Anyone used Voc-Rehab services

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by everywoman, May 1, 2007.

  1. everywoman

    everywoman Active Member

    difficult child had a meeting today. He has a caseworker. She is getting his records from mental health and he said something about needing his last IEP from the school district. What services can he expect/ask for? I am trying to let him be a "man" and handle his own affairs--but I might need to nudge him a bit from the side.
     
  2. katmom,

    I can talk about voc rehab from the other side, I worked for them for 20 years here in a urban area in the South. I don't know where you are, but the services vary widely from state to state. Our program offered excellent neuropsy or psy testing, vocational evaluation and vocational counseling. For some folks we paid for school - college or training program and/or job placement and/or job coaching. As soon as my difficult child is old enough, I plan to get him to our local group for an intake evaluation. These vocational programs are like most programs - the squeaky wheels get the most attention and usually the best services. I think that it will be good for him to attend his appointments and follow through with the services.
     
  3. everywoman

    everywoman Active Member

    Thanks for the information. I hope they can offer him some sort of voc training and pysch treatment---he is off of my insurance now because of the choices he made in education---and is unable to afford services or find a job on his own.
     
  4. katmom,

    Again, depending on your state and the availability of funds, the psychological treatment may or may not be provided. However, most states do have good contracts with vocational training programs. Job coaching programs are excellent, and I highly recommend them. The job coach is a professional who sometimes develops a job, educates the employer/employees as to their client's disability and its ramifications in the workplace, and trains them on potential strategies to make the placement work. They then,personally learn the job, and work on the job with the client until they (the job coach) can gradually "fade" out. In our state, the job coaches will attend and work for a day if the client cannot come to work-and this is a selling point to the employer. This type of strong hands-on service really makes a difference in job outcomes. Interestingly, the employers often find that the job coaches help their other "regular employees". Of course we know, there is no such thing as a "regular employee". :smile:
     
  5. Sunlight

    Sunlight Active Member

    I think too it is hard to get them help if they continue to abuse substances. with ant I found they did not even want to deal with him because he will not stop drinking. they have other people who are more ready for help and more apt to participate in their own recovery.

    If I were you I would let your son handle it all on his own so that if he is ready he will show it.
     
  6. everywoman

    everywoman Active Member

    Thanks Janet for your reply. This week he is clean. I have turned it all over to him (and God)---and much as my control freak personality will let me (LOL). I have not been to court or any appts. with him. I have not nagged about finding a job. On Friday he will face the judge. He will be appointed a probabtion officier--and I hope its a tough one. I want him to have to stay clean. He knows that he is facing 2 years if he doesn't do what he is supposed to do.
     
  7. Sunlight

    Sunlight Active Member

    let this time be your cut the apron strings time. you are still there to love him and pray for him. let him find his way so he learns how when you are not able to be there for him.

    by the way dont count on the PO being too harsh. ant had only one harsh one and she was overboard and not helpful. the one he has now never sees him or returns calls. he sits in the bars, and moved out of the county..both against probation rules. no one ever called here or came for a surprise pee test.
     
  8. everywoman

    everywoman Active Member

    The strings are cut! I'm sorry ant continues to mess up. It is so frustrating when you know what could be...my bio-dad was a major difficult child until his death at age 57. My grandparents who raised me taught me the detachment skills I have needed with my own difficult child. I will always love my son, but I will not support his choices to use drugs or commit crimes. When he is willing to help himself, I am willing to provide support. When he chooses to mess up, I step back and let him face the consequences. My grandparents did this with by biodad his entire life...he never learned; hopefully, my difficult child will.
     
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