Reopening the U.S. - What does everyone think...

Discussion in 'The Watercooler' started by RN0441, Apr 17, 2020.

  1. RN0441

    RN0441 100% better than I was but not at 100% yet

    Just wanted to have some friendly discussion on what everyone thinks about Governors being in charge of reopening their states as they see fit.

    I'm glad to see some movement in this direction. So many businesses and people suffering right now financially.

    Of course, I also do not want to catch the virus nor give it to anyone else.

    I think the approach of doing it in small increments is a good one for the majority of the population. We all have to be responsible for our own health and to do what is necessary to stay safe.
     
  2. BusynMember

    BusynMember Well-Known Member

    Our governor is going to go very slowly and carefully and I am worried about health first. I am glad to wait. I think our country will be very different once this is over. And I agree with the doctors that it won't really be over until there is a vaccine which could take years. I am normally a big optimist, but also a realist...Corona isn't going away and in my opinion we will probably get a fall outbreak. Not everyone is good at knowing how to be safe and I want as many people as possible protected.

    Our company is doing a lot more online sales but is losing money. Fortunately we don't have a lot of employees and so far have kept everyone employed. So they still have paychecks.

    This is not the first time the world has turned upside down and we needed to change what is "normal." I believe this is like WWII and will have forever effects. Yes, I believe things will not be the same until we can control Corona.

    Right now I am hearing about, on the news, a possible treatment by a drug that treats Ebola as promising. It is 68% successful in clinical trials, but needs more testing. I will pray for the best and go one day at a time. Blessings to all.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2020
  3. Copabanana

    Copabanana Well-Known Member

    The thing is we are as dependent upon decisions and actions of others, as we are over what we personally can control. At first I felt the sense I could handle this by strict social isolation. Now, confronting the reality that this could go on years, I know I can't and won't isolate for years and years.

    So, my own health will be affected by the extent that the government devotes resources to contact tracing, to testing, to healthcare resources, to coordination between levels of governments and across states, and internationally, too. I worry that the Federal Government so desperately needed now has been abdicating leadership. My health and well-being will be impacted by other peoples' foolhardiness or care.
    I don't believe things will ever be the same. For better or worse. For worse, I wonder if we will ever take for granted travel. I wonder if we will feel comfortable in gyms and beauty shops and intimate restaurants. I wonder if our economy will ever recover. I wonder if small business will be decimated. I wonder if millions will lose their homes. I wonder if the global economy will ever be the same. Not just in terms of GDP but in terms of globalization and supply chains, etc. I worry about even greater centralization of capital and power. While I understand the arguments behind these intrusions, I worry about the loss of privacy from the apps to monitor our whereabouts and our temperatures, and who knows what else.

    At the same time we are being challenged in unprecendented ways, socially, scientifically, culturally, medically, to deal with this, in a good way. We may be challenged to create a better, more equitable society. Gosh. The sky and air where I live are so clear. Maybe the climate has a chance now.
     
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  4. Overwhelmed1

    Overwhelmed1 Active Member

    I love, love, love working from home. On the other hand how long will my job last if the State is not open for business soon?
    I believe we are witnessing a major change in our society and economy moving into the future. I am afraid many of the businesses wont be able to recover and we may have seen some of the last great mom and pop shops and many of our specialty shops that were opened by creative people.
    I may be wrong and I hope I am, but I don't think it will be back to the usual once the States are fully opened.
    I can see where people continue to use the grocery shopper delivery companies, ordering online whenever possible. A shift in the types of jobs that have been created and used more during the shut down may continue on once the States are opened.

    My State is discussing when and how to open. I am not sure we had as many closures as some. There are still many cars in the parking lots all day long at the major supermarkets. None of the fast food businesses closed in my area. (I live and work in a big city) Many of the drug stores, Dollar General, Wal-marts etc have never closed completely, just some of the services.

    I need an oil change, and new breaks for my car. I really would like a hair cut. I have work I need done on my house. And I wish they would have used this shut down to fix the roads while no one was on them.
    Being a little selfish now (smile)
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2020
  5. Crayola13

    Crayola13 Active Member

    I think everyone is going to get sick as soon as everything is re-opened.
     
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  6. BusynMember

    BusynMember Well-Known Member

    I do too. Every time a crowd gets together, people die and get sick. Like at the churches. On the beaches. When people have large parties at home. Cruises. Corona isn't going anywhere and it is expected to come back hard in the fall. It is avoidable for those who want or need to avoid it.

    For now we are letting our son run the business. We are too old to get Corona and be safe. Husband has diabetes. Restaurants we won't go to. Church we will watch from home. Nothing is worth risking life for.

    Husband and I have plenty to do in not crowded areas, strong family ties, and we don't need to go to parties anymore. Many people will get sick and some die when the economy opens. We don't need to join in. Eventually we may move to our summer house on the water and just stay there. We have many connections there and it's a lazy small town not too far from the kids and grands.

    We are already planning our new normal and it may force us to retire and relax earlier than we planned. Not a bad thing in my opinion.
     
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    Last edited: Apr 19, 2020
  7. ChickPea

    ChickPea Active Member

    I could make a decent argument for either side, honestly. There's a lot of unknowns to this virus. We can reopen, but likely will face another wave of this. It is interesting... or I guess I wonder if we (the US) will face a larger recurrence of this in fall/winter because we were faster to stave it off than China or Italy.

    My heart aches for the people that are really suffering financially from this. Businesses that will shut down, etc. - but then I also worry about the horrific impact of a virus that overwhelms our hospitals and kills friends and family. Terrible choices.

    I'm not "thriving" in this lockdown, but I'm surviving. My husband is an essential worker, so our finances are the same. However, I have family that's been laid off, and that can be devastating.

    It's all very difficult.
     
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  8. Copabanana

    Copabanana Well-Known Member

    This is an interesting point Chick Pea, in terms of herd immunity. The figures I read are that between 45 and 80 percent of people will have to have immunity (gotten the virus or a vaccine) for the virus to die down.

    This creates a paradox. Because the fewer people who have become ill, the more people there are who potentially can and will become ill.

    I guess by these phases (where vulnerable people can't stop isolating until phase 3) there is the assumption that less-vulnerable people will gradually more and more be exposed to the illness, kind of like a slow leak in a tire while the most vulnerable take personal responsibility to confine themselves and limit interactions.

    I fear that this will go on for a long time.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2020
  9. ChickPea

    ChickPea Active Member

    Yes, that's also my concern... that this will drag on.
    I understand the slow leak and the pressure that takes off of the healthcare system. I get that. Where I live, we don't have the devastating pressure. We have vents and beds. So, yes, it's frightening, but also we are (somewhat) prepared. The question is how hard it hits, and that seems somewhat random at times. Healthy people devastated by it, and then older people recovering!? The unknown...
     
  10. KTMom91

    KTMom91 Well-Known Member

    I remember my grandmother telling us she lost a year of high school back in 1918-19...graduated in 1920 instead. Back then, they were more self-sufficient, growing/raising food and making their clothes etc. I think that a lot of people will want to come out of self-isolation before the worst of the threat is over, setting off a second or maybe even a third wave.

    Governors should be the ones to make the decision, they're aware of what's happening in their states and if the risk of illness is still great. My state shut down early, we're starting week 5 of shelter in place.
     
  11. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member

    What you said:small increments sound good.
    What Copa said: depends on the decisions and actions of others

    I find myself a little in both camps on this issue.
    Very concerned about the spread. Very concerned about the economy.

    opening gently in small increments with much citizen education, awareness and cooperation sounds like a possibility.

    hopefully many positive changes...more people working from home. Maybe working a few days in the office and a few days at home. Less people crammed into spaces. More and better cleaning . services. Much to think about.
     
  12. RN0441

    RN0441 100% better than I was but not at 100% yet

    All good points.

    I found out today that the President of my company is on the COVID 19 task force in my state. They are meeting tomorrow afternoon so I don't expect to hear anything until after that.

    The beaches here are a huge part of our economy since I live on the coast. I know that they want them reopened but then if we have people coming from all over as normal they could bring the virus with them. The cases in my county are low and there are plenty of hospital beds and ventilators here. I think opening beaches for walking only initially without allowing people to sit/lay in the sand will be impossible to enforce.

    Husband and I follow the rules but don't wear masks or gloves when we go out. We do wash our hands thoroughly and are aware of what we touch outside of our home as much as humanly possible.

    I don't know the answers either.
     
  13. JayPee

    JayPee Sending good vibes...

    I agree with small increments and certainly changes in the areas we work out in at the gym, eat out etc. It seems this is a must to prevent further outbreaks and spreading.

    What I do hope is that this crisis has raised issues with our government on getting more help for the homeless, addicted and mentally ill. That they will re-evaluate the "normal" for our homeless, addicted and mentally ill. For far too long they have gone without adequate help due to the overload of the system. They need proper professional help and we for the most part as their parents, can't provide what they need to get healthier in mind, heart, soul and body.

    They are amongst the most vulnerable and impact the rest of society tremendously with the spread of the virus. They have no where to wash their hands regularly and has been pointed out by others, their issues and crisis in their lives takes precedence and doesn't offer them much room for compassion to the avoidance of the spread of this. They are in survival mode.

    I hope and pray as part of re-opening up our country that this is something that our government looks at with serious concern and some serious alternatives than what is currently available to them.
     
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  14. BusynMember

    BusynMember Well-Known Member

    Yep. Me too. Open up. Shut down. Better. Worse.

    I read too much especially renowned doctors and they don't paint a rosy picture. We will have to adjust. Or get sick. Those over 65 are at high risk so we need to decide if we want to see our grands for more years or play Russian roulette.

    I pick my grands. I do have family visit I would not be able to live alone with no visitors. But I could go forever without eating at a restaurant.
     
  15. RN0441

    RN0441 100% better than I was but not at 100% yet

    Our Governor came on yesterday and basically said nothing. I think they are doing a soft open of beaches here May 1 and then based on that May 15 is the official opening.

    I don't want anyone to spread the virus but I am honestly concerned about the economy now more than anything - if I'm being honest.

    We will continue to social distance and washing hands more!
     
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  16. louise2350

    louise2350 Active Member

    The Governor of Massachusetts has shut the schools down til fall of course, since we have it bad here right now. The daycares don't reopen until the end of June which two of my grandchildren attend. Boston is pretty bad with this virus and all of the large towns in Ma. I do believe that with the intelligence of the doctors and scientists we have there will soon be a vaccination discovered for this virus. I am 70 so am very careful and have been in the stores a few times to purchase my food, but have felt so uncomfortable there that I have started ordering it again. Be safe and God bless everyone.
     
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  17. AppleCori

    AppleCori Well-Known Member

    Well, spring is here, even in the upper Midwest this week, and I feel so optimistic. The sun is shining, the birds are singing, and I can see the light at the end of the tunnel. (I started typing this yesterday and got sidetracked. It is now rainy, but I still feel optimistic).

    I read an article on Sweden yesterday. They think they will have reached “herd immunity” by mid-May, based on models they have been using. I have been very heartened by this news, and I hope this is accurate (though I’m not really totally convinced). They didn’t shut their country down, but relied on the people to follow common sense behaviors. Of course, they have a small, heavily rural population (10 million+ total population) so we can’t expect to have that work here, or the same outcomes immediately in the third largest population country in the world (330+ million), but it will happen eventually. I hope soon!

    We may get another outbreak in the fall or winter, but hopefully we will have systems in place such as contact tracing and possibly antibody testing to help us navigate the situation until the vaccine comes out.

    One thing that has become abundantly clear—we need to start making more of the necessary items in this country, rather than relying on overseas supply chains. We would be in a lot better shape right now if we had. This virus has exposed many weaknesses in the system and we need to remedy them.
     
  18. JMom

    JMom Active Member

    I am tired of being fearful. I am a police officer and have had to be in contact with people daily who are not practicing social distancing, staying clean or giving a flip about others. I am fearful of bringing it home to my kids. I was happy that they shut down their schools, no one wants to see a bunch of kids get this virus. I think a slow roll out is good. I am in agreement with RN, I worry about all of those out of work. We have to have some balance. They could even open county by county to try to contain it.

    I too, think life after Covid-19 will be different. We essentially closed the world in a 24 hour period with a news conference. It puts our sense of security to task and showed us the power of our government. I do see a lot of people returning to basics, starting gardens, sewing, sharing food, exercising and spending time with family, that part I have enjoyed.

    One thing that keeps running through my mind is that some companies/schools/colleges may see that they don't need all of their employees if people can work from home. They can do remote work rather than buy real estate and buildings. As soon as the President gave the go ahead in Texas our highways were packed again. I think some people will be forever changed but most people will return to normal after a short time and Covid 19 will be an after thought.

    In my lifetime (I'm 50) the only event I lived through that had a lasting impact was 9/11. There have been several significant events, but 9/11 changed people in a way that was lasting. We were all terrified. I can't say I am scared of the virus itself, just the thought of my kids going to the hospital and being alone. I know that wasn't the question, sorry. I have a lot of feeling y'all. LOL
     
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  19. BusynMember

    BusynMember Well-Known Member

    Our economy won't recover soon even if it opens. People aren't going to pack stores and movies and bars or they will get sick and we will shut down again. And from the CDC doctors, the next virus wave will be worse. It hasn't gone away yet. We lead the world in this. I trust and listen to doctors only, not any medical predictions from anyone who isn't a doctor.

    All eyes will be on Georgia, opening up today. I expect their rate of illnesses to skyrocket in that state. If those who go out to bars and movie theatres don't get it they will pass it on to vulnerable loved ones. It is so contageous. Tattoo places are a big danger. Hair salons. Restaurants. Bars. Germ factories.

    Younger parents in their fifties have less to worry about as far as dying goes. But what about your mothers, aunts, uncles, younger relatives with asthma and diabetes? High blood pressure?

    Be careful. Please.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2020
  20. Copabanana

    Copabanana Well-Known Member

    I am proud of this country right now. There are voices that are urging people to put themselves at risk and their families at risk, to be sacrificial lambs to get the economy going. And people are right to not trust the voices to tell them to sacrifice themselves. At the same time I can't even let myself imagine what people are feeling who don't have the money to buy food or pay rent or mortgages. I can't even go there. I relate absolutely to the people who feel they have to put themselves at risk, in order that their families eat.

    I receive a pension and I have my own home. The only thing I am faced with is the isolation and having to put wants, plans and dreams on hold, and dealing with a life that has become uncertain and laden with risk. But I see that this is a luxury, that my stress is in the realm of wants that are not urgent necessities.

    My only real worry is that every couple of weeks I seem to go into an altered state and go shop or to the bank, and once out, seem to throw caution to the winds. And then I count the days until 6 days have passed, the interval when 95 percent of people who develop Coronavirus have become symptomatic. And then when the fear recedes, I go out again. I just have such a good time when I go out, that I can't help myself.