So, how does this happen?

Discussion in 'The Watercooler' started by witzend, Dec 13, 2007.

  1. witzend

    witzend Well-Known Member

    I got a letter in the mail today from our Credit Union. We are in Oregon. It said that my debit card (I never use it online by the way) had been compromised and I needed to cancel it, and it would take 7 - 10 business days to replace. Great! 7 - 10 business days and it's 7 business days before Christmas!

    :grrr:

    husband works right upstairs from the branch office, so off he goes. It seems that they were notified by the Secret Service that the SS had found a breach in security on a computer in Pittsburgh and my debit card info was on it. How did that happen? The Secret Service?

    :surprise:

    I get to keep my card and watch it like a hawk, and it will be good until the new one comes. So, I guess I get to watch my mailbox like a hawk, too! They didn't say "If something happens and you report it you won't be responsible", but I had better not be!

    Needless to say, I will be online checking my account a few times a day! husband gets his annual bonus on Monday and I'll be darned if some little scumbag is going to take that from us!
     
  2. Lothlorien

    Lothlorien Active Member Staff Member

    We don't have debit cards. The banks charge a yearly fee for them and I refuse to pay it.

    Anyway, I haven't a clue what happened, but thought I'd add a story....

    I got a letter from some company that was hired by my bank that apparently many of the checking account information had been compromised. Apparently, my checking account number was in the mess. Nothing came of it, but the letter was to notify me to keep an eye out on my account. We've not seen any strange activity, fortunately. I don't keep much in that account anyway.
     
  3. Star*

    Star* call 911........call 911

    Secret Service? :smile:

    Sounds very James Bondish to me.
     
  4. flutterbee

    flutterbee Guest

    The Secret Service is involved anytime something like this might be linked to terrorist activity. I *think* there is a dollar number that has to be hit or compromised before the SS gets involved.

    We had a client who had $50,000 worth of illegal checks written on their account. The person(s) had printed up checks, made them out for innocuous amounts ($200-$300 each), forged them and deposited them into their own account drawn on our client's account. The Secret Service got involved.

    How frustrating this time of year. Good thing you get to keep and use your card...but do watch your mailbox.
     
  5. Marguerite

    Marguerite Active Member

    Sometimes these things happen as incidental to another investigation. For example, you might buy a pair of shoes from a particular store, which also has an online shop. Maybe the card numbers of cards used in face-to-face purchases go onto the same computer which is used to store information about online purchases. And maybe they were following a money trail that happened to take them past this shoe store (a crim may have bought a pair of shoes online with a stolen card) and found your details also on the same computer. That doesn't mean the crim had access to your card details; but it indicates that possibly they could have. The store may be totally innocent, just permeable.

    Or your details MAY have been accessed, but maybe SS found your card details along with several million others; and the crims, if they were working through those details at all, may only have got to the first few hundred before the unusual activity tipped off the banks.

    Watch your account carefully, hope for the best and look forward to getting your new card.

    Marg
     
  6. hearts and roses

    hearts and roses Mind Reader

    :smile: oh my!

    Remember: CASH IS KING! ::money::
     
  7. HereWeGoAgain

    HereWeGoAgain Grandpa

    Actually the Secret Service is involved because they are the government agency charged with investigating financial crimes:

    (from the US Secret Service website)
    Quote: MISSION STATEMENT

    The United States Secret Service is mandated by statute and executive order to carry out two significant missions: protection and criminal investigations. The Secret Service protects the president and vice president, their families, heads of state, and other designated individuals; investigates threats against these protectees; protects the White House, vice president’s residence, foreign missions, and other buildings within Washington, D.C.; and plans and implements security designs for designated National Special Security Events. The Secret Service also investigates violations of laws relating to counterfeiting of obligations and securities of the United States; financial crimes that include, but are not limited to, access device fraud, financial institution fraud, identity theft, computer fraud; and computer-based attacks on our nation’s financial, banking, and telecommunications infrastructure. (emphasis added)
     
  8. Hound dog

    Hound dog Nana's are Beautiful

    :smile:

    I so love cash.
     
  9. LynnG61

    LynnG61 New Member

    seems like in the days of modern technology, the IT departments that handle the security side of their businesses could have a better handle on their security.

    The Department of Health and Welfare, PA contact me recently saying that my sons social security number could be compromised because their medical benefits records were hacked in to.

    This is the state sending me snail mail telling me this. Oh boy.

    Sorry to hear this happened to you, it seems more and more these days these things are occurring. Whatever happened to the old days of filing drawers :smile: Seems it was much safer!
     
  10. Big Bad Kitty

    Big Bad Kitty lolcat

    I am so sorry. I hope this gets taken care of quickly.

    And I have no idea how this happens.
     
  11. skeeter

    skeeter New Member

    Our credit card number had "suspect activity" and they froze it a couple of years ago. The main computer for the bank was hacked, and thousands of credit card numbers were "stolen". The hackers were using a different card number every once in a while for several years.
    So it's really nothing that you have done or purchased - it could simply be hackers getting into the bank's computer mainframe.

    Ohio had a "thumb drive" stolen this spring that had many, many people's information on it, including SSN, etc.

    There is really NO way to protect yourself against this kind of thing. Unfortunately, between health insurance, employment, taxes, banks, and on and on, our information is spread everywhere. While you would hope it would be safe, it's really not. You just have to keep an eye on all your accounts for suspicious activity.
     
  12. HereWeGoAgain

    HereWeGoAgain Grandpa

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Washington, D.C.
    December 14, 2007

    Dear Hapless Peon,

    We regret to inform you that all of you and your extended family's personal information, including Social Security numbers, bank account information, credit card accounts, Personal Identification Numbers (PINs), computer passwords, scrapbooks, secret code words, garage door opener codes, closet skeletons, and detailed information on embarrassing personal indiscretions dating back to your great-great-grandparent's generation may have been inadvertently compromised when our main central composite database, "Big Brother", was hacked by criminal elements including the Mafia, the Yakuza, Master Telemarketing Inc., and 16 distinct spam-bot networks. It is believed that system security was compromised when one of our employees accidentally divulged the secret master password, "PASSWORD123", to a man who approached the employee on the street and asked, "Suppose I wanted to hack into the main database, how, exactly, would I go about that? Oh by the way, I'm not a criminal or anything." The employee, thus misled, had no reason to be suspicious and answered, "Oh, that's easy. Just use the secret master password. Everybody knows it: it's PASSWORD123. Not case sensitive. That was the default when the system was installed and we haven't gotten around to changing it yet, but it is scheduled for early 2012, so anybody who wants to hack in had better do it before then. Don't tell any criminals."

    While we believe that the secret master password, "PASSWORD123", has not been divulged to any other unauthorized personnel, the possibility exists that the information obtained by the mystery man may be put to use for non-legitimate purposes, such as robbing you blind. Therefore we suggest that you watch your accounts closely, and in the event that you are robbed blind, write down "I was robbed blind" on an 8 1/2 X 11 sheet of unlined white paper, with a list of all personal information including Social Security numbers, bank account information, credit card accounts, Personal Identification Numbers (PINs), computer passwords, scrapbooks, secret code words, garage door opener codes, closet skeletons, and detailed information on embarrassing personal indiscretions dating back to your great-great-grandparents generation, and mail to us via US Postal Service ("snail mail"). We will file this information in a large metal filing cabinet. After you have filed proper notification of having been robbed blind per the preceding instructions, your total liability under the law for fraudulent activity using your information will be limited to your entire earnings and your children's earnings to the seventh generation. Should you fail to properly notify us as above, you will of course be liable for all fraudulent activity conducted under your name with no limit on said liability, no matter how many millions, billions, or trillions it may be. Sorry about that. :censored2: to be you, dude.

    Rest assured that this agency is doing everything possible to protect and maintain your information. Besides changing the secret master password, "PASSWORD123", to something else, like, oh, I don't know, my wife's initials and birthday (which would be "DLC1012"), we are increasing physical security as well. All persons entering our facility will be asked to "pinky-swear" that they are not going to do anything "naughty". These new stringent security measures will be implemented on an aggressive schedule, beginning no later than March 15, 2010.

    Again, our apologies for the mix-up, and we really really hope you don't get robbed blind. Well, we don't actually care, but we have to make it sound like we do.

    Sincerely,

    United States Large Impersonal Government Agency (USLIGA)
    </div></div>
     
  13. witzend

    witzend Well-Known Member

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Dear Hapless Peon,

    We regret to inform you that all of you and your extended family's personal information, including Social Security numbers, bank account information, credit card accounts, Personal Identification Numbers (PINs), computer passwords, scrapbooks, secret code words, garage door opener codes, closet skeletons, and detailed information on embarrassing personal indiscretions dating back to your great-great-grandparent's generation may have been inadvertently compromised...</div></div>

    :rofl:

    If only it weren't so close to the truth!
     
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