Back again because things are worse/pituitary problems

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by Mag, Jan 17, 2007.

  1. Mag

    Mag New Member

    I used to keep a closer eye on this board back a few years ago when my son was 13. Since then we've been struggling along as well as we could, but lately things have gotten so bad, I'm back looking for help and encouragement :frown:

    To bring it up to date, difficult child is now 16, going on 17. He's still only 4'11" and about 85 lbs. He has a thyroid disorder which he takes synthyroid for, and he's being evaluated for possible pituitary problems, as he hasn't even started puberty yet. He had a CAT scan which didn't show anything obviously wrong and lots of bloodwork. As we work with the endocrinologist in the next few months, he may end up having growth hormone shots....but that's a future decision. We were told way back that he's ADHD, but I think it's closer to Asperger's with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), he has terrible impulse control, and is really getting physical with his rages the last few months. We've seen 3 different psychiatrists...just recently our current Dr seemed to be stumped by what to do next and sent us to #3 for a fresh opinion. The 'new guy' gave us a good long consultation, took all my notes, promised that he could help us change things, then just seemed to decide that all difficult child's problems stem from anger over his size, and that once he grows, he'll also 'grow up.' (Of course, we've had troubles since he was about 5, so I don't know where he comes up with that....)

    We work weekly with a wonderful psychologist who has tried everything under the sun as far as behavior modification goes and stands with us all the way, but he realizes we can't go on like this either.

    I guess what I'm looking for is a little guidance.....things have gotten to the point where difficult child knows if he physically attacks us again, the police are coming, but that's a REALLY, REALLY hard call to make that first time. We're also considering having him hospitalized to see if they can find something better medication-wise, but that's another 'unknown area' to us...very scary.

    Does anybody have any experience with either thyroid or pituitary problems causing rages/immaturity? That if that DID get corrected, things would improve? On the other hand, I'm afraid that we'll just get a bigger, stronger kid to handle during rages :frown:
     
  2. Sara PA

    Sara PA New Member

    I'd be looking at the two antidepressants as the causes of violence, rages and impulsive, immature behavior before the thyroid or pituitary problems. Antidepressants are a known cause of violent, hostile behavior for some people, especially kids. And if that's what's causing or contributing to his behavior, no medication or therapy will change it.

    And my advice about calling the police is to make sure you are willing to accept the possible consequences which can include loss of control of your childs medical care before you do it.
     
  3. smallworld

    smallworld Moderator

    According to The Bipolar Child, medical conditions that can mimic mood disorders include hypothyroidism (page 33). I'm wondering if that's what's going on with your difficult child.

    You may also want to have your difficult child evaluated by a neuropsychologist, a developmental pediatrician or an autism clinic at a children's or university hospital. Psychiatrists don't generally make an Asperger's diagnosis.
     
  4. dreamer

    dreamer New Member

    have you checked into possible side effects or contra indications of growth hormones?
     
  5. Josie

    Josie Active Member

    I don't have experience with thyroid or pituitary problems causing that kind of problem but I do have experience with celiac disease and gluten intolerance which can cause short stature, thyroid problems, delayed puberty, being underweight, ADHD-like behaviour, and anger issues. You could ask his doctor to run a celiac panel (blood test) to check if they haven't already. The test has a high false negative rate so even if it is negative, you might want to try eliminating gluten from his diet to see if at least his behaviour improves quickly. My daughter's behaviour improved within a few days and this is not uncommon according to a celiac board that I read.
     
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