I had a bad day again

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by Mariah, Jul 3, 2010.

  1. Mariah

    Mariah Guest

    my son michael doesnt have the diganosis of ODD but does have ADHD. I myself have ADD, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), depression, and anxiety disorder. fun huh? OK im new here, but sought out a forum for support and help.

    I am pretty sure michael (4.5yrs.) has autism spectrum disorder of some sort. http://www.medpagetoday.com/Meeting...medium=email&utm_campaign=Meeting_Roundup_PAS
    explains why. you dont have to read it, but in my opinion I feel that it is the only thing which explains why he wont eat. . . him and his brother both dont. they have infintile anorexia. we see about 5-6 different doctors, and none can tell us ANYTHING!!!!

    i am so frustrated!! I dont know what doctor to go to. i know that my kids have something wrong. i just dont know how to prove it. dont even know whats wrong. I know a lot of you on here probably feel the same way.

    I think DS michael does have ODD. He is so young but puts me over the edge so often. talk about anxiety disorder. man, he has so much anger, and it gives me anxiety attacks like crazy!!

    he just doesnt learn from his mistakes! he does not CARE about anyone but himself! he never is sorry for what he does, and has no remourse for his bad behavior!! he puts us all thorugh so much. i dont know what to do anymore.

    help:sad-very:
     
  2. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    I would take them both to a neuropsychologist. They are great at diagnosing, test extensively, and give better feedback in my opinion than anyone else. Until then, since you are aware that they are different, maybe you should change your expectations to EXPECT them to be different.
    You need to call ASAP as NeuroPsychs can have long waiting lists, but are worth the wait. You can find NeuroPsychs at university and children's hospitals.
    It is common for autistic spectrum kids to SEEM self-centered because they can't relate well to others. They need help with that. You cant' do it. Usually they get the help in school.
    Did either c hild have speech delays? Do they have trouble making eye contact? Can they relate to their same age peers? Do they have any quirks of obsessive interests? Do they copy things they hear on television, almost verbatim? Any early reading? Lots of anxiety over stopping one activity and starting a new one? Sensitive about clothing textures, food textures, loud noises?
    Is there a father in the picture?
     
  3. WearyWoman

    WearyWoman Guest

    Hi Mariah,

    Glad you found this place, but so sorry to hear about your bad day. Although I'm a newbie, I'm an "old" newbie, so to speak. I returned here recently after years away, since our younger difficult child now is having behavior issues.

    I read your post, and I can so relate to the feelings of being overwhelmed, as well as the anxiety in raising a child with special challenges. Our difficult child (now 9), was not diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder until he was 6 1/2 years old. Prior to that, we had him evaluated at a children's hospital for a full neurodevelopmental assessment. They concluded he had severe ADHD and apraxia of speech. This happened when he was 3 years old. They did not think he had autism at that time. As time passed, though, his odd behaviors and social skills deficits (and sensory issues) really became more apparent. We had him evaluated by an autism specialist at age 6, and it was concluded that he has a mild form of autism that doesn't really fit into the box of any specific autism category. His official diagnosis is pervasive development disorder not otherwise specified (Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) - not otherwise specified). The school system performed its own evaluation and came to the same conclusion. He is presently receiving intensive in-home therapy. Though his autism symptoms are mild by definition, they have significantly impacted our life, and I have no doubt whatsoever that his diagnosis is correct. All of the pieces finally fit together - the inflexibility, low frustration tolerance for change or instructions, sensory sensitivities, speech problems, hyper-focus on certain topics of interest, ongoing monologues, social skills and relationship issues, etc. The list goes on. Because his disruptive behaviors were the most difficult thing to deal with initially, those were the focus - ADHD and ODD-like symptoms. But, behind all of that was a form of autism. It's like a complicated puzzle of layers.

    The reason I'm sharing this with you is to encourage you to have your son evaluated by a multi-disciplinary team, including an autism specialist, if you haven't already. If your son is on the autism spectrum, the sooner you know for sure and are able to pursue resources for assistance, the better. Of course, the same is true for other disorders as well. Having this done will help with his education, pediatric care, and family support. As I said, our son's ODD-type behavior is really a manifestation of his autism spectrum issues, and in many cases, our improper response to his needs. We have learned that what works with typical kids is not working with him. Autism spectrum kids can become very agitated, frustrated, and aggressive when they are overwhelmed or when too many demands are placed on them. Check out my other recent post here about this with our son.

    I know it's extremely hard right now for you. I remember how difficult the pre-diagnosis years were for us too. It will get better. Don't give up. Others will be along soon to share some resources to help get you started. Just wanted to post and let you know I care.

    (((hugs)))

    WearyWoman
     
  4. Mariah

    Mariah Guest

    well colby our 18 month old i think has the same problem. but he doesnt say much yet. still wont say mama or dada. still wont call his brother anything. he learns a word about one at a time, and then forgets it later. right now the extent of his speach is babble or the words hot and "duck" for stuck. that is ALL!! but michael i believe talked at a normal age. he is the 4.5 yr old. he is about 1-2 yrs ahead in his reading and numbers and writing than most kids says the developmental pediatrician. who said that he doesnt have autism but has some symptoms. he also has sensory integration(?) dissability. colby hits himself when he gets upset. and he wont stop until i notice he is doing it and then calms down. michael and colby both like to bang their heads for fun occasionally. no michael doesnt ever quote movies verbatem. much anxiety over any change of activity for colby, and michael some as well. michael used to be really active, but now he is up or down.... as in really active, or wont get up to do anything but sit on the couch (mostly wanting or watching the TV.) no trouble making eye contact for either, but michael has touble a lot of time being able to make friends. its getting better, but he and colby both just know how to play by themselfs really. and yeah there is a dad. weve been married for almost 5 years. happily married.

    thank you for your help. i will definatly look into this.
     
  5. Mariah

    Mariah Guest

    thank you for that. i have so been feeling like my life is just in ruins because of this. nobody understands. everybody tells me i am just overreacting and being paranoid and that all kids are this way. of course they all tell me that kids will eat when they are hungry too, but now that he is diagnosed with infantile anorexia, i can at least prove that to them. but yes i suppose it is like a puzzle. and i though doctors were supposed to have the degree, but it seems that i am the one doing all the research and studying here!! geez!!! i have to teach the doctors somtimes too!!! oh my GOSH!!!!

    i love that there is a such thing as an in-home therapy available. i wonder if michael can have that. i want a multi-disciplinary team!! it sounds just like what i have been looking for!! i keep telling my husband, who works over 40-60 hours a week sometimes on night shift and sleeps during the day (we only get about 2 days with him totall amount of all time added together that he is home, awake, and able to be talked to. too much away time for a 22 year old mom of a child like this with no help!!) i keep telling him that i feel so alone and helpless. like i am not able to physically or emotionally handle this all by myself. i cant even handle my own ADD much less a 4 year olds adHd!! and then whatever else is wrong with him.... wow. i have actually asked his doctor if i could have in home care with his eating disablility, but he never seems to meet the criteria for it. and i have called nanny places and asked if they can help me discipline him, but they dont really do that. and they wouldnt "get" him anyways. its not the same with him. normal pareting doesnt WORK with him for some odd reason.

    thank you THANK YOU both of you that posted!! this is more help than I expected!
    I literally started crying when i read both of these posts... i dont know if it was me being overwhelmed or sad, or happy about the advice.... mabey everything.

    thank you both!!
     
  6. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    I'll 2nd (and 3rd) that!
    I suspect the eating issue may be related to a sensory integration disorder, which often goes along with-Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD). Does your son like ANYTHING? If he likes hamburgers, for example, then give him as many as he wants, and then one night let him watch you make sloppy Joes (similar to hamburger) or noodle-beef casserole, etc. If it's cereal he likes, then add a diff brand once in a while.
    His anger is stemming from major league frustration. Watch him carefully when he begins to become agitated. Eventually you'll be able to predict it and often, avoid a total meltdown.
     
  7. WearyWoman

    WearyWoman Guest

    Mariah, our son used to hit himself when he was upset too - still does from time to time. You are right to ask questions, and if your intuition tells you that something isn't right, listen to it. We took our son to the pediatrician when he was 2 1/2, because he wasn't talking yet, and we were told to wait another year - that he could just be developing more slowly. Well, in hindsight, we missed out on a whole year of early childhood therapy because of that. If your older son doesn't meet the full criteria for autism, he may still be on the spectrum with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) - not otherwise specified. Our son doesn't meet the full criteria for Aspergers, autism, or childhood disintegrative disorder, but he has clusters of symptoms in different areas related to autism.

    Here are some more things to think about:
    • Do you ever feel like you can't connect emotionally with your child? Does it seem like he is somewhat detached?
    • Does your child have difficulty with transitions or changes in routines?
    • Do you notice your child has preferencs and aversions to textures and scents of food, clothing, etc.?
    • Does your child seem too serious or have a blank look on his face, i.e. not laughing or smiling much?
    • Does your child play with other children or does he prefer to play by himself? When he plays with other children, does he show any odd behaviors?
    • Does your child use toys incorrectly or play with things that are not toys in odd ways, i.e. obsess with disassembling everything?
    • Does your child have trouble holding a conversation with you, yet hold an impressive ongoing monologue, even though no one is listening any more?
    • Does your child have particular topics of extreme interest, i.e. garden hoses, vaccum cleaners, trains, weather, etc.?
    • Does your child fail to understand jokes and figures of speech?
    • Does your child have difficulty making eye contact?
    • Does your child dislike being touched, held or soothed?
    • Does your child overreact to small sensations and underreact to large sensations?
    • Does your child have a lot of anxiety, especially in social situations or new places?
    • Does your child seem to be extremely sensitive in a variety of ways?
    • Does your child have a speech/language delay?
    • Does your child have odd speech patterns, i.e. echoing parts of what others have just said or strange word references (our son called Scooby Doo "boo owie").
    • Does your child do things to soothe himself frequently, such as repetitive rocking, hand flapping, or other stimming behaviors?
    If you answered yes to any of the questions like these, it would be a good idea to pursue an evaluation for autism spectrum. Again, your child may not have every symptom, but random clusters of them. My biggest regret is not seeing things sooner and not getting therapy at the earliest possible time. I had a stereotype in my mind of what I thought autism looked like, but I was wrong. I missed the concept of the spectrum.

    If your son doesn't have a form of autism, he may have other issues, like sensory integration disorder or problems with mood or attention. That's why it's important to seek out a professional evaluation.

    You are young and doing great. It is a lot to handle, I know. But you're on the right path toward getting help and assistance. Hang in there!

    Weary Woman
     
  8. Mariah

    Mariah Guest

    Here are some more things to think about:
    • Do you ever feel like you can't connect emotionally with your child? Does it seem like he is somewhat detached?
    • yes
    • Does your child have difficulty with transitions or changes in routines?
    • sometimes
    • Do you notice your child has preferencs and aversions to textures and scents of food, clothing, etc.?
    • sometimes but he does have sensory integration disablility
    • Does your child seem too serious or have a blank look on his face, i.e. not laughing or smiling much?
    • people he knows well complains about this, but sometimes hes fine.
    • Does your child play with other children or does he prefer to play by himself? When he plays with other children, does he show any odd behaviors?
    • he really has only liked to play by himself in the past, but having a brother is helping. he sometimes just stares at other kids playing, but wont join when he does decide to be around other kids.
    • Does your child use toys incorrectly or play with things that are not toys in odd ways, i.e. obsess with disassembling everything?
    • he loves to be destructive and take things apart, he used to line up his cars when he was 2, but not anymore. he is barely beginning to play more with the toys rather than just run around jumping, and screaming or breaking things.
    • Does your child have trouble holding a conversation with you, yet hold an impressive ongoing monologue, even though no one is listening any more?
    • yes
    • Does your child have particular topics of extreme interest, i.e. garden hoses, vaccum cleaners, trains, weather, etc.?
    • not that he really obsesses about but he does talk about strange things sometimes. really is obsessed with sticks, guns and killing or "dying people" (disturbs me a lot)
    • Does your child fail to understand jokes and figures of speech?
    • only because he is 4, but he does get a lot of our weird ways we like to talk.
    • Does your child have difficulty making eye contact?
    • no not really.
    • Does your child dislike being touched, held or soothed?
    • always. but he is wanting it a little now that he sees his brother getting it. he never likes to sit close to me, hug us, cuddle us, or the like.
    • Does your child overreact to small sensations and underreact to large sensations?
    • not sure.
    • Does your child have a lot of anxiety, especially in social situations or new places?
    • yeah
    • Does your child seem to be extremely sensitive in a variety of ways?
    • not sure in what context you mean.... that is a difficult question though.
    • Does your child have a speech/language delay?
    • no.
    • Does your child have odd speech patterns, i.e. echoing parts of what others have just said or strange word references (our son called Scooby Doo "boo owie").
    • no, but as a toddler he used to jsay things backwards, like cup was "puc" and so on. now he says phrases backwards like instead of throat medicine, its medicine throat, and red ball is ball red.
    • Does your child do things to soothe himself frequently, such as repetitive rocking, hand flapping, or other stimming behaviors?
    • not to soothe himself, but he is just growing out of the head banging thing he has done since baby years because he thought it was fun i guess.
    thanks for everyones input. yes i am young, but i do everything i can for my kids as best I can. sometimes its like i just want someone to come to my house and do it all for me! or that a nanny will apear at my door step and walk me through it all, or that maybe all his doctors will explain everything together instead of me having to repeat myself every time i go to another one, or learn somthing new. its an ongoing battle that we have been dealing with forever. i feel like caving in and giving up sometimes but its something that i cant ignore. i wish i could just pretend these things were something in my head, but ignorance is not always bliss, and sometimes i am the only person in this family that persues the answers. frustrating, and exhausting, i dont look forward to appointments anymore. never feel like it helps anymore i guess.
     
  9. Marguerite

    Marguerite Active Member

    Welcome, Mariah. You mention that you're young as if it is a disadvantage. I don't believe it is. Perhaps it could give you an advantage in that you can till remember your own childhood more clearly; if so, this could help you hone your parental instinct to a fine edge. What maturity can give you that you don't have right now, is the confidence to trust your instincts. And even that is not age-based.

    My second daughter is at times very immature. She's almost 24 but sometimes an infantile brat. But her instinct for children and their needs is brilliant. I (she too) do think that the "infantile brat" stuff is connected to her being borderline Aspie.

    Mariah, your boys sound very much like Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) needs to be considered. That is the umbrella term that covers autism, Asperger's and similar. Also beware of the "alphabet soup" approach to diagnosis - this is a fragmentation of labels which can be mistaken for a constellation of different diagnoses, when in fact they are all also aspects of one, global diagnosis which can be helped.

    For example, my difficult child 3 who has a diagnosis of high functioning autism. His labels include hyperlexia (look it up, I think your older son has this); Sensory Integration Disorder (SID) (sensory integration disorder, which also greatly affects what he is prepared to eat); Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD); anxiety (to the point of nausea and vomiting); behaviour problems including raging; extreme self-centredness; ODD (informally applied by a teacher, but he fits the criteria); ADHD; language delay. There's probably more, but I tend to not think about the separate elements, instead I think about difficult child 3 as a whole.

    So don't think of the Sensory Integration Disorder (SID) as a separate disorder to anything else. It it too easy to fragment a diagnosis into a series of confusing labels.

    With autism, they generally don't behave or do anything not fond at some stage in 'normal' kids. But they do it at different times and to a different degree. They DO feel emotion, very keenly, but often don't show it in ways we recognise. The old ideas are changing, old beliefs need to go. Autism is not the result of the "cold mother" nor is it "a child locked in another world". They are very much trapped in this world and it can be terrifying for them, because they cannot control it. They tend to use repetition, patterns, things they love, as a way of coping. You can expand this for them as they can handle it. They do not understand the complex social structure and heirarchy of "I am the child, I must respect my parents and teachers because they are adults."
    difficult child 3 values those who give him what he craves - stimulation, education, information, occupation. He resents those who he perceives are limiting his access to these. Discipline for him has to be different - punishment-based is disastrous. Instead, we use positive motivation and direction.

    For example - a child tapping a pencil repeatedly on the school desk can annoy other kids, but it can also be something the kid can't control well, such as a stimulant. The wrong thing to do - "Stop tapping the pencil!" or "Stop that!" or even "If you tap that pencil again, you will be on detention."
    The right thing to do - "Put the pencil down and come over here to me."
    The second statement is a redirection. It also avoids the "don't" and "no" which these kids can hear so often it desensitises them and loses effect.

    That is just one simple example, but you can observe and see. We often recommend a great book here, "The Explosive Child" by Ross Greene. It helped us a great deal because it showed us what we were doing wrong as parents. Not that what we were doing was wrong in absolute terms, only wrong for kids like this. It made my life a lot easier, at the same time as helping us lead difficult child 3 towards a calmer, more productive life. Not perfect, still a long way to go, but what a difference!
    If you want a preview then check out the sticky on Early Childhood forum.

    Again, welcome, glad we're here for you. Stick round and let us know how you get on.

    Marg
     
  10. BeachPeace

    BeachPeace Guest

    Welcome! I am a newbie and this place is like a refuge in the wilderness!
    Please make sure you are taking care of yourself too - if you are very anxious or overwhelmed it makes the type of intense parenting we have to do even harder! I have been known to pack up and go to my mom's or sister's or mother in law's house for a couple of days, or just have them come stay with me. That is one of my "survival" tactics I use when things get rough.
    Hang in there and welcome!!!
    {{Hugs}} You have a found a safe place.
     
  11. Marguerite

    Marguerite Active Member

    Mariah, I just noticed your avatar. I hope it's not actually a photo of you and your kids, it is really important FOR YOU to maintain anonymity on this site. Of course here you're among friends, but the nature of this site later on especially can mean you need to vent about a doctor, a teacher, a neighbour, a family member. ANd if you can be tracked to here, then you will not be able to safely vent freely.

    I have learnt the hard way, that what I write about my kids has been tracked by a teacher, and then copies passed around the staffroom. Also at other times and in other issues, I have had stuff I've written used to do harm to my reputation even when what I had written (under my own name) was not offensive. It was the way it was presented to people. My words weren't themselves distorted, but were framed in a diatribe about how what I really meant was X. Pass that to someone paranoid, and the first I knew of it was when 'friends' took me aside then tore strips off me for what I had said about them personally (I had not) online. All because of one nasty mischief-maker.

    Anonymity is safest. Tell whoever you feel safest with, but go carefully.

    For example, my husband knows I post here - he lurks here, he finally joined. It has helped our teamwork enormously (and we had thought it was already as good as you could ever get). But no way could I vent about him here. Not unless I clear it with him first! And the same goes for him, too...

    Marg
     
  12. Marg's Man

    Marg's Man Member

    That Marg!

    She's always going about how she can't vent about me.

    Go ahead darling. Who knows I might learn something useful!

    Marg's Man
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2010
  13. confuzzled

    confuzzled Member

    who diagnosed both of your children with infantile anorexia? thats not exactly a common diagnosis in a young child....and to have two in the same family would be pretty unusual.

    have either of your children seen a PEDIATRIC gastroenterologist and/or a geneticist and had thorough testing to see why they dont eat? are you close to a major childrens hospital?

    i would be very concerned that someone is missing a medical reason for your childrens difficulties--and it could be a range of things from malabsorption issues to eosinophilic esophagitis to simple reflux, to a stricture, to the mechanics of chewing/swallowing, to heaven knows what....but you really, REALLY need to make sure every iota of a medical reason is ruled out.

    and its just not a job for the pediatrican--you would need someone specialized to know what to look for, and specialized testing (ph probes, biopsies, etc) to determine the cause.

    sorry to hear you had a rough weekend ;-(
     
  14. Mariah

    Mariah Guest

    actually yeah they have a pediatric gastrointerologist and a speach therapist, and a nutritionalist, and diatition, and also now will be going to another eating specialist soon. but yes they have done very extensive testing (actually just my oldest has, but my youngest is about to also). they have tested for so much stuff over the course of about a year and can not for the life of them figure out anything except that he has mild esophagitis caused by reflux which we have treated for about 6 months now. nothing else was found. nothing wrong with how his mouth and throat works, nothing wrong with his stomache or any diseses so far. they think its behavioral. we do have a childrens hospital nearby that we use. we even have had him admitted to it for almost a week for thourough evaluating. he absorbs nutrients. we had him on a feeding tube for a week and he gained about 3-4 lbs. but he wont eat. when he was on the feeding tube, he got even less interested in food and wanted to just have it pumped into him instead. thats why we dont have him on it anymore. he likes the taste of cirtain foods, but does not choose to eat them. we have tried evything and i mean EVERYTHING to get him to eat. you mention it, we have already done it. that is when my mom found that autism was linked to anorexia in children. since then i have learned that maybe its not physical. maybe his eating is mental or behavioral in the sence that he needs a diagnosis of a mental condition such as what we have been talking about here. very long process. very frustrating. many dead ends.
     
  15. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    Hi Mariah, sounds like your mom does pretty decent research!

    And to look at the answers you gave online here (great job, WW), I would say your son is on the spectrum. I'm not a dr, just a mom with-a kid who's on the spectrum. My son had serious reflux as a baby and toddler. I am SO glad he's beyond that now.

    FYI, doing a test for the esophagus is not the same as for something in the gut like Celiac or Crohn's disease. I hate to send you to another dr, but I'd suggest a Celiac test. You can ask for it at the same time they do a regular blood draw for a physical, but you must be sure to ask for it separately. It's not part of a regular CBC. (That's in case you don't want to make a special trip just to have it done.)

    Autism and gluten allergies are very closely linked.

    I think you said earlier that you weren't willing to go with-a gluten-free diet, but it could have a LOT to do with-your son's inablity to absorb nutrients. When he was fed with-a tube, exactly what was he given? Glucose, protein, sodium and calcium, I'll bet. Chances are, there was no gluten in the feeding.

    I hate to harp on it, but ... okay, I'll harp on it. ;)
    I'm not young (50-ish) so that means I can do things like that.
    Right, Marg's Man?
     
  16. Mariah

    Mariah Guest

    hes been tested for ciliac. and other diseases too. no dice. they might have tested for crohns, but dont know all they tested for. they tested the nomal things and the out of norm things that are very rare. DS is on boost kid essentials and was on the pediasure for a long time. the boost kid essiantials or pediasure is what he had in his tube.
     
  17. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    Okay, here are the ingredients in choc boost. The only gluten I can see is whey.
    Chocolate Flavor

    NFP

    Ingredients

    WATER, SUGAR, MALTODEXTRIN, FRUCTOSE, SODIUM CASEINATE (MILK), HIGH OLEIC SUNFLOWER OIL, SOYBEAN OIL, COCOA PROCESSED WITH ALKALI, MEDIUM CHAIN TRIGLYCERIDES, WHEY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, CALCIUM CASEINATE AND LESS THAN 0.5% OF CALCIUM PHOSPHATE TRIBASIC, CELLULOSE GEL, POTASSIUM CITRATE, SOY LECITHIN, MAGNESIUM PHOSPHATE TRIBASIC, CHOLINE CHLORIDE, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR, SODIUM CHLORIDE, CARRAGEENAN, ASCORBIC ACID, CELLULOSE GUM, TAURINE, M-INOSITOL, ALPHA TOCOPERYL ACETATE, FERROUS SULFATE, ZINC SULFATE, NIACINAMIDE, L-CARNITINE, CALCIUM PANTOTHENATE, VITAMIN B6 HYDROCHLORIDE, THIAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE, COPPER GLUCONATE, MANGANESE SULFATE, RIBOFLAVIN, BHA/BHT (TO PRESERVE FRESHNESS), VITAMIN A PALMITATE, BETA CAROTENE, FOLIC ACID, BIOTIN, CHROMIUM CHLORIDE, POTASSIUM IODIDE, SODIUM MOLYBDATE, SODIUM SELENITE, VITAMIN K1, VITAMIN D3, VITAMIN B12.

    Probiotic Straw: Canola
     
  18. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    I like your new photo. Sorry you had to take down the other one but it makes sense.

    Can you write a profile/bio that goes at the bottom of your posts? ... for my addling brain ... ;)
     
  19. Mariah

    Mariah Guest

    so is that good or bad? looked up hyperlexia. not quite sure if it sounds like him or not. i guess i need to ask some of my family if he has some symptoms of it. thanks for everyones input. its good to talk to people how have experience with this stuff as well.
     
    Lasted edited by : Jul 5, 2010
  20. Mariah

    Mariah Guest

    oh thanks. its from prison break. im obsessed with that show!! anyways, i was thinking about making the bio, but not sure what to put down there. i looked up all the abbreviations and stuff, but i still dont understand how to make the bio.
     
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