Ships Don't Sink

Discussion in 'Parent Emeritus' started by Albatross, Mar 2, 2016.

  1. Albatross

    Albatross Well-Known Member

    Ships don't sink because of the water around them. Ships sink because of the water that gets in them. Don't let what's happening around you get inside you and weigh you down.
     
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  2. Kalahou

    Kalahou Active Member

    Good one, Albatross. I like this analogy. Perhaps a key is knowing the vulnerable places where leaks can start, and using the toolbox regularly to prevent or quickly stop any leaks from gaining headway.
    Take care.
     
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  3. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    And keeping your pump in good working order.

    We can be grateful that we have some good friends here with working pumps to help bail us out when we start filling up with too much "water"...
     
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  4. Feeling Sad

    Feeling Sad Active Member

    Ditto. It is also not fearing to go into the water again...and not remaining dry docked.

    Also, it is not having the fear of 'sharks'. Leave it to me to take it to that level... Sorry.
     
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  5. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    You were just brave enough to actually say it! (I thought it, then filtered... )
     
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  6. New Leaf

    New Leaf Well-Known Member

    Love this Albatross. Thank you for the visualization.

    On the canoe, when the waves are rough, we add a canvas on the top, it is tightly covering exposed areas, to keep water from coming in. We also have bailers to throw the water out, when it does come in.

    I liken this to the proactive work we need to do to, to keep the "water" from coming in and sinking us. CD, support groups, reading, and also playful, fun stuff, exercise, hobbies, outings.

    Every once in a while the water does come in, we need to work hard not to sink, recognize it and bail it out.
    Paddling with ankle deep water, adds about 200 pounds to our load.

    Sometimes, we "huli" (turn over). It takes everyone in the crew to work at righting the canoe, bail out the water and continue on the course.

    I thank all of you here for being awesome crew mates, helping to right the canoe, and keep me going.

    You all are just wonderful.
    [​IMG]

    Words cannot express my gratitude.

    Mahalo nui loa!
    leafy
     
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  7. toughlovin

    toughlovin Well-Known Member

    And even if water does get in and the canoe or ship sinks.... It is important to know how to swim so that you still survive!
     
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  8. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    And others out there, who haven't faced what we face, wonder why we keep our life jackets on even in calm seas. We have seen things on the seas that they don't know exist. Like sneaker waves. Catching unawares.
     
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  9. SheSails

    SheSails New Member

    I am in stormy seas. It did indeed start with a sneaker set that crashed over the coaming gushing white water into my previously cozy saloon. My ship has journeyed many thorny paths and the pump has faithfully taken care of a lot of water in her bilges. But I wonder if it's strong enough to deal with yet another watery tempest. Perhaps the scars left by journeys past have weakened the ribs and timber that hold my ship together. I fear my life jacket is in tatters and I should have been more prepared. How did I not see it coming? I'm facing cold waters at the helm of my vessel.

    Thanks for the luxury of this analogue.
     
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  10. Carri

    Carri Active Member

    I love the heck out of this post and all the comments too... good stuff!
     
  11. Devasted Mom

    Devasted Mom Member

    How true each and every one of these analogies are. These are words to live by. I want to just thank each and every one of my shipmates here. Threw my life preserver to me when I needed it most.
     
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  12. Tanya M

    Tanya M Living with an attitude of gratitude Staff Member

    Great posts all of you!!

    Our ships may be weathered and worn and at times we may even take on some water but it is because of all we have endured that we are skilled sailors.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Albatross

    Albatross Well-Known Member

    I have really enjoyed reading what everyone got out of that. Thanks fellow travelers!
     
  14. Lil

    Lil Well-Known Member

    My ship is floundering at the moment. :( Not quite sunk though.
     
  15. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Here. Borrow my pump. Need a tow-line? The storm might be pretty bad, but you aren't the only one out in this sea.
     
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  16. New Leaf

    New Leaf Well-Known Member

    I have some extra paddles............:unsure: Prayers going up for the bilge pump to kick in......
    leafy
     
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  17. Lil

    Lil Well-Known Member

    Actually, it's more accurate to say my son's ship is floundering...but he loves to catch me in the undertow. Thanks ladies.
     
  18. New Leaf

    New Leaf Well-Known Member

    Prayers going up for your son to find a way to get his "ship" together :oops: and sail on smoother waters.
    Take care Lil, it will be okay.

    (((HUGS)))
    leafy
     
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  19. Carri

    Carri Active Member

    Ship together. Haha. Thanks for that...
     
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