the ball is rolling

Discussion in 'Special Ed 101' started by Ktllc, Feb 26, 2013.

  1. Ktllc

    Ktllc New Member

    The school seems to be taking the testing for potential IEP seriously. But as always, I'd rather be prepared and not blindly trust them.
    Here is what is planned: educational testing (done already), psychlogical testing (to be scheduled yet), completed ABAS-II and BASC-2 (made copy for myself) I think it relates to functional assessment, meeting on Friday with a resource teacher and principal. A diagnostician will also be involved but I'm not sure what she will do. His eyes and ears will also be checked (but that is done privately on a regular basis. V actually received new glasses a couple days ago)
    So far, that is all the info I have. I'm sure I might know more on Friday after the meeting.
    Any questions I should ask? Anything more I should request?
    V has lots of issues with retaining information. It is a big issue at home and I'm sure it is a problem at school as well. His Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) sent me her favorite quote from V during his session yesterday: "I'm a good forgetter!" I can't type it without laughing! lol
    As usual, any advice welcome.
     
  2. JJJ

    JJJ Active Member

    What is the school doing for "educational testing" and "psychological testing"?
     
  3. Ktllc

    Ktllc New Member

    I really do not know. I assume it will be discussed on Friday... Last time I talked with the school, the autism specialist was going to go over V's file to determine what needs to be done. He just had an Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) evaluation done in September by "the best" so I don't believe those tests should be repeated (ados, scars, and other theory of mind tests).
     
  4. buddy

    buddy New Member

    ROFLMAO ...a good forgetter! Well we all need to be good at something!
     
  5. TeDo

    TeDo CD Hall of Fame

    Is the school going to do Occupational Therapist (OT) and Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) evaluations? Since those are areas you KNOW are problems, they should do those too so there is a plan there for accommodations and possible services.

    Good insight on V's part. At least he knows that's an issue so accommodations for that should be built into an IEP and it won't be any surprise to him.
     
  6. Ktllc

    Ktllc New Member

    I thought I would let you know how things went today... sorry if it is not super organized but I have a lot going on. But I'm hanging there! I promiss, if not you will see a "vent thread" pretty soon. haha
    3 people were there: resouce teacher (tarvels between schools), K. teacher and Special Education teacher at the school (fultime with- one class of spec. ed. I believe).
    Resource teacher showed me all the areas that would be tested, her few notes when she observed V. Her notes were all pretty positive "hard working" "attentive" "social" "polite and freindly", etc... which I am not surprised. It is all true. I did not comment on her small comments about his good social skills. She cannot possibly know his true difficulties by just a couple observation. Theu have the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) diagnosis on file.
    The K teacher then checked numerous boxes for areas she feels he needs to be tested. Everything in Math and reading, some in general living skills (social and safety concerns), some in Occupational Therapist (OT) area (writing, copying, transitioning,etc..) and some in emotional/behavior (high activity level, distractabilty, following directions, social understanding and more).
    I agreed to it.
    I also had to sign a form that stated that V is at risk of being retained. I wrote that I did not agree to it but my signature meant that I agknowledge receipt. K- teacher said that she does not think retaining is good for V but that the form was mandatory procedure. It does not mean that V will be retained.
    The resource teacher asked a few questions about why V works on blue paper and about his over lay. I explained about Irlen sysndrom (who and how he got tested) but also explained that it is NOT a magic bullet or even the only cause of his issues. It one small extra help. The sped teacher than started pitching in with "oh, so he has a diagnosis". the other 2 say yes.
    I thought her comment was a bit off, so I clarified that Irlen syndrom was by no mean the main diagnosis. V has Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).
    Gosh, you should have seen her face and eyes! Fro that point she became REALLY active in the meeting. It was all business. She even apologized ahead of time in case things come back as only being "developpmentally delays". She says it is just the way the school categorizes issues until they are 8. I thought she tried to imply that she knows that it can be frustrating to hear when one knows that a child does not grow out of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).
    All in all, I don't think there are much to do or say until I get the results. They added testing for visual perception integration at my request.
    They confirmed that we won't meet until end of April, their agenda is overbooked...
    Wait and see I suppose.
     
  7. TeDo

    TeDo CD Hall of Fame

    That meeting sounds very productive. It was interesting to read about the SpEd teacher's change in attitude after the Irlen syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) diagnosis's were mentioned. Hmmmm Glad things are moving in the right direction!! Way to go Warrior Mom.
     
  8. buddy

    buddy New Member

    You did great. Our early childhood categories are the same. We can switch to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in K. But through age 7 most are listed daughter which encompases everything so works the same here.

    You can double check with your advocate to see if you can check Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) from the get go.....the sp ed teacher may be saying what they prefer rather than what they can do.

    You've had an intense day. Let us know what the doctor says about Partner. Said a prayer for him. I remember well how scared Q was feeling like that.
     
Loading...