q does not cut anything either, gets too frustrated. I dread shaving (why he has no facial hair yet I dont know, he is a hairy kid...kind of in his genes I would think (italian, african american, hispanic)....but maybe God is giving me a break here.

    I fear he will LOVE the shaver and not worry about injury just not be coordinated enough and then what??? by by hair on head, arms, private areas, oh my....I dread it.

    So, you have to wait to see how it grows in to decide what to use??? like the little personal one versus the electric normal one?? Maybe I can get his Integrated Listening Systems (ILS) worker to teach him???? UGGG.
     
  10. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    I had to look up Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD).
    I don't think my son has it. He doesn't like to cut his meat, either. But he can light matches and has smoked a cig and weed. Nothing wrong with-THOSE fingers.
     
  11. buddy

    buddy New Member

    sometimes I swear our kids share a brain. ROFL
     
  12. keista

    keista New Member

    :rofl: Amazing how fragmented their skills are, huh?

    by the way I loved the "what's a ragamuffin?" comment.
     
  13. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    OK. me and my educator hat.

    Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). Developmental Coordination Disorder.
    Doesn't mean they can't ... it means that:
    1) coordinated neuromotor skills take significantly more effort to learn
    2) not all skills can be fully mastered
    3) may affect gross skills and not fine, or fine skills and not gross... or both.

    Therefore, (assuming just for argument that Terry's son HAS Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD)... not saying he does)...
    I'd be guessing that he has put a LOT of effort into mastering the fine motor skills related to smoking, and not much effort into learning the fine motor skills for dining.

    It's exactly these kinds of things that make it so that schools do NOT believe that Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) exists. If you just try hard enough, you can do whatever has to be done. AND THEY CAN'T. Because they cannot sustain the effort, or cannot take it to the next level. difficult child can do calligraphy and origami... but cannot take notes listening to a lecture. He can't coordinate input and output simultaneously. It takes so much effort to write that he can't listen. That's just ONE example.

    The problem has been known for generations, but brushed off. It's assumed that kids will grow out of it (they don't). Its also assumed that more effort will make a difference (it does... it literally kills the kids). But the impact is HUGE - in-class problems, but also huge social impact.

    Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a stand-alone diagnosis. If you have Aspergers or Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), they won't give you the diagnosis, because... those problems can also be imbedded in the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) diagnosis. But the symptoms and challenges and accommodations are identical.
     
  14. DaisyFace

    DaisyFace Love me...Love me not

    LOL! Oh my goodness - that is funny!
     
  15. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    :choir::choir:He shaved!!!! Yaaaayyy!!!!
     
  16. buddy

    buddy New Member

    :hi5: *YIPPEE!!!!
     
  17. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    That's weird, Insane. I never knew that!
     
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