TIME TO WRITE A TRANSITION PLAN-HELP APPRECIATED

Discussion in 'Special Ed 101' started by SearchingForRainbows, Dec 20, 2007.

  1. SearchingForRainbows

    SearchingForRainbows Active Member

    difficult child 2 will be sixteen within four months. He was recently diagnosed with Asperger's. (Will update sig soon.) After the holidays, we're going to schedule a Team Meeting to write a Transition Plan for him. We had the school do a vocational assessment and the results weren't good. In a nutshell, it said that even if appropriate services are put in place, we still should prepare for the possibility of a group home and guardianship should difficult child 2 not make substantial progress.

    My original thoughts were to focus difficult child 2's remaining time in high school on the skills that he will need to do whatever type of work he is best suited for according to the results of the vocational assessment. However, difficult child 2 is absolutely clueless as to what he wants to do other than win millions in the lottery, not work, eat chocolate, and play with monkeys - HELP!!!

    The vocational assessment said that maybe he could be trained to work as a fast food worker or a bell-hop if he doesn't make substantial progress in high school. (difficult child 2 expressed interest in being a bell-hop. He also expressed interest in being a manager of a business, lol.) If he makes substantial progress, the assessment said that people with his profile can make good researchers or become skilled in computer work. (I honestly don't see difficult child 2 working on computers. A job involving research might be a remote possibility.)

    difficult child 2's academic skills with the exception of grammar and spelling are good. He is of average to above average intelligence in some areas, and remembers just about every fact from every book he reads. Unfortunately, he can't apply what he learns in books to real life situations.

    difficult child 2 has very poor social skills and minimal self-care skills. On top of this, he has absolutely no common sense. We want his transition plan to focus heavily on daily living skills and self-care skills. Realistically, what can we expect from our school district in regard to providing daily living skills and self-care skills? We have a very poor school district. On top of this, our school district doesn't have any sort of daily living skills program or offer any type of help with self-care skills that we know of.

    I am determined to help difficult child 2 become as self-sufficient as possible. There was a time I didn't even think he would be able to talk. I'm not about to give up now!!!

    Any help, advice, or information regarding what services our school district should provide in his Transition Plan are greatly appreciated!!!
    WFEN
     
  2. Sheila

    Sheila Moderator

    You may need to know that IEP students can stay in school until they are 22 unless the student graduates with a regular diploma.

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Realistically, what can we expect from our school district in regard to providing daily living skills and self-care skills? We have a very poor school district. On top of this, our school district doesn't have any sort of daily living skills program or offer any type of help with self-care skills that we know of.
    </div></div>

    They need to provide whatever your son needs; not offer a predesigned curriculum. IEP = Individual Education Plan.

    http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/trans.index.htm may be helpful for you.
     
  3. Mrs Smith

    Mrs Smith New Member

    I'm in the same boat. Our school district has a life skills class but that's more for kids with Downs and MR. As far as I know there is no program that would be both academically rigorous and address self-care issues. Our county has some transition programming but still mostly for the more severely disabled. There's a huge gap in this area. I'll be following this thread too.
     
  4. Mrs Smith

    Mrs Smith New Member

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sheila</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You may need to know that IEP students can stay in school until they are 22 unless the student graduates with a regular diploma.

    They need to provide whatever your son needs; not offer a predesigned curriculum. IEP = Individual Education Plan.

    http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/trans.index.htm may be helpful for you.

    </div></div>

    Why do I have to choose? Why can't my son get a regular diploma, AND stay in school until he's 22 AND get life skills training under the conditions of an IEP?
     
  5. SearchingForRainbows

    SearchingForRainbows Active Member

    Sheila,

    Once again, THANKS!!! I've book-marked the site and plan on returning to it this evening. There is so much info here - Thanks again. WFEN
     
  6. SearchingForRainbows

    SearchingForRainbows Active Member

    Josie,

    I don't think you have to choose. I think what this means is that if your son graduates with a regular diploma, he isn't in need of SPED services. Your son can graduate with all the requirements of a regular diploma at 22 and receive daily living skills while under an IEP. Does this make sense? WFEN
     
  7. JJJ

    JJJ Active Member

    Josie,

    If he likes to play with monkeys, does your HS have a Vet tech asst program? Ours does and it is a mixed class of some college-prep kids looking to become vets and some life-skills kids looking for a job that they will enjoy and be successful at after high school (i.e. vet tech assistant)
     
  8. Mrs Smith

    Mrs Smith New Member

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: WishingForEmptyNest</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Josie,

    I don't think you have to choose. I think what this means is that if your son graduates with a regular diploma, he isn't in need of SPED services. Your son can graduate with all the requirements of a regular diploma at 22 and receive daily living skills while under an IEP. Does this make sense? WFEN </div></div>

    WFEN, my understanding is that he can get a regular diploma even with SPED services but he must graduate on time. If you want to extend until 22, you don't get a regular diploma but a "thanks for coming" certificate. I'm greedy, I want both.

    Sheila, have I misinterpreted this?
     
  9. Mrs Smith

    Mrs Smith New Member

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JJJ</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Josie,

    If he likes to play with monkeys, does your HS have a Vet tech asst program? Ours does and it is a mixed class of some college-prep kids looking to become vets and some life-skills kids looking for a job that they will enjoy and be successful at after high school (i.e. vet tech assistant)

    </div></div>

    JJJ - that was WFEN's difficult child who loves to play with monkeys - LOL! We do have a great tech school though that has animal husbandry but of course, my son has no interest in anything there. So far, I've only heard the regular HS as the other choice. Very few options as they age out.
     
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