Question for the WISC-IV "savvy"

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by TeDo, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    Here are the scores from the WISC-IV they did on difficult child 1. Can anyone tell me what they mean and what the numbers are supposed to tell me?

    VCI: 93
    PRI: 119
    WMI: 88
    PSI: 103
    FSIQ: 102 (I know this is full scale IQ)


    On the Woodcock Johnson Tests of Achievement-Third Edition he scored 84 in broad math, 93 in broad reading and 89 in written language.
     
  2. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Just "happen" to have a full report handy...

    VCI = verbal comprehension index
    PRI = perceptual reasoning index
    WMI = working memory index
    PSI = processing speed index

    I don't know where the numbers rate as compared to percentiles, but it looks like those scores show VCI and WMI as weaker and PRI and PSI as stronger.

    Perceptual reasoning is definitely his strong point. But nothing seems too frr off the map to me - things to work on, things to accommodate,...

    Does the report not include an interpretation?
     
  3. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    It rolls ALL the testing they AND the school did (12 in all) into ONE overall interpretation, which is totally right on. I just know people here have mentioned discrepancies or differences in certain scores are an indication of something but I have never had actual data to look at to know what they're talking about.

    Thanks for telling me what the abbreviations mean. Now I just want to know how those scores "measure up".
     
  4. buddy

    buddy New Member

    The WISC-IV is divided into fifteen subtests, ten of which formed part of the previous WISC III. The five new subtests include three core tests: Picture Concepts, Letter-Number Sequencing, Matrix Reasoning and two supplemental tests: Cancellation and Word Reasoning. The supplemental subtests are used to accommodate children in certain rare cases, or to make up for spoiled results which may occur from interruptions or other circumstances. Testers are allowed no more than two substitutions in any FSIQ test, or no more than one per index. A total of five composite scores can be derived with the WISC–IV. The WISC-IV generates a Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) which represents overall cognitive ability, the four other composite scores are Verbal Comprehension index (VCI), Perceptual Reasoning Index (PRI), Processing Speed Index (PSI) and Working Memory Index (WMI).
    Each of the ten core subtests is given equal weighting towards full scale IQ. There are three subtests for both VCI and PRI, thus they are given 30% weighting each; in addition, PSI and WMI are given weighting for their two subtests each. The WISC-IV also produces seven process scores on three subtests: block design, cancellation and digit span. These scores are intended to provide more detailed information on cognitive abilities that contribute to performance on the subtest. These scores do not contribute to the composite scores.
    The VCI's subtests are as follows:
    • Vocabulary - examinee is asked to define a provided word.
    • Similarities - asking how two words are alike/similar.
    • Comprehension - questions about social situations or common concepts.
    • Information (supplemental) - general knowledge questions.
    • Word reasoning (supplemental)- a task involving clues that lead to a specific word, each clue adds more information about the object/word/concept.
    The Verbal Comprehension Index is an overall measure of verbal concept formation (the child's ability to verbally reason) and is influenced by knowledge learned from the environment.
    The PRI's subtests are as follows:
    • Block Design - children put together red-and-white blocks in a pattern according to a displayed model. This is timed, and some of the more difficult puzzles award bonuses for speed.
    • Picture Concepts - children are provided with a series of pictures presented in rows (either two or three rows) and asked to determine which pictures go together, one from each row.
    • Matrix Reasoning - children are shown an array of pictures with one missing square, and select the picture that fits the array from five options.
    • Picture Completion (supplemental) - children are shown artwork of common objects with a missing part, and asked to identify the missing part by pointing and/or naming.
    The WMI's (formerly known as Freedom from Distractibility Index) subtests are as follows:
    • Digit Span - children are orally given sequences of numbers and asked to repeat them, either as heard and in reverse order.
    • Letter-Number Sequencing - children are provided a series of numbers and letters and asked to provide them back to the examiner in a predetermined order.
    • Arithmetic (supplemental) - orally administered arithmetic questions. Timed.
    The PSI's subtests are as follows:
    • Coding - children under 8 mark rows of shapes with different lines according to a code, children over 8 transcribe a digit-symbol code. The task is time-limited with bonuses for speed.
    • Symbol Search - children are given rows of symbols and target symbols, and asked to mark whether or not the target symbols appear in each row.
    • Cancellation (supplemental)- children scan random and structured arrangements of pictures and marks specific target pictures within a limited amount of time.
     
  5. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Does the report specifically mention "working memory" as something to be addressed?
     
  6. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    It gives many recommendations for accommodations mostly in school since that is where it is a HUGE issue. Since we are currently doing online school at home, I am teaching him to use resources instead of relying just on his memory for most things.
     
  7. buddy

    buddy New Member

    TESTING TERMS

    68 percent of standard scores fall between 85-115 (+/- 1 Standard Deviation from the average of 100) Most scores are not considered concerning unless below 1.5 school district or 2 school district from the mean... BUT a significant difference between full scale scores and a subtest or from performance scores versus verbal scores can show learning challenges.... or suggest/lend support to some diagnosis.


    you have to ask a psychiatric or other wisc trained person but I would think that his relatively lower subtest score (which is still with-in a very good range) could reflect an anxiety to timed/pressured testing, could reflect an issue with short term memory for those kinds of tasks (saying numbers backward.. I am terrible with that stuff) etc. I would not be too worried unless someone tells you that it is really an Learning Disability (LD)....supported by other testing.... but for now it can mean that a STYLE of learning for him that would be challenging would be things that require those kinds of tasks.

    I am so not a huge fan of IQ testing in general but to show that he falls in a normal IQ range is a nice relief.
     
  8. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    Thanks for the info Buddy. I should have known you'd have the information handy (or at least know where to look). LOL
     
  9. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Found what I was looking for.
    Scores of 90-110 are considered "average".
    Therefore... PRI is a strength, and working memory is a weakness - but 88 isn't THAT low... where's ways to help - Accommodations and Interventions.
     
  10. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    So the PRI basically means that he's a very perceptive visual learner?!? THAT would be sooooo true.
     
  11. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    Buddy, what if you don't have the subtest scores to compare?
     
  12. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Sounds like this score, and your observations and experience, jive!
    Isn't it nice to get validation?
     
  13. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    Insane, his ENTIRE report is validation! He is AWESOME and he words things perfectly (re: simply language for school personnel).
     
  14. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    I have found, in general, that if you get even an 80% match with "mommy gut", you've got a working report. We've had some "parenting stuff" thrown in on a few... but the basics were sound, and the testing was solid, and we went with what we had.
     
  15. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    We're about 95%. Some of his recommendations are things that we've already tried and our Occupational Therapist (OT) explained why they bombed. Otherwise, he was right in line with my mommy gut. Why can't school personnel (and some other professionals) trust our mommy guts? I have a mommy gut AND a college degee in a related field. It's beyond frustrating!!!
     
  16. buddy

    buddy New Member

    well the index scores are groups of subtests... (versus the FSIQ) so you kind of have subtest scores for general areas...does that make sense? then if that is supported by other tests that look at for example... the working memory stuff like in language testing you can see if there really is a pattern of that being an issue.
     
  17. InsaneCdn

    InsaneCdn Well-Known Member

    Just my theory, but...
    Not all mommies are like us.
    Warrior Moms have been in the trenches of guerrilla warefare for a LONG time.
    We're savvy, we know our "opponents" well.
    Our "mommy gut" is very finely tuned.

    Your average mommy - with an average typical teen, for example - may think that school is causing poor little Johnny so many problems, when what Johnny really needs is a kick in the seat of the pants. Know what I mean?? So, school gets used to NOT listening to parents, because for many of the cases, school's take on things is at least as good as the parents' take.

    If they could only learn to recognize the Warrior Moms... and then trust THOSE "mommy guts"... ???
     
  18. buddy

    buddy New Member

    Pretty common for a large group of people with autism.... Used to be thought to be suggestive in autism but now we know there are many people with autism who do rely on auditory learning.
     
  19. TeDo

    TeDo Guest

    Thanks for the help both of you. I feel a little less confused now. Maybe I can sleep without numbers wandering in and out of my dreams. LOL
     
  20. buddy

    buddy New Member

    oooo scary number dreams.... yeah, better to avoid those
     
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