This article have been written about me.

Discussion in 'Healthful Living / Natural Treatments' started by Fran, Apr 18, 2008.

  1. Fran

    Fran Former Site Owner

    All they need to add is impulse eating and rewarding myself eating. Basically I like treats for comfort, happiness, sadness,boredom etc. Pitiful isn't it? Food used to be just fuel when I was a kid.


    This is another article from the SparkPeople site.



    Get a Handle on Emotional Eating

    The Secret Sabotage of Your Program

    -- By Zach Van Hart, Staff Writer

    Ever been angry or upset one minute and then on your couch eating the next, unable to remember why you started eating or how long you had spent munching? If so, then you have entered the world of emotional eating. It’s something than can happen to anyone, and one of the most common dieting obstacles out there.

    Emotional eating at its best passes after a few minutes. At its worst, it can take over your life and cause you to eat uncontrollably for extended periods of time. And according to nutritional experts, 75% of overeating is caused by emotions. So don’t worry, if you suffer from emotional eating, you are not alone.

    People often eat to relieve stress or to get something off their minds. The kicker is that stress, and the insulin jump that goes with it, may actually cause you to crave high sugar, high carbohydrate foods – foods that go straight to your waistline and cause you even more stress.

    Rather than munching, it's better to develop new skills for dealing with boredom, self-esteem issues and stress. Try to pinpoint the major reasons for your stress or unpleasant emotions, and see how you can turn the tide. Here are a few suggestions to combat your emotions:


    • Get your trigger foods out of the house, get your crutch foods out of arms' reach
    • Go for a walk or jog. Physical activity relieves stress.
    • Do deep breathing and relaxation exercises
    • Keep a reminder of your goal handy
    • Talk to a friend
    • Visit and post on the support message boards
    • Surround yourself with positive reinforcers, like pictures and people
    • Keep a journal that includes your best personal accomplishments
    • Track your eating patterns, including when and why you pick up food.
    If you still seem to come back to food when your emotions get the best of you, you can at least be prepared. Eating large amounts of snacks is not a good thing. But if you eat low calorie foods, it’s not so bad. So stock the fridge with healthy alternatives--foods that have good nutritious value and are smaller in size. Here are a few food suggestions to keep within arms' reach:
    • Apple or orange slices
    • Carrot sticks
    • Banana
    • Broccoli
    • Whole wheat toast
    • Bran muffin
    • Fruit smoothie
    • Applesauce
    (I add 100cal low fat popcorn to this list when I'm craving salt and crunchy stuff-it helps. Sugar free popsicles and sugar free jello is another sweet for me)
     
  2. SearchingForRainbows

    SearchingForRainbows Active Member

    Fran,

    This is a great article!!! I NEVER keep trigger foods in my house. Honestly, I don't really believe there is any such thing as willpower. I don't know anyone who is able to stay away from trigger foods forever just using willpower.

    I always keep apples and bananas in my kitchen. Whenever I have a craving that I know isn't healthy, I eat an apple first. This usually works for me. By the time I'm finished with the apple, I either don't have the craving, or I end up eating less of whatever it is that wanted in the first place. I got this tip from a book I read last year. Also, I find that bananas are filling.

    Although I've been able to keep my emotional eating under control, I know, deep down, I'll probably always be an emotional eater. Slowly, I'm learning to substitute my cravings with healthy alternatives like fruit. Believe me, it took a long time before I was able to feel satisfied from just eating a piece of fruit, lol!!! WFEN
     
  3. LittleDudesMom

    LittleDudesMom Well-Known Member Staff Member

    Fran,

    thanks for posting this. This is the kind of information we get at our weekly WW meetings. It's a help when it's discussed and many of the folks around you are shaking their heads saying "uhhuh".

    Sharon
     
  4. Hound dog

    Hound dog Nana's are Beautiful

    Good post.

    I keep known trigger food out of the house. Most I can resist after a certain period of time but there are a couple that I just can't look at and not eat. lol
     
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