Should we be worried?

Discussion in 'The Watercooler' started by tiredmommy, Apr 26, 2009.

  1. tiredmommy

    tiredmommy Site Moderator

  2. Jena

    Jena New Member

    that's so weird, i was just telling my friend last night whose husband is flying into california to be careful.

    from what i have read, and i didn't read your links, there have been no deaths in the u.s. as of yet regarding this.

    alot have died in mexico though.

    I don't think there is anything we can do other than just make sure to take precaution having kids wash hands, etc. My friend just told me it hit a town near us, amityville.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2009
  3. tiredmommy

    tiredmommy Site Moderator

    Some HS students were sickened in NYC, 1 person in Ohio...

    But why do the officials fear a pandemic? Is this disease that contagious? Is it potentially that deadly?
     
  4. Hound dog

    Hound dog Nana's are Beautiful

    I'm wondering if that single person in ohio is truely a single person..........or just the only case that was actually reported.

    Not paranoid, just that's the way it works.

    I do know we've got a strain of "flu" in the area that is making people deathly sick and they're having one heck of a time throwing it off. Our ERs, doctor offices, and such have been packed.

    Not much you can do about it though. It's a virus. No way to kill it, no way to treat it. Except attempting to prevent dehydration. Not even a good way to prevent it. Not even by avoiding those who are sick, cuz people are usually most contagious before actually showing symptoms.

    So.....I'm keeping my eyes and ears open and refusing to worry too over much at this point.

    Reminds me of what my Mom refers to as the Asiatic flu back in the mid 60's. Bad outbreak. Caused my pre-mature birth and nearly killed my Mom.
     
  5. Jena

    Jena New Member

    from what i have read it's highly contagious the incubation period is 3 days only. so it moves person to person quickly.
     
  6. Jena

    Jena New Member

    i agree with-lisa there is nothing we can do. it's one of those things. we just have to take precaution and roll with-it best we possibly can.

    there are medications for it, they've been shipped over already i heard incase we get hit badly. just stinks cause it's summertime also
     
  7. Jena

    Jena New Member

  8. ThreeShadows

    ThreeShadows Quid me anxia?

    Heck! I'll worry about anything! father in law was born same year as Titanic sank, 1912. He told us stories of the Spanish influenza hitting Philly and of the bodies being removed from homes as he watched from his parents' apt. window.

    [ame]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_flu[/ame]


    "The Spanish flu, which circled the world in 1918 and 1919 and killed at least 50 million people, was of the same general subtype, H1N1, as the virus in California and Mexico." Quote from Washington Post.

    I know this is totally tasteless but when father in law told his stories I always thought of this Monty Python scene about the great plagues of the Middle Ages:

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grbSQ6O6kbs"]YouTube - Monty Python-Bring out your dead![/ame]
     
  9. hearts and roses

    hearts and roses Mind Reader

    3 Shadows, thanks; I forgot how hilarious Monty Python was!!

    I think we just need to be a little bit more mindful of washing and being in confined spaces, like offices without windows that open (like mine). I work with a hypochondriac (and her H is also). They seem to pick up any sort of plague within miles and miles. If there is a flu in Alaska, they will catch it, no lie. I had better be extra careful! I know it's not a joking matter, but I also don't think we should all start to panic either.
     
  10. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    Swine flu typically only passes from hogs to humans, but there are occasional outbreaks that go the human to human route. It's been seen before, but it's not the usual transmission route.

    What makes this a potential pandemic virus is:
    1) This is a new strain of swine flu that is a combination of human, hog, and bird virus, so our bodies haven't built up any immunities to it.
    2) Those most at risk for serious cases are in the otherwise healthy adult category. Typically with flu those most at risk for death are infants, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems. But pandemic type influenzas fit this category of infecting otherwise healthy adults 25-40ish (SARS, 1918 influenza epidemic which killed 50 million worldwide).
    3) This new strain is resistant to 2 of the 4 anti-virals (Tamiflu type drugs) on the market.
    4) Viruses can mutate quickly.
    5) There is no vaccine and even though plans are being made just in case, it will take months to get into production.
    5) Widespread global travel--need I say more?

    http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/key_facts.htm

    This is about avian flu but it explains the crossover between species well.
    http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian/gen-info/transmission.htm
     
  11. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    Well, since most flus (sp?) seem to kill by dehydration, I think we're fairly safe, assuming we get to a hospital if need be. We are very lucky in this country. I'm betting that the otherwise healthy Mexicans who died never considered going to a hospital, or lived in rural areas. They're still gathering data.
    It sounds like a nasty one, either way.
    I was surprised to see photos in the paper of Mexicans getting flu shots. Why? (See SRL's note for info.)
     
  12. tiredmommy

    tiredmommy Site Moderator

    Okay... from a personal standpoint: should I have a heightened sense of awareness of this because of Duckie's asthma? When do I call the doctor if she gets sick? Do I need to have tamiflu on hand?
     
  13. TerryJ2

    TerryJ2 Well-Known Member

    Tamiflu won't work, from what I've read.
    I got the impression this was a stomach virus.
    Correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  14. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    Tamiflu and another antiviral (brand name Relenza) appear to be effective against this strain. At this time they aren't recommending that any specific population keep Tamiflu on hand, but you should definitely call the doctor if she gets sick. You can watch the CDC website for changes in recommendations.

    As for the asthma, it's probably a good idea to have refills of all her regular asthma, sinus, allergy medications on hand. I'm calling tomorrow to replenish our supplies.

    I'm also tucking anti-bacterial wipes into school lunch bags tomorrow.
     
  15. SRL

    SRL Active Member

    I saw some early speculation that the mortality rate for infants and the elderly could possibly be due to more of them having had the flu vaccines and the possibility of the vaccine providing some kind of immunity, even though this strain wasn't included. I've not been reading that in the most recent reports but maybe people are getting the shots because it's one thing they can do.

    Edited to add: I just read an article below saying that the season vaccine is showing no crossover protection, but that people who had been exposed a lot to flu viruses (such as older people) may have some natural immunity.

    updated 4:16 p.m. CT, Sun., April 26, 2009
    ATLANTA - U.S. health officials say they are "very pessimistic" that the seasonal flu vaccine protects against the unique swine flu infecting people in the United States, Mexico and other countries.
    A U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official said Sunday afternoon that tests of the seasonal vaccine and the new virus show no cross-reaction, suggesting that people who got the vaccine have no added protection against the new bug.
    It's possible that people who have been exposed to flu viruses every year — especially older people, with a greater exposure history — may have some natural immunity, the CDC official said in a call with reporters.
    updated 4:16 p.m. CT, Sun., April 26, 2009
    ATLANTA - U.S. health officials say they are "very pessimistic" that the seasonal flu vaccine protects against the unique swine flu infecting people in the United States, Mexico and other countries.
    A U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official said Sunday afternoon that tests of the seasonal vaccine and the new virus show no cross-reaction, suggesting that people who got the vaccine have no added protection against the new bug.
    It's possible that people who have been exposed to flu viruses every year — especially older people, with a greater exposure history — may have some natural immunity, the CDC official said in a call with reporters.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2009
  16. flutterby

    flutterby Fly away!

    I think anyone with a potentially weakened immune system should add extra precautions.

    From what I read, the virus seems to be less severe (more mild) here than in Mexico and they're trying to figure out why.
     
  17. SRL

    SRL Active Member

  18. gcvmom

    gcvmom Here we go again!

    Personally, I think the best defense is handwashing: after the toilet, before you eat, and if you've been out in public touching things like handrails, keypads, elevator buttons, doorknobs, etc. , don't touch your nose/mouth/eyes with your hands/fingers unless they've been washed. :) This may not be something to go overboard on most of the year, but if there's a particularly virulent bug going around your area, better safe than sorry.

    I somehow managed to stay well this past month despite the rest of my family coming down with a flu-like bug. All I can think of to explain it is that I used a little more diligence in my handwashing during that time --- that and a 10-foot pole :winks:
     
  19. witzend

    witzend Well-Known Member

    Here's what the CDC and WHO is saying: Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds, frequently. Don't touch your face, mouth, nose, eyes, unless your hands have just been washed. Stay out of confined spaces with lots of people if possible. Stand at least 6 feet away from anyone who might be ill.
     
  20. KTMom91

    KTMom91 Well-Known Member

    Saw this in both the local paper and the San Francisco Chronicle. I think there have been 7 cases in Southern CA so far. The pictures of people in Mexico wearing masks were scary.
     
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