I feel like I've been run over by a truck

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by flutterbee, Feb 22, 2007.

  1. flutterbee

    flutterbee Guest

    One minute difficult child is fine. Smiling. Chatting. And less than a minute later she's enraged about I have no idea what but is just finding things to be angry about then next thing you know it's screaming and stomping. Sigh....

    It happens every single day. I honestly don't know why it surprises me. But it always does. I think it's the intensity of the rage and the speed of the transformation. Just seems to hit out of left field. No known trigger. I am always left thinking, "What the he$$ just happened???"

    We are trying hard for day treatment. I don't know what else to do.
     
  2. smallworld

    smallworld Moderator

    Sorry you're struggling with difficult child's unpredictability. Is she on any medications? If so, is there any chance they're making things worse? Just a thought . . .
     
  3. LittleDudesMom

    LittleDudesMom Well-Known Member Staff Member

    Obviously you are looking for some help. I hope it comes soon!

    I've always said my difficult child is like a water faucet without the warm setting - he goes from cold to hot with no inbetween!

    Hugs,
    Sharon
     
  4. Janna

    Janna New Member

    I know, Wynters, it's exhausting. And never knowing what to expect when it so frustrating. Dylan is the same way (although minus the rages now, but he used to have them awful).

    Now, instead of raging, he kinda goes flat when he doesn't want to deal with something. In a way, it's actually comical (you have to know Dylan and see what he does), but at the same time very frustrating. Won't talk. Will just stand there and look at you with this "I'm going to win" face, but he never wins. I don't see it at home at all anymore, but they still see it at times in school. It is usually when there's something coming up he has to do (i.e. gym or music) that he doesn't want to.

    But he's just so happy-go-lucky right up until that last second. Then wham. The flat stuff used to be the raging and whoa.

    I have no advice, really - just wanted you to know someone else has been there done that, too. It's rotten. I was wondering about medications, too - is difficult child on anything?

    We did a day treatment. It was okay. I didn't care for the psychiatrist, which made it just okay, nothing great, and we didn't get anything out of it. But, at least I didn't get calls from the school for a while lol.

    Hang in,

    Janna
     
  5. Wiped Out

    Wiped Out Well-Known Member Staff Member

    Hugs to you-I know how hard that unpredictability is-my difficult child is the same way. I hope you get the day treatment program soon.
     
  6. timer lady

    timer lady Queen of Hearts

    I'm sorry that Wynter is so very unstable & labile right now. I've been blindsided by rages & meltdowns.

    I could never pin down the trigger - heck, in my mind that would be half the battle. Knowing the trigger.

    Keeping you & your difficult child in my thoughts today. Praying for a quick placement in a day treatment setting.

    Word of warning, having been through day treatment placements 3 times with kt & twice with wm - be prepared to wait. Sometimes there can be a waiting list (especially this time of year).

    Prepare for the worst, hope for the best!

    Take some deep breaths, a long bath or shower. You can survive anything if the goal line is in sight!
     
  7. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    If neuropsychologist is thinking of The Spectrum, conventional therapy and medications alone won't do it. Have you gotten any Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) interventions? Read anything on it? A NonVerbal Learning Disorder (NVLD) is a tricky diagnosis. Some feel it's the same exact thing as Aspergers. Some don't. At any rate, they are enough alike to merit similar interventions. With the NonVerbal Learning Disorder (NVLD) and Sensory Integration Disorder (SID), I'd at least consider adding Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) interventions to his treatment. NonVerbal Learning Disorder (NVLD)/Sensory Integration Disorder (SID)/AS are NOT psychiatric issues and kids who have them do NOT rage because of psychiatric issues, unless there is a co-morbid diagnosis. If so, both disorders need treatment. I know how confusing these diagnoses are. You hope to go in there and get a professional with a concrete label, but your neuropsychologist was honest enough to give kind of say he wasn't sure. Still, I believe in being proactive and I'd treat Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) anyways, since it's a possibility and the symptoms are there. Neurological and psychiatric issues are closely tied together. Hug to you. I hope you get it figured out. I do think medications may be one part of the answer here. The daily raging isn't good for you or your child.

    Janna--That shutting down could be the Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD). Many Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) kids just turn off when faced with too much stimulation. It's not really a manipulation--it's more of a coping mechanism! :smile:
     
  8. Loris

    Loris New Member

    I know how hard it is to handle the unpredictibility of their moods. It's very frustrating, at best. I agree that there is usually a wait for day treatment, though. I hope it gets easier for you, soon.
     
  9. givnmegryhr

    givnmegryhr New Member

    Is't it the truth? The psychiatrist's always ask what triggers him? Well, if we only knew , we might be able to head off alot of this s*(&!
    The thing is with this illness, they don't even know. It just happens. It's like the waves, sometimes one comes out of nowhere and hits you when you don't expect it. The medications do help. There is no magic pill ,but the right mix will make it easier. It's just hard to find the right one. We are still looking. Hugs.
     
  10. JJJ

    JJJ Active Member

    Does she hear voices? Kanga used to explode out of nowhere. She never admitted to hearing voices when asked if she did, but one day I asked her "what did the voices just say?" and she told me. Geodon has really helped quiet the voices.
     
  11. flutterbee

    flutterbee Guest

    Wynter has been prescribed lexapro 10 mg and it does help (some). However, she is currently non-compliant with medications. Refuses to take them. I've done the whole non-negotiable thing. She'd rather lose every priveledge she has then take them. She says they don't do anything. I take that back. She screams it. It has everything to do with her feeling like she has no control...over anything. I've explained that she doesn't have any control over her emotions and that the medications may very well help with that and actually give her some control. That's the whole idea behind them. I've suggested she keep a diary of her feelings everyday. Then start taking the medications and continue with the diary. After 2 months she could look back and see if there was any difference in her feelings before and after medications.

    She doesn't rage at school. At school she shuts down. I spoke with the Intervention Specialist on Tuesday (I think) and she said they were working on a math review sheet and Wynter was just sitting there staring at it blankly. When prompted, she started to work on it, but she had to be prompted a lot because she would just shut down again. She does shut down at home every once in a while. But usually it's rages and meltdowns. Sometimes both. And I never know what's going to set them off.

    Linda, I agree - finding the trigger is half the battle. I have no clue 95% of the time.

    Sharon - that's what I've always said that about my difficult child, too. Hot or cold. Love or hate. No in between.

    She doesn't seem to fit any diagnosis. She seems to have various pieces and parts of them, but it's been a struggle to define.

    When I was telling her therapist about meetings with the school and how I was trying to educate them on Wynter's issues, I made a comment to the effect of so it's easier for the next parent with a child like Wynter as well. She said that the school district probably wouldn't see many like Wynter.
     
  12. Sara PA

    Sara PA New Member

    When did she start refusing to take the Lexapro? And how long had she been taking it before she stopped?
     
  13. flutterbee

    flutterbee Guest

    Sara,

    She didn't want to take them to begin with, but I was able to get her to take them initially.

    psychiatrist started her out at 5mg. I got her a pill cutter (cause the smallest dose is 10mg) and she would cut her pill every night and take it. We saw small results with the anxiety almost immediately. After 6 weeks, psychiatrist increased to 10 mg. She did that for about 2 weeks and then that's when she really started to refuse...she had gone to my grandmothers for the weekend and forgotten to take them for 3 days. She's been refusing ever since. That was September, I think.

    I was able to get her to take them again in January for a month. Nothing for about 2 weeks now.
     
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