how do you get difficult child hospitalized?

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by elisem, Aug 19, 2007.

  1. elisem

    elisem New Member

    We have our first appointment with a psychiatrist at the end of September, but 7 y.o. difficult child needs help NOW!!! He has become incredibly violent, has almost caused a car accident (hurting driver--me--while driving) kicking, punching, screaming.... Just now he managed to be quiet in church, but when I looked over at him, he was masturbating in the pew!!!! I tapped his arm to get him to stop and he just laughed. Then when Dad told him he couldn't have a cookie after church because of this, he started screaming, kicking, punching... had to be dragged to the car with his arms held behind him, then punched dad (who was driving) and his 3 yo brother all the way home. (easy child, by the way, was just saying, "I love you and I'm going to take care of you," to him--how sweet is that? he really does love the difficult child, even if he gets punched a lot by him). Right now difficult child and dad are upstairs, dad putting a full body hold on difficult child, difficult child still trying to hurt dad.

    I'm ready to have him committed--it's only our superior size that has so far prevented us from getting seriously hurt--he wants to hurt us, and he's giving it all he's got.

    What do we do?

    C
     
  2. nvts

    nvts Active Member

    Take him to the emergency room and have him evaluated. If he poses a threat to himself or others, they'll put a hold on him.

    Sorry you're going through this, but the earlier the intervention, the sooner you can find out what's going on with him.

    God Bless and let us know how things go!

    Beth
     
  3. Steely

    Steely Active Member

    You simply scoop him up, like you did at church and drive him to your local emergency room. Now!
    It is very easy, and straight forward, and the people there know exactly how to handle things and what to do.
    But do not wait another minute!!!!!!!!! The ER needs to see him in action so that they have grounds for admittance. If by some miracle he has calmed down by the time you get to the ER than explain to them what happened in the car. That is immediate grounds for admittance since he was being a danger to others.

    Good luck, and let us know how it is goes.
     
  4. Sara PA

    Sara PA New Member

    IIRC, you child isn't taking any medications, right? You may be describing bipolar disorder -- mood shifts, hypersexuality, etc. I suggest you read the newsletters on The Bipolar Child website. Education yourself may prevent years of trials of the wrong medications which might make your child worse, not better.
     
  5. witzend

    witzend Well-Known Member

    I would also take him to the ER, under the circumstances. Make sure that they understand that your concerns are the violence - especially in the car. They hypersexuality is quite concerning, as well, and a very big red flag. But it isn't immediately or even imminently dangerous. At least, not to your average ER employee. It might be helpful for you and for them to make a list of his violent and dangerous behaviors for when you talk to them.

    Can you talk to his Pediatrician in advance and tell him that you are going? This might be helpful, too.

    I would never presume to make a diagnosis as to what may be causing this. It could be anything from a situational depression to a food allergy to bi-polar, and anything in between. The first thing is to get the dangerous behaviors to stop. Then there is a the longer haul of figuring out what was causing them and keeping them from coming back. It could be from diet, therapy, medications, or any combination of the above.

    PS~

    When the subject of losing a priviledge from what happened in church comes up, be sure that they understand it was a matter of because he refused to stop when you told him, not because of what he was doing.
     
  6. On_Call

    On_Call New Member

    I am just seeing this post. I hope that you did just as everyone suggested. Scoop difficult child and take him to the ER.
     
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