Neurontin info and experiences

Discussion in 'General Parenting Archives' started by EastCoastChris, Feb 28, 2002.

  1. EastCoastChris

    EastCoastChris New Member

    gabapentin

    Pronunciation: ga bah PEN tin
    Brand: Neurontin

    What is the most important information I should know about gabapentin?
    • Do not stop taking your medication, even if you feel better. It is important to continue taking gabapentin to prevent your seizures from recurring.
    • Carry or wear a medical identification tag to let others know that you are taking this medicine in the case of an emergency.
    • Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Gabapentin may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities.


    What is gabapentin?
    • Gabapentin is used to control seizures. The exact way that it works is unknown. However, it is believed that gabapentin alters the chemical impulses in the brain that cause seizures.
    • Gabapentin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.


    What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking gabapentin?
    • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions, especially kidney, liver, or heart disease. Also discuss any medicines that you take, including over-the-counter preparations.
    • Gabapentin is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether gabapentin will harm an unborn baby. Do not take gabapentin without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.
    • It is not known whether gabapentin passes into breast milk. Do not take gabapentin without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.


    How should I take gabapentin?
    • Take gabapentin exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.
    • Take each dose of gabapentin with a full glass of water.
    • Gabapentin can be taken with or without food.
    • Carry or wear a medical identification tag to let others know that you are taking this medicine in the case of an emergency.
    • Do not stop taking your medication even if you feel better. It is important to prevent your seizures from recurring.
    • Store gabapentin at room temperature away from moisture and heat.


    What happens if I miss a dose?
    • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.


    What happens if I overdose?
    • Seek emergency medical treatment.
    • Symptoms of a gabapentin overdose include double vision, drowsiness, slurred speech, diarrhea, poor coordination, and difficulty breathing.


    What should I avoid while taking gabapentin?
    • Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Gabapentin may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities.
    • Avoid alcohol. Alcohol may increase your risk of having a seizure while you are taking gabapentin.


    What are the possible side effects of gabapentin?
    • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking gabapentin and seek medical attention immediately:
    · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); or
    · worsening of seizures.
    • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take gabapentin and talk to your doctor if you experience
    · dizziness, poor coordination, or drowsiness;
    · blurred or double vision;
    · irregular back-and- forth movements of the eyes;
    · nausea and vomiting; or
    · tremor.
    • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.


    What other drugs will affect gabapentin?
    • Gabapentin does not interact with other commonly used antiseizure medications.
    • Antacids will decrease the amount of gabapentin that is absorbed by your stomach. Do not take any antacid for 2 hours before and 2 hours after taking a dose of gabapentin.
    • Gabapentin may increase the effects of other drugs that cause drowsiness, including antidepressants, alcohol, antihistamines, sedatives (used to treat insomnia), pain relievers, anxiety medicines, and muscle relaxants.
    • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with gabapentin or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.


    Where can I get more information?
    • Your pharmacist has additional information about gabapentin written for health professionals that you may read.
     
  2. Guest

    Tried this myself for chronic pain- did nothing. Tried on difficult child as a mood stablizer- did nothing. No side effects though so is a good drug to at least try- does not require blood draws like other mood stabilizers. I have read that if you are on a mood stabilizer that if you add Neurontin it will increase the effectiveness of that mood stabilizer. So here is a summary
    Neurontin= no help
    Mood stabilizer= help
    Mood stabilizer and Neurontin=more help!

    Hows that?
     
  3. my girl

    my girl New Member

    husband is taking it along with adderall and buspar. Was diagnosis with adhd and anxiety, but there may be a BPII diagnosis too. Supposedly works as a mood stabilizer for some with refractory BiPolar (BP) II not responsive to other medication therapy.

    According to husband, he notices a difference. In his words, it takes the edge off. The lows are not cataclysmic. I've noticed too, where his general mood used to be negative, he now talks of being happy, of noticing the good things in his life. It has made for a much more serene household, and he has not had any side effects as of yet. Along those same lines, it does not make him feel out of sorts, or sedated in any way.
     
  4. rln

    rln New Member

    Hi,

    #1 was put on Neurontin for violent outbursts, etc. She was also taking prozac at the same time.

    I saw great improvement in her moods, anger, etc. I feel that it helped her. She isn't taking it anymore but continues to take prozac. I don't recall her having any negative side effects and I asked the pharmacy(sp??) about wearing a medication-alert bracelet. He told me that if she wasn't taking it for seizures that it wasn't necessary.

    I feel that we had a positive experience with it.

    Take Care, MTNMOM
     
  5. Guest

    Jake became more agitated and irritable both (two) times he was on Neurontin, so it wasn't a good experience for us.

    I sometimes think psychiatrists like to try it because blood draws are not needed and apparently it is difficult to OD on.

    Bottom line - you know your child best. What works for one may not work for another.

    Jean
     
  6. Guest

    Fran,
    I've taken Nuerontin for over 2 years now for chronic pain from Trigeminal Neuralgia--it has been a life-saver for me--and it helps with my moods also!!!
     
  7. Faithful-Heart

    Faithful-Heart New Member

    I tried this for myself last summer due to feeling such intense anger at times...mainly due to neighborhoods kids causing problems...as if I didn't have enough stress with Nate! I started on a very low dose and accourding to the psychiatrist I should not have felt anything but I did. Tons of dizziness to the point I didn't feel safe driving and I have to be able to drive...with all of Nate's appointment's, ect. I don't think I lasted a week on it and had to stop taking it. :( The anger problem took care of itselfs as soon as certain kids in the neighbor left...grrrrr.
     
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