Welcome Frustrated 440, Intro Post

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by SRL, Sep 18, 2007.

  1. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    (Frustrated--I copied your post to a new thread as you'll get more individualized replies that way. I'll reply below. SRL)


    Hello, I am new to this site and I came across your reply and had some questions if you have the time. I have a 3 yr. 3 mo. old son. He hasn't started to ask "why" questions yet which I saw that you also mentioned in one of your responses to someone. So I guess I just wanted to know of anyone's experiences. I really don't have any answers for my son, everyone that I've taken him to says I really have to get him into preschool and see what happens. First I've had some questions about his speech. He is very verbal but does repeat sometimes. Like sometimes he will respond back to me with some of the words I used to talk to him. Also he can't answer all my questions like..."what did you do today?" or other open ended type questions. He is very loving, and loves to play with- his little brother and other children at school. He has just started to go to school but doesnt seem to get the whole concept of school. I think he thinks it is a play group situation which is all he knows. He has never been in a daycare and we have only left him with- my parents just once in awhile but hardly ever. At school he seems to seperate from me easily it's just that he wants to play and not do tasks asked of him or he won't see them through. He also doesnt want to sit at carpet for very long he would rather get into the new things he sees there. Other people I talk to say its normal for his age but the teacher today said that she had someone come in from the church office to help with- him because she can't give him her total attention. I dont expect her to, but my husband and I are sending him to school now so that he can be taught structure and get used to it. I am frustrated because I thought you send a child to preschool to learn this stuff but his teacher acts like he should already be able to do all of this. I also just learned that this is her 1st year teaching here. She is older and has a ed. degree but chose to stay home with- her children for awhile. He also has done some hand flapping, but that has gotten much better as I have realized that I should probably try to redirect him so he doesnt stand out amongst his peers. Other than that, he really is a good little boy. He has his moments but nothing that I ever thought was not normal for his age. He does like me to still do alot for him but I never realized how much I did too much for him until his brother came along. He has good imaginative play. Sometimes it does seem like his emotions could be inappropriate, but I am a very emotional person and so is my mom so I dont know if I should be worried because to me he just seems sensitive like us or could there be a problem? He also doesnt show much interest in learning how to pedal a bike. I'm just trying to think of all the concerns or worries I might have. I might have missed one...anything you can tell me about your experiences would be great and sorry this was sooo long. Thank you!
     
  2. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    Welcome Frustrated, I'm glad that you found us.

    If you had described a 3 year old who wasn't complying with his preschool teacher's every demand, I wouldn't be concerned at all. 3 year old preschool isn't for every child--truthfully it's become more common as there are more mothers in the workforce and as education is being pushed at an earlier age. Some kids are ready, some kids aren't, and personally I wouldn't worry one iota about it if my child wasn't ready for preschool at age 3. I'd probably even take the comment about a new teacher needing help with a grain of salt.

    However, what did catch my attention was the hand flapping along with some possible speech differences or delays. Both of these are red flags for Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) or Autistic Spectrum Disorders. While we commonly think of children with Autism as not developing speech child with the highest functioning form develop early speech but then often start to fall behind with higher skills such as answering and asking questions. (That was our first clue that something was amiss: my husband would come home and ask how my son's day was and he would answer "Yes.") 3 years, 3 months is still really young for speech in a boy but if I were in your shoes I would rather be safe than sorry because early speech help makes much further gains than waiting until they are older. Having a specialist in the area of occupational therapy do an assessment will also help you get a grasp on whether his self help skills are lagging due to motor skill problems.

    When he repeats, is he echoing back as in if you ask "Would you like a cookie?" instead of saying "Yes" he's repeating the question back to you? This is called echolalia. It also often shows up in the form of kids repeating chunks of videos, tv, or books verbatim. At first it looks like a bright kid but it's a sign that they are struggling with developing normal verbal speech and they are inserting speech they've memorized instead.

    We're just parents here so obviously we can't diagnose but we can point you in some directions to research. You might want to look around at the site below and see if it seems to fit anyone in your family tree. I also should emphasize that these traits don't always point to this cluster of disorders but the hand flapping especially would suggest to me it's worth checking out.
    http://www.aspergersyndrome.org/
     
  3. frustrated440

    frustrated440 New Member

    Hello and thanks for your response. I guess I should have told you alittle more about myself. I am familiar with austism spectrum disorders as I am a special needs aide at the school district here where we live. I work with- autistic kids and have worked with- aspergers child. My son however doesnt seem to fit in either and Im also aware of how broad the spectrum is. I have had the speech teacher do data on my son. She said that his speech is usually 3 wds. per sentence or phrase. She said to watch him but he seems to be alittle delayed and leans toward more of a older 2 yr. old speech than 3 but wasnt really concerned but to keep an eye on him. He has had a speech evaluation and Occupational Therapist (OT) evaluation at a nearby hospital. Both want to work with- him but I was waiting until I got the school situation figured out before I put too much on him. As far as the school thing goes, I have pretty much lost all my confidence in where he is currently enrolled due to the fact that I talked with- the teachers where I work and they both thought that his current teacher sounds inexperienced and said I should observe their preschool and see that there are many kids who are my son's age and have trouble staying on task and things like that. As far as him having asperger's, he isnt obsessed with- certain topics and doesnt sound professor like. I did do the Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) questionaire on childbrain and he did not have a high enough score on it. The speech teacher at school has also pointed out other children who have hand flapped at school but are not autistic. When I saw that you put down that your child had "autistic traits" I was very interested in your experiences because the speech teacher also said that just because my son might have a couple of characteristics does not mean he is autistic. Have you found that your child is on the spectrum or does he just have some traits? All the experts he has seen just say in his case its more of a get him into school and see how he does. They say he has alot of pluses, as he loves other children and if it was up to him, he would socialize and play at school only. But again we are sending him to learn structure. I still might send him to the public school preschool I just dont know if he is mature enough to do it. The teachers there seem to believe he would be successful there. Anything you can tell me about whether your child's traits turned into him being on the spectrum and if you remember anything he did at this age would be helpful because I just dont have anyone to compare him to. Thanks so much and again sorry this is so long!
     
  4. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    If you have some background already that will help. I wondered because most parents wouldn't know the terminology for hand flapping.

    My child has some Autistic traits but is not on the spectrum. He was Hyperlexic (started reading at age 2) which is what clued the doctors in right away to look in the direction of Autism when we had his evaluation done at age 5. His early speech was normal and even advanced early on but then started showing delays when the demands became too complex for him to compensate for (W-H questions, pronouns, sequencing, reciprocal conversation). He had sensory issues and was paradoxically a good natured kid until he didn't get his way and then look out world! He was very obsessive, first letters, then a series of the typical geeky interests such as marine life, geology, geography, etc. Socially he always engaged with us and enjoyed being with other kids but as he got older the teachers noticed he would ditch the kids for his activities, wanted to talk fairly exclusively about his interests, and was missing social cues (social, but not always socially appropriate). A few months after he turned 5 he took his head out of the books and started into typical kid interests and developed interest in friends and playdates. That was a turning point for him and except for a year he struggled with severe anxiety he has looked progressively less Autistic to the point that in 3rd grade his teachers reported he was indistinguishable from other children. I have always thought that the term "spectrumish" describes him best. He always has been, and to this day still is, very subject to environment changes and if he were to have some serious stressors in his life I would bet the traits would be at higher levels than they are.

    He had no early intervention as we didn't know what was up when he was young but I am an at home mom and he got a lot of "intensive parenting". The specialists that saw him were amazed at how far he'd come without formal therapy and suspect that what he got at home was equivalent. Often it was just instinctively responding to his needs--for instance when he was a seriously fussy baby he spent a lot of time swaddled tightly in a blanket, being held with all the eye contact, etc. that goes along with it.

    If I knew early on what I know now, I would have had him in speech and Occupational Therapist (OT) from very early on, even though he was functioning at home and preschool with the skills he had. I didn't realize until my third child came along how behind his fine motor skills were, plus it was very deceiving because he could write very legible sentences when he was 3 1/2. Children who are good compensators can get around some speech and/or Occupational Therapist (OT) issues but it sure would be easier for them if issues are addressed when they first become apparent.

    Honestly I wouldn't worry about the preschool thing too much--he's young and it could easily be the wrong teacher or wrong school for him. If it continues you might try switching and see if it makes a difference or pulling him and waiting it out another year. In the whole scheme of life, 3 year old preschool is relatively unimportant--there's a lot of educational years left ahead of him.

    Hope this helps.
    SRL
     
  5. frustrated440

    frustrated440 New Member

    Thanks SRL for responding. Well I had talked to a mom of child who has asperger's that I worked with. She also mentioned hyperlexic but I'm not sure about that either. My son does recognize logos but only after I tell him what it says and then he remembers it. The reading part I dont think so because he will go up to another logo on my youngest walker for example and he'll say "sesame street mommy" and it will say Graco so I'm not sure that hyperlexic fits him either. He can go through small Dr. Seuss story books and recall the story page by page but I've read it to him a million times. Its more like he has an amazing memory but that also runs in my family. I have a middle sister with- an amazing memory. She didnt have to study that much for tests in school. She could read something and retain it well and I could also memorize info in school to help me with- tests. As far as his health goes both of my children have been totally healthy happy children. Both were or are very content babies, good sleepers that kind of thing. However my son does seem to have some anxiety I guess when he feels he's being tested in some way or that something is expected of him he starts to whine and not want to comply. He also might whine when a stranger asks him a question. He does have original speech but sometimes repeats to me what I have said, not in a question tone like I asked but in response, for example i'll say..."do you want some juice?" He'll reply, "want juice mommy" instead of yes or no response. The more I work with him on things, he has improved. He mixes up pronouns but the more I work with- him the better he gets. He is using "I" more instead of "you", but still needs improvment. I'm just kind of at a loss. He just seems to have some issues, but no one can say for sure if its something he will grow out of or should I be concerned? Everyone like I said is pretty much in agreement of "wait and see." I plan on taking him to speech and Occupational Therapist (OT) weekly after I get the school situation worked out. I keep looking for more and more answers but it seems all I can do is wait. Maybe he is like your son in the way he might just have some traits but not necessarily on the spectrum. No one in our family has autism or anything but I wish I would not of gotten him 2 doses of a flu vacine. I did it because I work in the school system and it seemed like I would bring the germs back to him (colds and flu stuff). Little did I know then that it had thimerisol in it still. I am going to do things differently with- my youngest and already have been. He is 10 mos. old and so far is developing normally. Who knows my oldest is 3 and it could be just some traits, but I wonder if not for some of the vaccines he might be completely different because I don't know how else to explain these difficulties being that no one in our family has had some of these things to deal with- except my oldest sister did say that her oldest son who is now 21 had to go to Occupational Therapist (OT) for certain things that she sees in my 3 year old like...needing some more fine motor strength and rotating feet when climbing stairs. He also had speech when he was younger. He is not autistic and is currently in the National Guard, so maybe my son's issues could be more like my nephew's. I guess time will tell, it is just frustrating because I worrier by nature and I just want my children to be healthy and have the best start in life possible like any other mom.
     
  6. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    You'd know if he was Hyperlexic or leaning in that direction by now. Your walls would be covered with penciled letters and you'd be tripping over magnet letters strewn all over the place.

    I am guessing the fact that you have experience working with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) kids has made you far more aware of the traits than most parents would be. In contrast I had a very strong willed, precocious reading, alphabet obsessed, eye contact avoiding kid who was doing some lining up of toys and I hadn't a clue as to what I was looking at where it would have been pretty obvious to a knowledgable professional...and I considered myself an educated, observant parent. Many neurotypical children have problems with anxiety or progress atypically or a little slow in speech or aren't super strong in their motor skills somewhere along the way. My NT daughter had some minor anxiety issues and face recognition problems when younger but has sense outgrown them. My oldest was pretty typical but was fairly tactile sensitive and has some fine motor weaknesses that I wished in hindsight I would have had him assessed for. The bottom line difference between my NT kids and my spectrumish kid is functioning. It sounds like to me that you're an observant enough and concerned enough parent to know if issues step over that line. Let's hope that day doesn't arise but I think you'll know. Until then, I think you can relax unless things suddenly change.

    Given what you are describing I'd suggest as a safeguard following up with the speech and Occupational Therapist (OT) and take a wait and see approach on the rest. I also wouldn't judge his ability to handle a classroom setting or structure based on this one preschool experience. And don't kick yourself about the shots--there's no going back and undoing what's been done.
     
  7. frustrated440

    frustrated440 New Member

    Thanks so much again SLR. It's nice just talking to someone who has a child with some AS traits and also speaking with- another mom and also someone experienced with the whole school setting. I will say like tonight I had my mom over for her birthday. I just never have time to do anything in the evenings with mine and my husbands schedules so I invited a ton of family over for cake. It was so crazy with- older cousins and family everywhere, it just makes me at least feel good that both my sons seemed to really enjoy all of it, which would be very unlike an autistic characteristic. I know the spectrum is broad, but I can say that even the mild kids I've worked with at school, just the noise alone would of gotten to them. Hopefully everything will be ok. I just pray for my kids and even though I tend to second guess and even beat myself up over things I wish I could of done differently, I always remind myself that God has a plan for my children and that everything is in His hands. I just need to learn to relax and enjoy them, because to me they both are like little presents that I get to open everyday. Again, thanks so much for listening and letting me know of your experiences because it really does help to hear other mom's similar experiences or concerns.
     
  8. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    My son was like yours. He had trouble understanding "w" questions. He repeated. I'd see a developmental pediatrician or, better, a neuropsychologist. He could well be on the autism spectrum, high functioning. I'd also test him for school interventions...the earlier this behavior is worked on the better the prognosis. I was told lots of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) kids have trouble with "why" questions. If I asked my son, "What's your name?" he wouldn't answer or he'd say "name." But he knew his name. If we called him, he would come. He is now fourteen and has Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified. Ally Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) kids are different. My son was always fine with crowds and noise.
     
  9. Mrs Smith

    Mrs Smith New Member


    This was the first thing I noticed about my son at that age that stood out as being unusual. I couldn't put my finger on just what it was, but I knew there was something. The pediatrician brushed me off because my son has excellent eye contact and an advanced vocabulary (he remembered the name of the otoscope from the previous visit). A neurodev pediatrician diagnosis asperger's at 12yo.

    Like your son, mine's not bothered by noise except when he's trying to concentrate on school work. He's hypo-sensitive to proprioception but hyper-sensitive to light touch. His vestibular system is hyper-sensitive. His auditory system is both and visually he's mildly hyper-sensitive. The sensory problems can be over or under stimulated in all areas at different times. Stress, fatigue and hunger overload him and then every sensory system becomes overwhelmed. Then we get the meltdowns.

    Riding a bike took about 8 years to accomplish with lots of hands-on help but he did finally get it.

    Re: imaginative play - that's a misunderstood term. What they really mean is lack of symbolic play or imitative play. Does your child imitate the social activities of others? When he plays, does he imitate Dad washing the car or Mom doing the dishes? Repeating these behaviors is how kids learn the social norms. Typical kids pick up on these things without being taught, autistic kids don't. They definitely don't lack imagination. In fact they spend alot of time lost in their own thoughts because of the rich imagination they all seem to have in common. My son had some symbolic play but I probably initiated it.

    Try not to worry too much though. Whatever the roadblocks, you'll be able to help him get past. Good luck!
     
  10. frustrated440

    frustrated440 New Member

    Thanks for writing Mrs. Smith. So far I dont see much sensitivity to anything. He does get cranky if he is hungry or tired but that seems pretty typical for me because of his age. As far as touch or light goes he also doesn't seem bothered by either. I know how broad the spectrum is and have also worked with- a child with- asperger's. That child knew everything about Star Wars and I mean everything, lol. He also had the noise sensitivities and spoke very adult for his age but in a monotone. Whatever is going on with- my son seems so mild that everyone I have taken him says the "wait and see" thing. However he is starting regular speech and Occupational Therapist (OT) next week. The speech therapist thought he was very clear when he spoke. She did notice some repeating but he also had spontaneous speech as well. She said she wants to work with- me and show me some things that I can do with- him at home. The biggest concern is that and I guess his coping ability. He is a very loving little boy but at preschool when the teacher would ask something of him, he would just whine or cry. He very much just wants to play with- the kids and toys. I've only ever taken him to a play group before and I know that he has no concept of what school means. He doesn't understand why he sees a room full of toys and kids and why he can't just play the whole time. So with that said I dont know if it's a maturity thing because some kids just aren't ready at 3, or if it's more of a problem. I notice that when strangers have asked him what his name is or his age he would whine and kinda turn away from them. At home when I ask he will tell me but it's just like he doesn't like it when he feels something is expected from him or he's being tested in some way if that makes sense. So right now were at the point where we are trying to decide if he could go to the public school where I work as a special needs aide. It is 4 days a week so I definitely don't think he's ready for that. They said I could do 3 but I just don't know if he's ready. He loved going to the other place but it was the structure of it all that he had problems with. I know that he has to learn it and I want him to succeed in school but I also want to do it when he's ready. So that is kind of where we are at the moment. Today at work I will probably find out if we even qualify for him to go there. If we do I plan on talking to his teacher and laying it all out for her and hopefully she can help with- making the right decision for him. Part of me thinks maybe we should just stick with- the therapies first but I really want him to have that socialization of school. Anyways thanks for your reply and if anyone else has had these same issues, feel free to respond.
     
  11. Mrs Smith

    Mrs Smith New Member

    My son didn't start preschool until he was almost 5yo. That extra year at home made a big difference in his development so you'll see alot of progress especially with the added therapies. I'm not a big fan of ABA or discreet trial therapies so I think you're doing the right thing working with him yourself.

    I did want to mention the misconception re: speech/language deficits in High-Functioning Autism (HFA)/asperger's. The problem is pragmatics, not articulation. They usually have good vocabulary and general knowledge but they seem to be missing the more subtle nuances of language, the non-verbal kind. I found with my son that he was able to meet my expectations as long as he understood what was expected in the first place. Any misbehavior was always a cognitive misunderstanding, never a motivation problem. Once he knew what was expected, he always behaved appropriately. I wish the schools understood this. Punishments and rewards don't work because they don't clear up the comprehension problems. They really do speak a different language.
     
  12. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Jones here. Just kidding :wink:
    Have you ever seen children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified? Your son's language problem is more indicative of Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified than Aspergers Syndrome. Aspergers kids usually don't have speech problems. They may not converse right, but the delays are more often Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified or "atypical autism." These kids are friendlier and tend to have better eye contact than AS kids. My son's traits became way more apparent as he got older--at three we were told he wasn't on the spectrum, but he is. He was eleven before he got the obvious diagnosis that we had suspected all along. He saw a neuropsychologist and had twelve hours of intensive testing. I have to warn you that if there's even the chance that he's on the spectrum, and in my opinion I think that there is, I'd put the child in early interventions because that can make ALL the difference in the prognosis, and it certainly won't hurt him. My son had a hodge-podge of silly diagnosis. at three--speech disorder, cognitive delay not otherwise specified, Sensory Integration Disorder (SID), ADHD, ODD, etc. They got the symptoms right, but refused to name the disorder. There is an interesting online test for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). I also post on an excellent Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) board--many parents are "unsure" like you are. An online test can tell you if your child falls on the spectrum. It's not definitive, but those who post on the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) board feel it is very accurate if you are completely honest in your answers. It's often hard to be honest, but the test won't work if you're not. I will post it for you. Good luck!
    http://www.childbrain.com/pddassess.html
     
  13. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    Just reread your post. SHould also add my son had an obsessive interest in the videogame Mario Brothers and he still does. He can tell you everything about almost any video game that exists, but he is a teenager now. At three, I don't think we noticed anything unusual in the obsessive department. He didn't line things up or anything. He did like to watch light bulbs, but we didn't think that was unusual. When he got angry, he'd thro a terrible tantrum, but he has outgrown any disturbing behavior although he is still very "quirky."
     
  14. Mrs Smith

    Mrs Smith New Member

    MWM - I think you're probably right. I wasn't too concerned with the specific label as long as it was on the spectrum and he got the services. His best friends happen to be Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified kids.
     
  15. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    I suspectk it would be highly unusual for a child with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)'s to go much past their 3rd birthday without any obsessive behaviors or at least unusual interests. MM, wasn't yours Hyperlexic and showing letter interest by then?
     
  16. frustrated440

    frustrated440 New Member

    My son has alot of interest in letters and numbers but I don't know if it obsessive. He can recognize letters and numbers and likes to look at flashcards of them. I have a basket with- flashcards in it. Usually he just likes to make a mess out of them and they are all over the floor, so I try not to give them to him all the time. He has cars from the disney movie "Cars" and he will call them "my number 8 car" or "my number 3 car (even though its got the #43 on it, he calls it the number 3 car. But he likes all the cars in that movie and plays with them all but not obsessivly. Lately he hasnt even shown that much interest in them. Like I said with him, its really hard to tell. He doesnt seem to stick with- any one thing for that long but he definitely does like letters and numbers and recognizes them so what would you consider obsessive?
     
  17. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    I would call that unusually early interest in letter and numbers but it's not anywhere near obsessive. Kids with obsessive interest in letters and numbers LOVE them and talk about them ALL the time. They see them in about everything they see and do. For instance, most young kids with obsessive interest in letters or words can't walk by a car without stopping to read the lisence plate and will do things like when they're at the zoo look at the sign describing the animal and only afterwards look at the animal.

    Early interest in letters and numbers can simply be a sign of giftedness or it can be a sign that children are on their way to being Hyperlexic. There's no telling at the point where you are. For now, I'd still advise being observant and pursuing the speech and Occupational Therapist (OT).
     
  18. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    Again, though, my son learned his numbers and letters early and loved them and could read signs by rote. But he never talked about them. His obsessive behavior didn't show itself until he was older. So I'd still keep an eye out for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), especially atypical Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), like my son. He's fourteen now and very different from his peers--more so than he was at a young age. His interventions early on were a lifesafer, and he didn't have an Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) diagnosis. then either. The earlier these kids get specific help, the better they do. "Autistic traits" are Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)-not otherwise specified or being on the spectrum. I wouldn't take a chance and at least would try to get interventions...wait until later for a label...the label doesn't matter at such a young age. Take care :smile:
     
  19. frustrated440

    frustrated440 New Member

    Hello everyone. Well yesterday was my 3 year old's Occupational Therapist (OT)/ST session. They asked if I wanted to come in or watch a monitor in another room. I decided to watch the monitor because I think it's important for him to get used to time without me. It went really well. They transitioned him ALOT. They would do something for a couple of minutes and then they were on to something else. They gave him some choice time in between. He picked bubbles and they took turns blowing them. I've never worked with him on learning how to take turns and things, call me an idiot, but with him being my first I'm also kinda learning as I go. The appointment was scheduled for an hour and after 45 min. he wanted to leave the room and come find me and that is when he started to cry, but they did a really good job of calming him and helping him get his shoes on. Both therapists thought the session went REALLY well, thank God! I was really surprised that he was so compliant.

    I also will be starting him at a new preschool. He will be going to the public preschool at the elementary school where I work. I think he will do Occupational Therapist (OT)/ST on Wed. and school will be Thr. and Fri. I think that is the schedule I will start him out on. School is 3 hrs. each day and everyone else goes 4 days there, but I definitely think that is too much for him. I just want to get his feet wet right now and I will leave it up to the teachers to tell me if they think he can go more. I like that his therapists are working with him on structure, taking turns, and waiting/being patient. I think this will help him be successful at this preschool. Well I have my fingers crossed, but he was a very good boy yesterday. Not that I really have huge issues with his behavior but he needs to learn about structure and sitting still, that sort of thing. So I'm keeping my fingers crossed and praying that I am doing the right thing for him and not putting too much on him or asking too much from him.
     
  20. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    Very good! I'm always amazed when watching skilled therapists who are well suited to the age group.

    It's a good idea to observe the sessions, either being in or watching on the monitor as you did yesterday. Occupational Therapist (OT) and ST will be so much more successful when parent is involved on the homefront. Learn the ropes and you'll be able to supplement at home in both areas.
     
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