Autism Might Slow Brain's Ability to Integrate Input From Multiple Senses

Discussion in 'Parenting News' started by runawaybunny, Aug 24, 2010.

  1. runawaybunny

    runawaybunny Guest

    Autism Might Slow Brain's Ability to Integrate Input From Multiple Senses - Scientific American

    Children with autism often focus intently on a single activity or feature of their environment. New research might help to explain this behavioral trend, providing evidence that the brains of young people with autism are slower to integrate input coming from more than one sense at the same time.

    During study of the disorder decades ago, research into these basic tendencies was common. But in subsequent years, scientists have tended to focus more on complex issues, ranging from communication troubles to underlying genetic patterns.

    Recently, however, more studies have set their sights back on some of the simple processes that most people take for granted, such as sensory intake, as a way to better understand more high-level manifestations, such as social interaction issues. "We believe that these things interact in very significant ways," says Sophie Molholm, an associate professor of neuroscience at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and co-author of a new study about multi-sensory processing.
     
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