Regional names for things

Discussion in 'The Watercooler' started by SomewhereOutThere, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    The U.S. is so big that we have different dialects, regional pet names and differences. Anything unique to your neck of the woods?

    When I first got to Wisconsin, I had to get used to stoplights being called stop and go lights! I still just call them stoplights.

    I came from Chicago where soda was called pop so I adjusted to that. Now that I have been in Wisconsin for twenty years calling soda by the noun of pop sounds odd to me.

    Also, the further north you go in Wisconsin, the more you hear a Canadian "accent" (for lack of a better word). But, no, I dont hear "eh" lol ;)
     
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  2. Old-hand

    Old-hand Active Member

    Oh boy... this is a hard one.

    The biggest one for us is, "eh", being Canadian and all, and yes, it's used a lot! :)

    Trying to think of a few others to add. May need some time to ponder...

    For us, "pop", is still the most common name I hear for soda, and "java", "mud", or "brew" for coffee.

    How about children's snow pants, in our house they were always called "waterproof pants".
     
  3. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    Snowpants here and coffee is coffee.

    Are you in Canada?
     
  4. Old-hand

    Old-hand Active Member

    We are, SWOT. We're just East of the West Coast.
     
  5. Old-hand

    Old-hand Active Member

    There's "Poutine", another Canadian term of ours.
     
  6. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    What does that mean? Coffee?

    Do you use a lot of British words to describe things? Like shag? Lol. I know sweater means simething different in Brit than it does here, but forget what it means. There is so much Brit slang that is different than ours. Its all English, but its still different :)
    Sometimes like a diff language.
     
  7. Old-hand

    Old-hand Active Member

    My apologies, SWOT, no, Poutine, is French fries and cheese curds topped with a brown gravy. We also do ketchup and gravy.

    Do you guys call winter caps that are woven with wool or cotton, "toques"?

    Yeah, I just love the differences between certain words in the UK as compared to Canada (or the US for that matter).

    You guys use "grits", too, if I'm not mistaken? We don't here.
     
  8. SomewhereOutThere

    SomewhereOutThere Well-Known Member

    Wow. What hit me the most is...ketchup and gravy??? Is it good?

    Well, a Chicago thing is hot dogs with ketchup. Awesome!!

    We just call our winter hats hats...lol. Do you have special names for other winter wear...coats, gloves, mittens, heavy socks, boots? Other clothes items? Summer clothes like swimsuits, shorts, tops?

    Do you know what a sweater is when somebody from the UK uses the word?

    Anyone from the UK here to help?

    We do use grits.
     
  9. Old-hand

    Old-hand Active Member

    We have friends who live back East (Ontario), and they have a slight accent reminiscent of a New York accent.
     
  10. Littleboylost

    Littleboylost On the road unwanted to travel

    Do you refer to snowmobiles and sleds? We do here especially in northern Ontario.
     
  11. pigless in VA

    pigless in VA Well-Known Member

    I believe the Brits call a sweater a "jumper." I thought it was a type of shoe.

    In Virginia's northern neck, it is called "Wal-Mark." One lady also called a desk, "dest."

    One of my exes called those knitted hats "toebonnets." He asked me to get the toebonnet from the closet, and I busted out laughing. It sounds like a sock to me.

    People in the southern part of Virginia all say "burfday." They haven't a clue they are saying it wrong. "Bafroom" is another one. "Cawn" and "si REEENS."

    The oddest thing I have ever heard anyone say was "athernoon." Try it. It is so much easier to say afternoon. Death and deaf are sometimes interchangeable, and you have to pay attention to context.

    We had a lovely preschool teacher from New York who habitually turned the "a" sound at the end of a name into an "r."
    One year she had an "Aver" "Rever" and "Alysser" in her class. Reva's mom complained.
     
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  12. Old-hand

    Old-hand Active Member

    I hear "sleds" a lot, same for "bikes" (motorcycles).
     
  13. Old-hand

    Old-hand Active Member

    Most interesting. So happy you chimed in. :)
     
  14. Littleboylost

    Littleboylost On the road unwanted to travel

    Many of my American friends say that we say about and hockey very differently than they do.
     
  15. pigless in VA

    pigless in VA Well-Known Member

    All y'all are welcome.
     
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  16. Old-hand

    Old-hand Active Member

    I've always wondered about this one. :) I've always really liked it!
     
  17. Littleboylost

    Littleboylost On the road unwanted to travel

    My husband is British. He is from North England. I crack up because he drops the H at the beginning of some words and but then adds an n to the a.
    Example: a hammer becomes an ammer. Lol
     
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  18. Old-hand

    Old-hand Active Member

    So very interesting. I watch a lot of BBC, and often have a difficult time understanding what's being said, especially if the actors and actresses are talking fast.
     
  19. Littleboylost

    Littleboylost On the road unwanted to travel

    I had a hard time understanding my husband if he was not in the same room as me where I could see him and hear him. I still can't understand a single thing my father in law on the phone.
     
  20. Old-hand

    Old-hand Active Member

    I don't feel so alone now. :) I was beginning to think it was just me.